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(Awesome Robo)   Disney bases its upcoming feature movie teaser off of a student's animation with their permission and full credit. Oh wait. About that last part   (awesome-robo.com) divider line 47
    More: Interesting, Disney, feature films, animations, permissions  
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5446 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 19 Jun 2013 at 4:33 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



47 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-06-19 12:13:25 AM  
To late.  Congress is going to allow Disney to own this for the next 250 years.
 
2013-06-19 12:19:24 AM  
Disney will sue the original artist and win because fark you.
 
2013-06-19 12:23:42 AM  
And two movies about the white house being attacked while a black president are in charge is coming out this summer, but that doesn't mean they stole from each other.
 
2013-06-19 12:26:39 AM  
Sure it looks the same, and in every detail but one it may BE the same, but in the Disney one it's a moose, not a rabbit.

TOTALLY not the same.
 
2013-06-19 12:43:27 AM  
It must suck to be Disney, to have to steal content, and then make it WORSE.
 
2013-06-19 12:45:16 AM  
Hey, it looks like this little student film is about to make some money after all.
 
2013-06-19 01:08:15 AM  

unyon: Hey, it looks like this little student film is about to make some money after all.


Don't count on it. Disney has legions of lawyers on stand by.

The best thing is for the kid to get a job at Disney or Pixar or Dreamworks and not poison his well and be happy with the publicity...it's GOLD for the student. He made something that Farken Disney copied.
 
2013-06-19 02:06:26 AM  
$$
 
2013-06-19 02:14:34 AM  
Based off of?
 
2013-06-19 03:54:07 AM  
The original seems a lot better than the Disney version. It seems more genuine somehow, there isn't a FEEL SAD NOW flag popping up.

Although it could just be my intense hatred for that cartoon archetype- the hillbilly dweeb guy with the exaggerated jaw. I wish I could bring that snowman to life just so I could kill him
 
2013-06-19 04:30:51 AM  
Disney is farking incapable of original ideas. I don't get how such a ridiculously wealthy corporation can't get some artists to write something original.
 
2013-06-19 04:37:51 AM  
" nmrsnr [TotalFark] SmartestFunniest 2013-06-19 12:23:42 AM And two movies about the white house being attacked while a black president are in charge is coming out this summer, but that doesn't mean they stole from each other "only one of those has a black president, sir.
 
2013-06-19 04:42:02 AM  

God-is-a-Taco: The original seems a lot better than the Disney version. It seems more genuine somehow, there isn't a FEEL SAD NOW flag popping up.


Lot's of this.
 
2013-06-19 05:00:55 AM  
There's a huge difference between those two videos - the first one actually has enough production quality and comedic timing to be worth paying money for and showing to your kids. The Disney one looks like an 8th grade special ed project.
 
2013-06-19 05:03:35 AM  
Disney will argue that this is a fair use parody of the original piece. You see, in the original skit the snowman cam across as a likeable character, one that you would root for, but in the Disney piece he came across as a slack jawed yokel that insulted the intelligence of the source material. Ergo, Disney is poking fun at the seriousness and quality of the original as a form of social commentary.

Also F-you, cause the mouse said so.
 
2013-06-19 05:16:05 AM  
Isn't this standard operating procedure for Disney?
img.fark.net
 
2013-06-19 05:36:15 AM  
you know how I know none of you read the article?
 
2013-06-19 05:49:32 AM  

stonelotus: you know how I know none of you read the article?


I'm pretty sleepy so I might have missed something, but I read the article. What are you alluding to? Was there something hidden in the text stating that how this appears is not how it is because...
 
2013-06-19 06:16:48 AM  
Now let's be fair about this.

Which company has the money?  Which company employs more people?

It's obvious who should win this case.  The fact of the matter is that Walt Disney dreamed this during his first nocturnal emission and there he owns the rights and He willed them to a corporation and from now until Disney ceases to be a company with even a storefront location in East Texas it will be protected just and God and George Washington intended!
 
2013-06-19 06:25:47 AM  

propasaurus: Based off of?


this
 
2013-06-19 06:33:27 AM  
Reminds me of something that happened to me not too long ago; I and an artist entered a comic book concept in a contest for a series, winner would get a contract deal. We lost, and a year later a book comesout with almost the exact same plot, with just enough details changed so as to escape legal action. We were so devastated and my artist quit over it. Oh, what could have been...
 
2013-06-19 06:54:12 AM  

degenerate-afro: Isn't this standard operating procedure for Disney?
[img.fark.net image 420x303]


i thought they just rewrote othello with animals
 
2013-06-19 06:55:37 AM  
If that student did the work as part of a school project he likely doesn't own the rights to it.
 
2013-06-19 07:48:56 AM  

some_beer_drinker: degenerate-afro: Isn't this standard operating procedure for Disney?
[img.fark.net image 420x303]

i thought they just rewrote othello with animals


...
Hamlet?
 
2013-06-19 07:58:59 AM  
Didn't Pixar do this?

www.watcherswatch.com

/hot like global warming
 
2013-06-19 08:02:11 AM  

ecmoRandomNumbers: Disney is farking incapable of original ideas. I don't get how such a ridiculously wealthy corporation can't get some artists to write something original.


What is the point when you can steal content for free?
 
2013-06-19 08:02:55 AM  

degenerate-afro: Isn't this standard operating procedure for Disney?


Also see Nadia of Blue Water and Disney's Atlantis.
 
2013-06-19 08:08:10 AM  

assjuice: If that student did the work as part of a school project he likely doesn't own the rights to it.


This.

Where was the student attending school? What if any association does that school have with Disney? What waivers of rights did said student sign to participate in the school they attend? Did the school own the entry? Did the school sell it to Disney? Was the school owned by Disney and did participation in some contest held by said school transfer the work to Disney?

Is there any traceable association with anyone who worked on this project and any public venue the animation was part of? Is it possible this is just a case of synchronicity?
 
2013-06-19 08:24:34 AM  
Media Piracy is a felony!


I am above the law!  <Squeeeeeeeeek>
 
2013-06-19 08:41:08 AM  
That student should make a short about a girl that moves into a forest house with a bunch of small miners and see how much traction the complaints get.
 
2013-06-19 08:58:25 AM  

assjuice: If that student did the work as part of a school project he likely doesn't own the rights to it.


that has zero to do with Disney using it without attribution and permission
 
2013-06-19 08:58:53 AM  
Wreck it Ralph was still way better than Brave.

/ number five loves EVE!
 
2013-06-19 09:01:18 AM  

degenerate-afro: Isn't this standard operating procedure for Disney?
[img.fark.net image 420x303]


Although, to be fair, Disney animation is now a Pixar show, so i am willing to give the new team more slack than the old.
 
2013-06-19 09:03:09 AM  

legion_of_doo: Wreck it Ralph was still way better than Brave.


Fact
 
2013-06-19 09:07:57 AM  

Teiritzamna: legion_of_doo: Wreck it Ralph was still way better than Brave.

Fact


Undersigned.  I liked Brave, but it wasn't quite the tough-girl anti-princess breakout I wanted it to be.  Vanellope could kick Meridia's ass.
 
2013-06-19 09:28:12 AM  

KhamanV: Teiritzamna: legion_of_doo: Wreck it Ralph was still way better than Brave.

Fact

Undersigned.  I liked Brave, but it wasn't quite the tough-girl anti-princess breakout I wanted it to be.  Vanellope could kick Meridia's ass.


I liked them both, but my favorite Pixar film still stands as "Up". Probably the first American animated film that drew a sincere tear out of me.
 
2013-06-19 09:38:08 AM  
Will Walt's frozen head make a cameo?
 
2013-06-19 09:53:44 AM  
Is anyone surprised. Disney does this nigh constantly.  http://www.cartoonbrew.com/disney/did-disney-steal-alice-in-wonderlan d -artwork-from-a-college-student-80797.html  Its like they troll deviant art for their product line.
 
2013-06-19 10:09:51 AM  

some_beer_drinker: degenerate-afro: Isn't this standard operating procedure for Disney?
[img.fark.net image 420x303]

i thought they just rewrote othello with animals


Look up Kimba the White Lion some time.  There's more than a passing resemblance in the two stories.  Considering Kimba was written in the 50s and animated in the 60s, I'm willing to say it had a bit of a head start on the Lion King.
 
2013-06-19 12:38:12 PM  

degenerate-afro: some_beer_drinker: degenerate-afro: Isn't this standard operating procedure for Disney?
[img.fark.net image 420x303]

i thought they just rewrote othello with animals

Look up Kimba the White Lion some time.  There's more than a passing resemblance in the two stories.  Considering Kimba was written in the 50s and animated in the 60s, I'm willing to say it had a bit of a head start on the Lion King.


I think he meant to say they rewrote Hamlet, which would seem to be the case. Considering Hamlet was written sometime around 1600, I'm willing to say it had a bit of a head start on the Lion King and the White Lion.
 
2013-06-19 01:03:23 PM  

degenerate-afro: Isn't this standard operating procedure for Disney?



YES
i235.photobucket.com
 
2013-06-19 05:02:31 PM  

Mattyb710: degenerate-afro: some_beer_drinker: degenerate-afro: Isn't this standard operating procedure for Disney?
[img.fark.net image 420x303]

i thought they just rewrote othello with animals

Look up Kimba the White Lion some time.  There's more than a passing resemblance in the two stories.  Considering Kimba was written in the 50s and animated in the 60s, I'm willing to say it had a bit of a head start on the Lion King.

I think he meant to say they rewrote Hamlet, which would seem to be the case. Considering Hamlet was written sometime around 1600, I'm willing to say it had a bit of a head start on the Lion King and the White Lion.


Disney rewrote Kimba the White Lion.  Kimba probably borrowed elements from Hamlet, but  Disney only "borrowed" elements because it was stolen wholesale from Kimba.

It is no coincidence there are some animated sequences that match almost exactly between Kimba and the Lion King (baring advancements in animation and budget between 1960 and 1990 obviously). From the Baboon mentor to the Hyena comic relief characters.
 Also Kimba - Simba?

upload.wikimedia.org
Yeah, that would take a genius to figure out.
 
2013-06-19 05:26:47 PM  

Herr Morgenstern: Reminds me of something that happened to me not too long ago; I and an artist entered a comic book concept in a contest for a series, winner would get a contract deal. We lost, and a year later a book comesout with almost the exact same plot, with just enough details changed so as to escape legal action. We were so devastated and my artist quit over it. Oh, what could have been...


Years ago, when the show was still good, I wrote a spec script of How I Met Your Mother and submitted it to a TV Writing Fellowship at CBS. It was my first stab at sitcom writing, which is tough if you've never done it before. Every line of dialogue is either the set-up or the punchline for a joke. I spent probably too much time pouring over old episodes to familiarize myself with the characters and the writing style. I thought I came up with something pretty good, though not great. I submitted and was not accepted into the program. About a year later, I was watching a new episode and there was a complicated framing device that was almost exactly like the framing device that I used. I thought it was strange but didn't make much of it. Over the rest of that season, there were two other times where they used a very specific joke that I had written in my spec. Not word for word, but definitely the same.

I mentioned this to a friend who works in sitcom writing and he said, from his experience, there was a nearly 0% chance that someone who reviewed my script for the fellowship program would have had access or interest in sending my jokes to the show's writing staff. What I had done, he suggested, was understand the characters and writing style well enough to write certain things that the writer's of the show might also tap into, independently. I can't disagree with that logic but I still chuckle to myself when I see those jokes in reruns.

/csb
//your experience with the comics contest may have been more directly lifted from what you created, so no disrespect.
 
2013-06-19 05:42:36 PM  
^^^^^^ Osamu Tezuka (the creator of Kimba the White Lion) could have EASILY won a lawsuit of the Disney Corporation for MILLIONS of dollars. The only reason he didn't was he felt he wouldn't have become an animator if it wasn't for Walt Disney.

Fred Ladd was a producer for the Lion King and admitted that it came from Kimba. In the 1960's he also helped to produce for America an imported Japanese cartoon that was re-dubbed in English named..........Kimba the White Lion.

From an article: ...That's what infuriates Ladd, a longtime member of the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. "I honestly don't know how they can call it a coincidence," he said.  ...Takayuki Matsutani, believed the creator of "Kimba," the late legendary cartoonist Osamu Tezuka, would not have wanted to sue because of the deep respect he held for the founder of the company, Walt Disney, who died years before "Lion King" was made. "They are not litigious people," said Ladd. "They just let it go."

Even Matthew Broderick thought he was doing Kimba the White Lion. From Wiki: "I thought he meant Kimba, who was a white lion in a cartoon when I was a little kid," said Broderick. "So I kept telling everybody I was going to play Kimba. I didn't really know anything about it, but I didn't really care."


99% of Disney's entire animation catalog is nothing but other people's ideas. From fairy tails, to other people's intellectual property (see: The Lion King), including Oswald Rab... i mean, Mickey Mouse. Walt Disney Studios is the least creative animation studio in the history of animation. They also have a long history of treating their animators like garbage.
 
2013-06-19 06:39:33 PM  

degenerate-afro: Mattyb710: degenerate-afro: some_beer_drinker: degenerate-afro: Isn't this standard operating procedure for Disney?
[img.fark.net image 420x303]

i thought they just rewrote othello with animals

Look up Kimba the White Lion some time.  There's more than a passing resemblance in the two stories.  Considering Kimba was written in the 50s and animated in the 60s, I'm willing to say it had a bit of a head start on the Lion King.

I think he meant to say they rewrote Hamlet, which would seem to be the case. Considering Hamlet was written sometime around 1600, I'm willing to say it had a bit of a head start on the Lion King and the White Lion.

Disney rewrote Kimba the White Lion.  Kimba probably borrowed elements from Hamlet, but  Disney only "borrowed" elements because it was stolen wholesale from Kimba.

It is no coincidence there are some animated sequences that match almost exactly between Kimba and the Lion King (baring advancements in animation and budget between 1960 and 1990 obviously). From the Baboon mentor to the Hyena comic relief characters.
 Also Kimba - Simba?

[upload.wikimedia.org image 498x186]
Yeah, that would take a genius to figure out.


I understand that Disney ripped off the Japanese version. I'm not excusing them. I'm saying that everyone in the entertainment business these days does this shiat, and to think of Disney as somehow worse than any others is laughable. They are all incredibly devoid of any real new ideas.
 
2013-06-19 07:05:51 PM  

Kid the Universe: Herr Morgenstern: Reminds me of something that happened to me not too long ago; I and an artist entered a comic book concept in a contest for a series, winner would get a contract deal. We lost, and a year later a book comesout with almost the exact same plot, with just enough details changed so as to escape legal action. We were so devastated and my artist quit over it. Oh, what could have been...

Years ago, when the show was still good, I wrote a spec script of How I Met Your Mother and submitted it to a TV Writing Fellowship at CBS. It was my first stab at sitcom writing, which is tough if you've never done it before. Every line of dialogue is either the set-up or the punchline for a joke. I spent probably too much time pouring over old episodes to familiarize myself with the characters and the writing style. I thought I came up with something pretty good, though not great. I submitted and was not accepted into the program. About a year later, I was watching a new episode and there was a complicated framing device that was almost exactly like the framing device that I used. I thought it was strange but didn't make much of it. Over the rest of that season, there were two other times where they used a very specific joke that I had written in my spec. Not word for word, but definitely the same.

I mentioned this to a friend who works in sitcom writing and he said, from his experience, there was a nearly 0% chance that someone who reviewed my script for the fellowship program would have had access or interest in sending my jokes to the show's writing staff. What I had done, he suggested, was understand the characters and writing style well enough to write certain things that the writer's of the show might also tap into, independently. I can't disagree with that logic but I still chuckle to myself when I see those jokes in reruns.

/csb
//your experience with the comics contest may have been more directly lifted from what you created, so no disrespect.


Yeah, I've long since become wary of entering "writing contests" or the like. The comic contest was a public audience participation thing wherein visitors to the website voted for their favorite submission. Thousands of people probably saw it during the voting process, any one of whom could have taken the idea. I know who it was, but I'm not about to start pointing fingers since I don't have a legal leg to stand on. But yeah, lesson learned, guard your ideas like a jealous dragon guards its hoard.
 
2013-06-19 08:42:54 PM  

Herr Morgenstern: Kid the Universe: Herr Morgenstern: Reminds me of something that happened to me not too long ago; I and an artist entered a comic book concept in a contest for a series, winner would get a contract deal. We lost, and a year later a book comesout with almost the exact same plot, with just enough details changed so as to escape legal action. We were so devastated and my artist quit over it. Oh, what could have been...

Years ago, when the show was still good, I wrote a spec script of How I Met Your Mother and submitted it to a TV Writing Fellowship at CBS. It was my first stab at sitcom writing, which is tough if you've never done it before. Every line of dialogue is either the set-up or the punchline for a joke. I spent probably too much time pouring over old episodes to familiarize myself with the characters and the writing style. I thought I came up with something pretty good, though not great. I submitted and was not accepted into the program. About a year later, I was watching a new episode and there was a complicated framing device that was almost exactly like the framing device that I used. I thought it was strange but didn't make much of it. Over the rest of that season, there were two other times where they used a very specific joke that I had written in my spec. Not word for word, but definitely the same.

I mentioned this to a friend who works in sitcom writing and he said, from his experience, there was a nearly 0% chance that someone who reviewed my script for the fellowship program would have had access or interest in sending my jokes to the show's writing staff. What I had done, he suggested, was understand the characters and writing style well enough to write certain things that the writer's of the show might also tap into, independently. I can't disagree with that logic but I still chuckle to myself when I see those jokes in reruns.

/csb
//your experience with the comics contest may have been more directly lifted from what you created, so no disrespe ...


"guard your ideas," yes. but accept that all ideas are perhaps shared if only because they come from the same fountain of influence. when i am writing at my very best, i feel like i am riding the wave of the moment. other surfers may have caught the same wave.

but don't ever be jealous of other surfers. Jealousy only takes from you
 
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