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(KHOU Houston)   "And I have never in my life smelled anything like what we've been smelling here the last three weeks," exclaimed one man describing the use of human waste as fertilizer   (khou.com) divider line 21
    More: Obvious, Environmental Quality, fertilizers  
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6968 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 Jun 2013 at 10:23 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-06-19 09:12:40 AM
5 votes:
Using human waste as fertilzer for human food is a really bad idea.  Unless you think the world is overpopulated, which it is, but still there are better ways to reduce population than cholera and the rest of the fecal-borne diseases.
2013-06-19 10:26:58 AM
4 votes:

ZAZ: Using human waste as fertilzer for human food is a really bad idea.  Unless you think the world is overpopulated, which it is, but still there are better ways to reduce population than cholera and the rest of the fecal-borne diseases.


Processed human waste is actually a perfect solution and works much better than other fertilizers
2013-06-19 10:10:32 AM
3 votes:
I worked for a while at an environmental lab in college, and we were called in as consultants to evaluate a company that did this in NJ.  They take processed, municipal sludge (I forget the exact word) and then dry it out in their facility for later use as fertilizer.  The reason that we were there was that a farmer had died, apparently overcome by this one specific VOC after using their product (or a similar one) on his farm.  We had to do GC tests to see if that VOC was actually present in significant quantity.

It was.

ZAZ: Unless you think the world is overpopulated, which it is, but still there are better ways to reduce population than cholera and the rest of the fecal-borne diseases.


The biological contaminant problem didn't come up; the processing was designed to kill off bacteria I figure.
2013-06-19 10:52:09 AM
2 votes:
Those of you who are not crazy about the idea of using human waste as fertilizer (that includes me), would do well to know the country of origin for the produce you buy.
2013-06-19 10:46:42 AM
2 votes:
Dear Julie Lambert of Texas,

Welcome to your free market paradise, which as you have recently found out, may have consequences that you personally don't like and may, in fact, personally affect you in ways you didn't imagine. This is why we occasionally use things like "regulations" and "governmental oversight" and all sort of naughty socialist and fascists words.


(Then again, I can see Texas banning this stuff, if only because it's a bio-recyclable process, which sounds all enviro-hippie and liberal, and therefore must be stopped...at...all...costs...)
2013-06-19 10:27:57 AM
2 votes:
never been near a pig farm, eh?
2013-06-19 10:24:50 AM
2 votes:
I don't want human poop fertilizing my food. Animal poop is fine though. Wait, what?
2013-06-19 11:12:02 AM
1 votes:
1.bp.blogspot.com
2013-06-19 11:04:33 AM
1 votes:

Random Anonymous Blackmail: Wow, not a lot of the typical crappy jokes in here...

/I am disappoint.


img.fark.net
HOWDY HO!!!
2013-06-19 10:50:13 AM
1 votes:

ThreadSinger: If the regulators have done their jobs, then the processes used to converted waste into soil fortifiers will contain no more/less bacteria than is acceptable in soils to begin with.


The sorts of places where human waste is typically used as a fertilizer tend to be rather short on "regulators" at all levels.
2013-06-19 10:47:49 AM
1 votes:

ZAZ: Using human waste as fertilzer for human food is a really bad idea.  Unless you think the world is overpopulated, which it is, but still there are better ways to reduce population than cholera and the rest of the fecal-borne diseases.


It's actually a really excellent idea, the kicker is you actually need to compost it before you use it.
2013-06-19 10:45:21 AM
1 votes:
Is it safe to Use Compost Made From Treated Human Waste?

The Dirty Work of Promoting "Recycling" of America's Sewage Sludge

Biosolids scientists believe that heavy metals are immobilized in sludge forever, don't migrate into groundwater, never become bioavailable, and will not accumulate over time at sites where this material is
applied. They also claim that the organic nature of sludge ensures that land-applied sewage sludge releases nitrogen only as plants need it, and only in the amounts needed. Even pathogens, they contend, are perfectly harmonized with nature: "The organic nature of biosolids means pathogens, if present, adhere to soil, effectively preventing them from entering groundwater; [then] naturally occurring enemy microbes destroy the remaining pathogens."  According to Walker and others, heavy metals are permanently bound to organic matter such that even children ingesting biosolids are protected from lead poisoning.  Walker also considered illnesses reported by residents to be psychosomatic responses to odor and organized an EPA-funded workshop with Duke University psychologists and odor specialists to explore this theory.


This is not good.
2013-06-19 10:43:57 AM
1 votes:

Carn: vernonFL: We once made "fish tea" for our garden. We took some dead fish and left them in a closed bucket of water for about 2 weeks.

When we opened up that bucket to pour it onto our garden, I almost passed out because of the smell. You could smell it 100 yards away. Wow.

For fish emulsion I think you're just supposed to grind it up, mix with water, and use right away.  It will probably still stink as it decomposes in the garden, but maybe not so badly if it's spread out like that.

Processed, composted human waste might be alright for use for trees, shrubs, fill dirt, whatever, but for anything food related?  I don't farking think so.   Aside from just bacteria and disease, how about traces of medicines, drugs, or other chemicals that might be there?


If the regulators have done their jobs, then the processes used to converted waste into soil fortifiers will contain no more/less bacteria than is acceptable in soils to begin with. As for trace medicines, drugs, or other chemicals, this is always a risk no matter what product or foodstuff you use. Not even drinking water can be purified (given current technologies) of every drug known to man, and "animal"-based fertilizers still have the same issues. To say nothing of the chemicals and biocides already spread on crops by farmers, and those picked up during processing, transport, and storage.

Plants, however, are marvelous little solar-powered molecular converters that do not care what the carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus atoms used to be a part of, only what they can build with them. It's an elegant, if viscerally un-appealing solution to the problems of waste processing and sustainable fertilizer production. As for the smell, it can be nasty, but much of this is up to subjective opinion. Chicken, pork, and bovine fertilizer don't smell too great either.

I sympathize for the guy, and for the lady concerned about her property values (a legitimate concern), but I'm also curious to know what is normally spread on those fields. Conventional fertilizers don't generally smell too great either. And people still need to eat.
2013-06-19 10:41:00 AM
1 votes:
That article featured improper use of colons.
2013-06-19 10:37:42 AM
1 votes:

plutoniumfeather


never been near a pig farm, eh?


Be wary of any man who owns a pig farm.

img.fark.net


pic is borrowed
2013-06-19 10:33:59 AM
1 votes:
Move to agricultural area.

Complain about agricultural processes.

Profit.
2013-06-19 10:31:58 AM
1 votes:

Walker: I don't want human poop fertilizing my food. Animal poop is fine though. Wait, what?


That's perfectly reasonable.  Animals don't have diseases adapted to your body.  Dog poop is gross, human poop will kill you.
2013-06-19 10:27:51 AM
1 votes:

vernonFL: We once made "fish tea" for our garden. We took some dead fish and left them in a closed bucket of water for about 2 weeks.

When we opened up that bucket to pour it onto our garden, I almost passed out because of the smell. You could smell it 100 yards away. Wow.


For fish emulsion I think you're just supposed to grind it up, mix with water, and use right away.  It will probably still stink as it decomposes in the garden, but maybe not so badly if it's spread out like that.

Processed, composted human waste might be alright for use for trees, shrubs, fill dirt, whatever, but for anything food related?  I don't farking think so.  Aside from just bacteria and disease, how about traces of medicines, drugs, or other chemicals that might be there?
2013-06-19 10:25:17 AM
1 votes:
Milorganite points, opens a beer, and laughs.
2013-06-19 09:24:13 AM
1 votes:
We once made "fish tea" for our garden. We took some dead fish and left them in a closed bucket of water for about 2 weeks.

When we opened up that bucket to pour it onto our garden, I almost passed out because of the smell. You could smell it 100 yards away. Wow.
2013-06-19 09:11:57 AM
1 votes:
"except, of course, when i pooped this morning", he added
 
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