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(KHOU Houston)   "And I have never in my life smelled anything like what we've been smelling here the last three weeks," exclaimed one man describing the use of human waste as fertilizer   (khou.com) divider line 102
    More: Obvious, Environmental Quality, fertilizers  
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6971 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 Jun 2013 at 10:23 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-06-19 10:59:11 AM  
Oh, Oh, I know!
They had a priest bless it.
Now all good.
They have it on authority.
 
2013-06-19 10:59:41 AM  
Texas needs to get its shiat straight...like China:

http://www.agroecology.org/Case%20Studies/nightsoil.html
 
2013-06-19 10:59:47 AM  
Um - y'all know this has been going on for centuries, right?
Ashes to ashes, dust to dust, burger to miracle-grow.
 
2013-06-19 10:59:51 AM  
Bullshiat, unless you've never been in a public restroom your entire life
 
2013-06-19 11:00:21 AM  
We just need to stop growing our food in the soil. American Agriculture culture is flawed.  Every answer they look for is a bigger problem.  Have fun with your arsenic, prozac, lipitor, and valium infused rice.

Buy local produce from small farms.  Certified Organic doesn't matter.  Local matters.  The more small farms you have close to your neighborhood the better your food supply can be.  Support them.
 
2013-06-19 11:01:14 AM  

ZAZ: Using human waste as fertilzer for human food is a really bad idea.  Unless you think the world is overpopulated, which it is, but still there are better ways to reduce population than cholera and the rest of the fecal-borne diseases.


I'd want it broken down more before using it for crops, maybe use worms, or maggots and then the resulting poop as fertilizer
 
2013-06-19 11:02:33 AM  
CSB time!

When I was a yout, I worked at a gun club/shooting range. An outdoor, skeet-shooting range.

The clay pigeons were fired out over a swampy area. Directly across the parking lot from that facility were 5 giant fields that an enterprising landowner made money with, by allowing septic tank trucking companies to empty on.

The smell of that place, in August, just down-wind....
 
2013-06-19 11:04:33 AM  

Random Anonymous Blackmail: Wow, not a lot of the typical crappy jokes in here...

/I am disappoint.


img.fark.net
HOWDY HO!!!
 
2013-06-19 11:08:34 AM  
next step, "Motel Hell"
 
2013-06-19 11:08:46 AM  
shiat man, try living next door to Gacy.
 
2013-06-19 11:09:52 AM  
If they're going to do it, why not make them do it in liquid form and inject it.  It's done like that with hog manure around here all the time.  Basically a large tank on wheels with cultivators on the back.  Piping is run from the tank to the lowest point on the cultivators so it goes "underground".  Helps significantly with the smell, but not the other issues outlined in above links and discussion.

Once drove by a farm spreading waste from turkey farm and that was far beyond anything hog waste could ever aspire to be.  Farther up the road someone had very recently hit a skunk.  That was the sweetest smelling skunk ever after being subjected to the turkey manure.
 
2013-06-19 11:10:21 AM  

oldfarthenry: Um - y'all know this has been going on for centuries, right?
Ashes to ashes, dust to dust, burger to miracle-grow.


That would be why we KNOW it is a BAD THING.

/but fark that, there is PROFIT just lying around
 
2013-06-19 11:11:10 AM  

Carn: It most certainly is not an excellent idea.


There are certainly ways to do it where it is.  Of course spreading municipal sludge on fields is not a prime example of how to do it correctly.  But we can agree to be disagreeable.
 
2013-06-19 11:12:02 AM  
1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-06-19 11:13:56 AM  

snocone: Skeptical am I.
As a general rule, using human waste for fertilizing food crops is one of the inviolate No-Nos.
Supposedly this stuff is composted, "a month".
Not long enough!

Get to know your spirochetes. And there are some dandy encysted baddies you will meet.


There is more steps than just composting for a month.  The drying process involves cooking it at pasteurizing temps, for one.  As well chemical treatments for good measure.  There is nothing new about human fertilizer, golf courses have been using it for years.  If you ever golfed, you have walked on human fertilizer.
 
2013-06-19 11:14:17 AM  
Shiat Smells Bad - More at 11!
 
2013-06-19 11:15:28 AM  

brap: Carn: It most certainly is not an excellent idea.

There are certainly ways to do it where it is.  Of course spreading municipal sludge on fields is not a prime example of how to do it correctly.  But we can agree to be disagreeable.


I agree to disagree :P

There are things that exist in human feces that don't exist in other animal poo, even other carnivores (which you aren't supposed to use for fertilizer either), heavy metals, traces of medicines, drugs, and other chemicals.  I won't shake my fist and call you names or anything but I'm sticking to my guns that no matter how much you process it, it shouldn't be used for food.  Stuff like this makes me want to expand my garden.  I should make a sign "grown without the benefits of human feces!".
 
2013-06-19 12:31:10 PM  

IdBeCrazyIf: ZAZ: Using human waste as fertilzer for human food is a really bad idea.  Unless you think the world is overpopulated, which it is, but still there are better ways to reduce population than cholera and the rest of the fecal-borne diseases.

Processed human waste is actually a perfect solution and works much better than other fertilizers


CSB Time:

My dad used to tell the story about how his dad (grandpa) once got a load of processed human waste to use as fertilizer on their lawn (back in the 50's - 60's).  He said it rained the next day and the whole place smelled awful.  Then, as the weeks went on they kept finding tomato plants spouting up all over the place.  Turns out the "treatment" didn't get rid of the tomato seeds.
 
2013-06-19 12:40:48 PM  

Walker: I don't want human poop fertilizing my food. Animal poop is fine though. Wait, what?


Really? You can't figure that one out?
 
2013-06-19 12:41:49 PM  

10up: We just need to stop growing our food in the soil.


Say what?
 
2013-06-19 12:42:00 PM  
Back in high school I remember a science teacher telling us that they had been using "solid" human waste to make bricks. There was even a building near us made from it. Never looked at dark brown bricks the same again.
 
2013-06-19 12:44:39 PM  

10up: We just need to stop growing our food in the soil. American Agriculture culture is flawed.  Every answer they look for is a bigger problem.  Have fun with your arsenic, prozac, lipitor, and valium infused rice.

Buy local produce from small farms.  Certified Organic doesn't matter.  Local matters.  The more small farms you have close to your neighborhood the better your food supply can be.  Support them.


So your nearby small farms have solved the problem of needed soil to grow plants? Sweet!
 
2013-06-19 12:49:42 PM  

Carousel Beast: 10up: We just need to stop growing our food in the soil. American Agriculture culture is flawed.  Every answer they look for is a bigger problem.  Have fun with your arsenic, prozac, lipitor, and valium infused rice.

Buy local produce from small farms.  Certified Organic doesn't matter.  Local matters.  The more small farms you have close to your neighborhood the better your food supply can be.  Support them.

So your nearby small farms have solved the problem of needed soil to grow plants? Sweet!


You've heard of compost, right?  Vegetable plants provide plenty of organic matter for it.  Organic farming doesn't rape the soil like large scale farms do.  It's also more labor intensive, hence the cost.  Techniques like raised beds and vertical gardening save space and require less soil also.
 
2013-06-19 12:54:15 PM  
As mentioned upthread--never heard of any problems with Milorganite.

Just buy the original and the best and be done with it.
 
2013-06-19 12:57:04 PM  
Sounds like a bid day at Jesus Ranch!

/The D approves.
 
2013-06-19 12:59:00 PM  
This was big news in the late 1970's.  So big that there was a 60 Mynuts story on it.  The excrement was from NY or NJ (IIRC) and was being spread on corn fields in Nebraska.  Big uproar for about 20 - 30 minutes or so.

tennessee.hillbilly: 10up: We just need to stop growing our food in the soil.

Say what?


Yeah hydroponics can do that - pretty effectively too.  There can be a heath issue there too though.

She said the smell chases her indoors for days at a time.
Meh ever been around when the local fish market drains the lobster tanks?  Bad enough to gag a maggot.  NO AIR, must. have.air. gal
 
2013-06-19 01:02:49 PM  

ZAZ: Using human waste as fertilzer for human food is a really bad idea.  Unless you think the world is overpopulated, which it is, but still there are better ways to reduce population than cholera and the rest of the fecal-borne diseases.



Amen to that. It's much better to only take nutrients from the environment and never return them back. That way, nutrients become scarcer and we can make a lot of money off the threat of starvation.

/derp
 
2013-06-19 01:04:18 PM  
Milorganite also had the added benefit of helping repel various critters from devouring the garden.  Apparently the critters don't like the smell.  The ones that don't heed the smell have a lead issue to deal with.
 
2013-06-19 01:18:41 PM  
10up:
Certified Organic doesn't matter.   Local  Fecal matters.

Fixed
 
2013-06-19 01:19:06 PM  

ZAZ: Using human waste as fertilzer for human food is a really bad idea.  Unless you think the world is overpopulated, which it is, but still there are better ways to reduce population than cholera and the rest of the fecal-borne diseases.


Came here to say this

This
 
2013-06-19 01:22:43 PM  
I thought Milorganite, (treated human waste), was not to be used on any food crops. It could be used on anything else, like sod fields, flower gardens, lawns and non-edible fruit bearing trees.

We've rejected shipments of produce grown in human waste from other countries -- like China. We also reject vegetables rinsed with 'Gray Water' -- a common practice in Mexico.

Sun drying human solids might kill off 98% of the harmful bacteria, but some still remain.

Also, human waste is unique among dung. They've dug up solid waste hundreds of years old from archeological sites (not fecoliths -- which is fossilized versions) and discovered if they add water, the stuff promptly starts reeking.

Considering we have around 3 or 4 million people living in the US, disposal of human waste solids is problematic, but I don't think using it as fertilizer, especially on food crops, is a good idea.

Remember Prions. Those nasty, twisted proteins that cause Mad Cow disease along with kuru-kuru, are not destroyed even by cooking and we have no vaccines or treatment for the disease they cause.

Animals infected were slaughtered and incinerated. One of the sources of contamination came from using desiccated animal tissue as a feed additive to boost protein content in commercial feeds given to food animals. That was supposed to have been stopped. Also stopped was the habit of grinding up 'waste' meat into hamburger additives, consisting of nervous tissue, like the spinal cord and brains along with certain glands. Prions tended to mainly infect those areas.

I think I'd have a problem with a farm next door that smelled like an open sewer day after day. I'd be concerned over any runoff during rain storms also.

You can mix horse manure in with clays and straw to make an organic, brick-like building material and some other animal waste can be combined with cement. However, human waste just stinks. The smell is hard to get rid of. I know of nothing it can be combined with to make a usable material.

I'm not sure if it can even be combined with coal dust and wood scraps to make fuel bricks. Cow pies and Camel dung burn readily enough to be a source of fuel, but human waste doesn't.
 
2013-06-19 01:23:04 PM  

tuna fingers: 10up:
Certified Organic doesn't matter.   Local  Fecal matters.

Fixed


*snicker*
 
2013-06-19 01:30:43 PM  

lack of warmth: snocone: Skeptical am I.
As a general rule, using human waste for fertilizing food crops is one of the inviolate No-Nos.
Supposedly this stuff is composted, "a month".
Not long enough!

Get to know your spirochetes. And there are some dandy encysted baddies you will meet.

There is more steps than just composting for a month.  The drying process involves cooking it at pasteurizing temps, for one.  As well chemical treatments for good measure.  There is nothing new about human fertilizer, golf courses have been using it for years.  If you ever golfed, you have walked on human fertilizer.


Well, you have managed to invoke two idiot activities.
Golf, no one hits the damned ball back.
Human waste, not for food, ever, not even then!
There's "chit' it there not even "pasteurizing" temps save you from.

But, after a lifetime of trying to educate fools on 4 continents on the chit for profit thingie, I know where the money goes.
 
2013-06-19 01:31:49 PM  
They had signs posted all over the Deschutes forest about how the trees are fertilized with people poop several years back. Kind of nasty and not something that draws the crowds to a national forest.
 
2013-06-19 01:37:15 PM  
Oh, and I suppose HIS s*** doesn't stink.
 
2013-06-19 01:40:42 PM  

ThreadSinger: If the regulators have done their jobs, then the processes used to converted waste into soil fortifiers will contain no more/less bacteria than is acceptable in soils to begin with.


Why do you want to jam the government's beak into everything? Do you think we can build a successful enterprise with regulators looking over our shoulders every minute? You think that will be a Job Creator? Do you want Texas to become another Socialist Satellite State? Do you hate freedom?
 
2013-06-19 01:46:38 PM  

dougls_99: Soylent Green is PEOPLE!


Ha! I just watched that last night. Weird little film.

As has already been said upthread, there's a shiat-ton of stuff in human waste that I would NOT want on my food. Besides the disease risks - all the frikin medicines we as a society gobble up. Vegetables impregnated with antidepressants, oxycontin, steroids and hormones - Yum! Plus all the illegal drugs like meth and bath salts. Tasty.

/hm, I ate a tomato and now I have tits. Thanks Texas!
 
2013-06-19 02:07:14 PM  
Oh great, now I not only have to worry about my produce making its own pesticides and stress responses to herbicides, I have other peoples' pharmaceutical residues in my food too. Big fan of humanure done right, but it should only be used on crops that won't enter the food web (har, har maybe biofuel crops?) or, well, if it's from hippies who don't ingest anything gross.
 
2013-06-19 02:11:48 PM  
And I have never in my life smelled anything like what we've been smelling here

His shiat don't stink?
 
2013-06-19 02:15:38 PM  
* and other peoples' prions and heavy metals, I am reminded by reading thread. Though from geology classes I seem to remember mumblings of plants such as tobacco and cat-tails being supposedly good at sucking up heavy metals contamination e.g. in bioremediation ponds at mine sites.
 
2013-06-19 02:31:31 PM  
The heavy metal thing is not correct.  Or rather it's a conflation of two issues.

If we had lots of heavy metals in our poop, then they obviously wouldn't be accumulating in our tissue, and so the point is moot.
The problem is that lots of other things that get into the waste stream (batteries, electronics, appliances, glass) have lots of lead and other heavy metals in them.
A home composting toilet would not be a problem for the heavy metals.

The pathogens, however, are another story altogether.
 
2013-06-19 02:41:26 PM  

FrancoFile: Milorganite points, opens a beer, and laughs.


Weve got a bag in the garage, sometimes i wonder how much of it is mine. Like parts per million? Parts per thousand?
 
2013-06-19 02:42:35 PM  

FrancoFile: The heavy metal thing is not correct.  Or rather it's a conflation of two issues.

If we had lots of heavy metals in our poop, then they obviously wouldn't be accumulating in our tissue, and so the point is moot.
The problem is that lots of other things that get into the waste stream (batteries, electronics, appliances, glass) have lots of lead and other heavy metals in them.
A home composting toilet would not be a problem for the heavy metals.

The pathogens, however, are another story altogether.


The pathogens, however, are another story
 
2013-06-19 03:02:26 PM  
img.fark.net

Somebody has used poop for fertilizer.  How will I ever survive?  Get over it you bunch of nancies.  What do you want ot bet the same posters worried about heavy metals are also the same posters in the food threads saying lobster, crab, clams, shrimp, etc YUM!
 
2013-06-19 03:09:12 PM  

blatz514: FrancoFile: The heavy metal thing is not correct.  Or rather it's a conflation of two issues.

If we had lots of heavy metals in our poop, then they obviously wouldn't be accumulating in our tissue, and so the point is moot.
The problem is that lots of other things that get into the waste stream (batteries, electronics, appliances, glass) have lots of lead and other heavy metals in them.
A home composting toilet would not be a problem for the heavy metals.

The pathogens, however, are another story altogether.

The pathogens, however, are another story


The pathogens, however, are another story.
 
2013-06-19 03:49:37 PM  
Guess he's never been to Korea.


/watch out for the turtle ditches too.
 
2013-06-19 04:01:22 PM  

snowshovel: Dear Julie Lambert of Texas,

Welcome to your free market paradise, which as you have recently found out, may have consequences that you personally don't like and may, in fact, personally affect you in ways you didn't imagine. This is why we occasionally use things like "regulations" and "governmental oversight" and all sort of naughty socialist and fascists words.


(Then again, I can see Texas banning this stuff, if only because it's a bio-recyclable process, which sounds all enviro-hippie and liberal, and therefore must be stopped...at...all...costs...)


Try dumping this stuff near Malibu in the land of rich liberal celebrities and you'd have the same result, if not more so.  Some things aren't political.  This is one of them.
 
2013-06-19 04:09:55 PM  

phlegmmo: blatz514: FrancoFile: The heavy metal thing is not correct.  Or rather it's a conflation of two issues.

If we had lots of heavy metals in our poop, then they obviously wouldn't be accumulating in our tissue, and so the point is moot.
The problem is that lots of other things that get into the waste stream (batteries, electronics, appliances, glass) have lots of lead and other heavy metals in them.
A home composting toilet would not be a problem for the heavy metals.

The pathogens, however, are another story altogether.

The pathogens, however, are another story

The pathogens, however, are another story.


The Parthians, however, are another story.
 
2013-06-19 04:16:24 PM  

AngryJailhouseFistfark: phlegmmo: blatz514: FrancoFile: The heavy metal thing is not correct.  Or rather it's a conflation of two issues.

If we had lots of heavy metals in our poop, then they obviously wouldn't be accumulating in our tissue, and so the point is moot.
The problem is that lots of other things that get into the waste stream (batteries, electronics, appliances, glass) have lots of lead and other heavy metals in them.
A home composting toilet would not be a problem for the heavy metals.

The pathogens, however, are another story altogether.

The pathogens, however, are another story

The pathogens, however, are another story.

The Parthians, however, are another story.


This is true.
 
2013-06-19 06:19:27 PM  

MythDragon: Guess he's never been to Korea.


/watch out for the turtle ditches too.


When I was there in the late 80s, we were told never to eat the local fruit because it was likely to have been fertilized with human poo and was a significant risk of Hep C and various other ills. The watermelon and strawberries there were enormous, and the sweetest ones I've ever eaten, though.

/doesn't have Hep C
//Never fell in a turtle ditch my whole time there, despite all the soju swilling we did back then.
 
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