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(New York Daily News)   Meet the men NASA is sending to Mars and the women it's sending to Venus   (nydailynews.com) divider line 92
    More: Spiffy, Sally Ride, NASA, Bolden!, naval air station, astronauts, helicopter pilot  
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3654 clicks; posted to Geek » on 18 Jun 2013 at 11:51 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-06-18 11:58:53 AM
To boldly go where we've gone before. These are the voyages of the Low Earth Orbit tin can.
 
2013-06-18 12:04:42 PM
So how many years before Astronaut no longer gets you all the beers you can drink at any bar anywhere?
 
2013-06-18 12:07:01 PM
They seem to be operating under the delusion that the United States still has a manned space flight program.
 
2013-06-18 12:29:28 PM

Cybernetic: They seem to be operating under the delusion that the United States still has a manned space flight program.


You seem to be operating under the delusion that a manned space program means something more than political flag waving.

If you believe a manned space program is such a boon to a country, move to Russia and tell me if you still believe manned space means something. They beat the Americans in most space milestones, I don't see space enthusiasts extolling the virtues of space for Russia.
 
2013-06-18 12:31:38 PM
Why. We can't land there, so there's nothing humans than can do that an unmanned satellite can't.
 
2013-06-18 12:35:05 PM
What about the men being sent to Uranus?
 
2013-06-18 12:35:17 PM

Cybernetic: They seem to be operating under the delusion that the United States still has a manned space flight program.


Ah, I was wondering how long it'd take for you to show up Debbie. True the state of manned spaceflight is not good, but its not as disastrous as you and others are proclaiming with such a ridiculous statement.

We have a space gap, it isn't the end of the world, and it isn't the first gap. It is though the first time we've had a functional manned space program despite not having a US spacecraft available to us.  There are after all two US astronauts aboard ISS right this very moment, and thanks to the Russian's Soyuz spacecraft we continue to have a ride into orbit and presence aboard the International Space Station. Hopefully by 2015, 2016, or 2017 we'll have a US spacecraft capable of returning us to space without the aid of the Russian's. The last gap between Apollo-Shuttle was five years. This one could be shorter seeing as Space X already has a functional/proven spacecraft/launcher, but even if Space X doesn't get there Boeing may very well with a planned test flight of their CST-100 spacecraft in 2016 or 2017. Either way there will be a manned US spacecraft flying before 2020.
 
2013-06-18 12:38:51 PM
Screening Test
1.  Would you put on a pair of adult diapers and drive to Orlando to kidnap a romantic rival?
   a.  Yes
   b.  No
   c.  Poo
 
2013-06-18 12:41:56 PM

simplicimus: Why. We can't land there, so there's nothing humans than can do that an unmanned satellite can't.


Luddite. We will send a 3D printer because resources and stuff. Duh. Things really are that simple, it's just politics holding us back, just like politics held us back from going to the Moon in the first place.

bbfreak: Either way there will be a manned US spacecraft flying before 2020.


Why is this so important? Difficulty: no symbolism or appeal to romantic ideals or emotional sci-fi stuff.
 
2013-06-18 12:48:25 PM
They're sending the women to Venus? Not cool NASA, not cool. I mean, I know you've been a bit of a boys club since your inception, but that's no reason to launch women into the hellscape that is the Morning Star.
 
2013-06-18 12:53:49 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: simplicimus: Why. We can't land there, so there's nothing humans than can do that an unmanned satellite can't.

Luddite. We will send a 3D printer because resources and stuff. Duh. Things really are that simple, it's just politics holding us back, just like politics held us back from going to the Moon in the first place.

bbfreak: Either way there will be a manned US spacecraft flying before 2020.

Why is this so important? Difficulty: no symbolism or appeal to romantic ideals or emotional sci-fi stuff.


Manned space flight is less important from an astronomical research perspective, but it is very important from a technological perspective. The challenges of sending people into space and developing systems which can support and protect them provides a lot of collateral technology and pushes innovation in ways most other industries don't. In the short term and in purely astronomical terms, manned space missions have a much higher cost to value ratio than unmanned, but in the long term they typically have much higher returns. Which is not to say that unmanned missions need to be put on the back burner, they need at least equal priority. Probably greater really, but manned missions are still important.
 
2013-06-18 12:53:59 PM
Unless they are all gays and lesbians, NASA is doing it all wrong. It should be the opposite. Men should go to Venus and women to Mars. For obvious reasons.
 
2013-06-18 01:01:47 PM
I guess we live in the reality where Carter gets to be an astronaut.

Bright side no snakes in our brains.
 
2013-06-18 01:07:03 PM

Oerath: but it is very important from a technological perspective.


I don't believe that. I believe space was the apex of 20th century development, not the base.

Oerath: he challenges of sending people into space and developing systems which can support and protect them provides a lot of collateral technology and pushes innovation in ways most other industries don't.


That's your opinion. The same can be said of deep-sea diving. Why don't you try living in a volcano? That'll push technology along. For what, I don't know. It's this kind of circular reasoning about space that I decry.

"We need to develop this technology for space because it will be used in space!"

And?

Oerath: but manned missions are still important.


They just aren't. It's a cargo cult at this point. Do the thrill rides privately and move on. The Space Age is as dead as disco.

People in the 19th century thought Mars was inhabited with an advanced civilization. It just isn't. People moved on.

Then people thought the universe was the Milky Way. Nope. People moved on.

Then people thought Venus was a lush tropical paradise. Oops. People moved on.

Then people thought we'd build these enormous technological totem poles in the sky because technology.

Nope.

Move on.
 
2013-06-18 01:10:57 PM
Oerath:
Manned space flight is less important from an astronomical research perspective, but it is very important from a technological perspective. The challenges of sending people into space and developing systems which can support and protect them provides a lot of collateral technology and pushes innovation in ways most other industries don't. In the short term and in purely astronomical terms, manned space missions have a much higher cost to value ratio than unmanned, but in the long term they typically have much higher returns. Which is not to say that unmanned missions need to be put on the back burner, they need at least equal priority. Probably greater really, but manned missions are still important.

Currently we have no technology that would make a trip to Mars anything but a one-way fatal excursion. We don't even have probes that can survive landing on Venus. Until our technology advances significantly, there's no point for manned trips to these planets. After our technology advances to that point, there's still no reason to Venus. Maybe Mars, depending on what the probes find.. The Moon makes the most sense if we want to set up a colony, if there were anything worth having there.,
 
2013-06-18 01:12:50 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: To boldly go where we've gone before. These are the voyages of the Low Earth Orbit tin can.


Win.
 
2013-06-18 01:15:16 PM
Super! A team that is out of commission a week out of every month.
 
2013-06-18 01:16:18 PM

Cybernetic: They seem to be operating under the delusion that the United States still has a manned space flight program.


There are more Americans continuously in space now than there ever have been in human history.

So we don't have a human spaceflight program??? How does your logic work??

6+2 = 0?
 
2013-06-18 01:18:53 PM

maniacbastard: Cybernetic: They seem to be operating under the delusion that the United States still has a manned space flight program.

There are more Americans continuously in space now than there ever have been in human history.


 Yes, we can tell by the planetary situation, the value of these flights is immense.
 
2013-06-18 01:20:43 PM

Myria: Quantum Apostrophe: To boldly go where we've gone before. These are the voyages of the Low Earth Orbit tin can.

Win.


Uh oh, you're going to be black listed at the Annual Space Nutter Award Ceremony. I hear good things about this year's Most Deluded category.
 
2013-06-18 01:24:41 PM
Quantum Apostrophe:

media.tumblr.com media.tumblr.com
media.tumblr.com media.tumblr.com


Can you ever just SHUT THE FARK UP about 3D printers, and you're anti-space crusade... Do you have to farking interject in every god damn farking conversation, shiat all over it before one even starts, or just be so god damn farking annoying...

SHUT THE FARK UP AND FARK OFF ALREADY!
 
2013-06-18 01:26:53 PM
There just isn't much worth visiting in our system.  They're all just deserted rocks and big balls of gas.

Lets say that we have astronauts land on Mars.  They'll have spent 2 years traveling, and finally get to open the door to step on Mars.  The first person to step there will just think, "I went all this way just to land in a desert?"  I bet a lot of science experiments they do will just confirm that there is but rock, much like our Moon.
 
2013-06-18 01:32:20 PM

KellyX: Quantum Apostrophe:

[media.tumblr.com image 330x320] [media.tumblr.com image 330x320]
[media.tumblr.com image 330x320] [media.tumblr.com image 330x320]

Can you ever just SHUT THE FARK UP about 3D printers, and you're anti-space crusade... Do you have to farking interject in every god damn farking conversation, shiat all over it before one even starts, or just be so god damn farking annoying...

SHUT THE FARK UP AND FARK OFF ALREADY!


OK, go live in space and I'll shut up about your delusions. Show me the fantastic opportunities in a deadly vacuum.

Why have you imbued a dead vacuum with so much symbolism? So much so that a little contrary opinion can set you off like that?

Hm?
 
2013-06-18 01:33:44 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: That's your opinion. The same can be said of deep-sea diving. Why don't you try living in a volcano? That'll push technology along.


Deep sea diving probably will provide useful technologies, and is in some ways a good analog for space. Unfortunately considerably less people are interested in funding 6 month-2 year deep sea expeditions that would yield such technological results. And the volcano... well we both know what you were doing there, but honestly I don't see a lot of useful tech coming out of that. And again, no one wants to fund it.

simplicimus: Currently we have no technology that would make a trip to Mars anything but a one-way fatal excursion. We don't even have probes that can survive landing on Venus. Until our technology advances significantly, there's no point for manned trips to these planets. After our technology advances to that point, there's still no reason to Venus. Maybe Mars, depending on what the probes find.. The Moon makes the most sense if we want to set up a colony, if there were anything worth having there.,


Venus is a dead end, and there is basically no reason to go there. I mean probes might do some interesting science if they can survive, but people clearly not. And Mars is a long term objective, one which will require advances in closed systems and advanced life support systems. The development of which I think are important goals for humanity's long term development. The moon is a good starting place though. Close enough to be feasible, hostile enough to be a good testing ground.
 
2013-06-18 01:36:28 PM
i40.tinypic.com
 
2013-06-18 01:38:24 PM
Mankind needs to be prepared to accept the reality that there is nowhere left to explore that is both feasible and useful.  This is, sadly, what I believe is the solution to Fermi's paradox: all the useful places to visit are so far away as to be unreachable.  Let's face it - unless Charon is actually a frozen mass relay, we aren't going anywhere or meeting anyone.

Most science fiction probably needs to be renamed "space fantasy".
 
2013-06-18 01:38:47 PM

Oerath: but honestly I don't see a lot of useful tech coming out of that. And again, no one wants to fund it.


And I don't see any useful tech coming out of yet another tin can in the upper atmosphere. Is it fun? Probably. And? So are flights in Mig-29s and I don't see the foaming at the mouth spittle about that.

Oerath: And Mars is a long term objective


And round and round we go.

Space is dead. You and KellyX just better put away the crap you were fed as a kid and grow up.

We were promised a lot back then, eh? Like nuclear power too cheap to meter! The leisure society! Oh my!
 
2013-06-18 01:39:44 PM
Mars will be a one way trip.

Still waiting for Moon Base Alpha..............
 
2013-06-18 01:44:26 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: You and KellyX just better put away the crap you were fed as a kid and grow up.


Wow. What dreams of yours were smashed by the difficulties of reality? Just because shiat is hard doesn't mean you should just give up on it. Are you always this much of a colossal dick? Or did you just decide to take a break from the Politics tab to swing by and yell at people who disagree with you about space travel?
 
2013-06-18 01:49:00 PM

Myria: There just isn't much worth visiting in our system.  They're all just deserted rocks and big balls of gas.

Lets say that we have astronauts land on Mars.  They'll have spent 2 years traveling, and finally get to open the door to step on Mars.  The first person to step there will just think, "I went all this way just to land in a desert?"  I bet a lot of science experiments they do will just confirm that there is but rock, much like our Moon.


If the trip to Mars took 2 years, the crew would be dead, using current tech.
 
2013-06-18 01:50:46 PM

Oerath: Quantum Apostrophe: That's your opinion. The same can be said of deep-sea diving. Why don't you try living in a volcano? That'll push technology along.

Deep sea diving probably will provide useful technologies, and is in some ways a good analog for space. Unfortunately considerably less people are interested in funding 6 month-2 year deep sea expeditions that would yield such technological results. And the volcano... well we both know what you were doing there, but honestly I don't see a lot of useful tech coming out of that. And again, no one wants to fund it.

simplicimus: Currently we have no technology that would make a trip to Mars anything but a one-way fatal excursion. We don't even have probes that can survive landing on Venus. Until our technology advances significantly, there's no point for manned trips to these planets. After our technology advances to that point, there's still no reason to Venus. Maybe Mars, depending on what the probes find.. The Moon makes the most sense if we want to set up a colony, if there were anything worth having there.,

Venus is a dead end, and there is basically no reason to go there. I mean probes might do some interesting science if they can survive, but people clearly not. And Mars is a long term objective, one which will require advances in closed systems and advanced life support systems. The development of which I think are important goals for humanity's long term development. The moon is a good starting place though. Close enough to be feasible, hostile enough to be a good testing ground.


A long term stay on the moon is probably a permanent stay, due to muscle and bone loss.
 
2013-06-18 01:52:52 PM

stevetherobot: What about the men being sent to Uranus?


They look FABULOUS!!!!
 
2013-06-18 01:54:01 PM
Can't believe I am going to wade in yet again, but I'm going to put in my $0.02 worth.

Quantum Apostrophe: Oerath: but it is very important from a technological perspective.

I don't believe that. I believe space was the apex of 20th century development, not the base.


It wasn't the base, and in some ways it was the apex because it was a damn hard thing to do, and required a lot of technological development to succeed, but it also provided spin off technology, which was what  Oerath's point was. Remote health telemetry is a great example and there are many others, including materials development, that have significantly added to non-space technologies and consumer goods. Would they have been developed otherwise? Hard to say really. Some probably would have eventually, some probably wouldn't have because space provided some unique environmental challenges. It was only after we developed technology for that purpose that other uses were found.

Which is how science works period. You're basically pushing a totally incorrect view of science and technological development, much like our Conservative government, that thinks the best science is directed R&D for commercial purposes. That is demonstrably not the case. Undirected basic science provides the base on which all innovation is built, often in unforeseen ways. As someone doing basic science and human health related science this is something I have a pretty good grasp of. Most of our medical advances rely heavily on non-directed research driven by simple curiosity.

Which is my larger point about manned space exploration. Doing science and exploring for its own sake is a valuable thing. And not everything can be done with probes and robots.

Oerath: he challenges of sending people into space and developing systems which can support and protect them provides a lot of collateral technology and pushes innovation in ways most other industries don't.

That's your opinion. The same can be said of deep-sea diving. Why don't you try living in a volcano? That'll push technology along. For what, I don't know. It's this kind of circular reasoning about space that I decry.

"We need to develop this technology for space because it will be used in space!"


Again you are off the mark. Developing technologies for surviving in space and supporting human life in that extreme habitat obviously has the direct benefit of doing what it was intended to do, but it can also have ancillary benefits in spin-off technology. This is pretty well documented. And space has a whole slew of challenges that deep sea diving doesn't. Building for immense pressure and building for a near vacuum are different. Trying to deal with debris and radiation are fairly unique environmental conditions. Especially if you are dealing with weight as a significant factor due to current launch constraints and cost.

Although developing technology and building infrastructure so that launch costs weren't as big of a factor would also be pretty useful in that regard. 

Oerath: but manned missions are still important.

They just aren't. It's a cargo cult at this point. Do the thrill rides privately and move on. The Space Age is as dead as disco.


We can't do all of the science we might want to do remotely, we just can't. People still have many huge advantages over unmanned probes and robots in that regard. And exploration for its own sake isn't a bad thing.

People in the 19th century thought Mars was inhabited with an advanced civilization. It just isn't. People moved on.

Then people thought the universe was the Milky Way. Nope. People moved on.

Then people thought Venus was a lush tropical paradise. Oops. People moved on.

Then people thought we'd build these enormous technological totem poles in the sky because technology.


I'd argue most of those weren't necessarily scientific thought, many of them were speculative from amateur astronomers and science fiction writers.
 
2013-06-18 01:58:19 PM

Oerath: What dreams of yours were smashed by the difficulties of reality?


Yours.

Oerath: Just because shiat is hard doesn't mean you should just give up on it.


That can be said about anything. It's pretty difficult to make a passenger jet out of uranium. You should give up on that not because it's hard, but because it's stupid, and even if you could you'd just kill everyone. See?

Oerath: Are you always this much of a colossal dick?


Tell it to the universe that has given us limited materials and energy sources. No one's going anywhere. And it's not my fault.

Oerath: Or did you just decide to take a break from the Politics tab to swing by and yell at people who disagree with you about space travel?


I think that if you were objective, you'd realize the only person yelling here is a Space Nutter. I'm still wiping the spittle from inside my monitor.

And pointing out reality is being dickish now?

There is no truth to the old canard of space being this source of technological wonders and better societies. If people believed that, you'd move to Russia or China.

There is nothing to be gained by having a few people float around at 0.1 Earth radii. This doesn't get us closer to anything at all. We can see better and further with ground-based instruments and automated disposable cameras we can toss into higher orbits.

You just attribute great heroic properties to something that is nothing more than political saber-rattling.

It's a reality show for nerds.
 
2013-06-18 01:58:56 PM
Assuming we solved the radiation problem, centripetal force can substitute for real gravity in the long run, and some advances in hydroponics. then go big and build a generational ship and visit a new solar system.
 
2013-06-18 02:02:36 PM

simplicimus: Assuming we solved the radiation problem, centripetal force can substitute for real gravity in the long run, and some advances in hydroponics. then go big and build a generational ship and visit a new solar system.


I know a bunch of experts in hydroponics here in California... =^-^=
 
2013-06-18 02:05:02 PM

simplicimus: Assuming we solved the radiation problem, centripetal force can substitute for real gravity in the long run, and some advances in hydroponics. then go big and build a generational ship and visit a new solar system.


Of course. Easy peasy.

Oh, and Oerath? You're not an atheist. You have deep faith that somehow space is this wonderful thing that brings endless bounty to the human race.

2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-06-18 02:07:42 PM
I live a few miles from a fountain of youth so I'm getting a kick out of this threadshiatting.
 
2013-06-18 02:14:25 PM

sxacho: I live a few miles from a fountain of youth so I'm getting a kick out of this threadshiatting.


Don't drink from it, that's unnatural. Warp drives, space elevators and Mars colonies are very natural, and will be enjoyed by middle-aged people who can barely fit into airplanes.

You already have a fountain of youth in your home. It's called a refrigerator. The implications of such a device, electricity, oil-powered industrial chemically-fertilized genetically-engineered global agriculture, knowledge of nutrition and germ theory, are a fountain of youth.

I expect you to stop using these things right away.

You wouldn't want to be inconsistent in your beliefs, hm?
 
2013-06-18 02:21:26 PM
Brilliant .. hire a PC bunch with zero plans of building a vehicle to put them anywhere.

Money g.d. well spent.
 
2013-06-18 02:25:34 PM

OnlyM3: Brilliant .. hire a PC bunch with zero plans of building a vehicle to put them anywhere.

Money g.d. well spent.


Can you point to a "where" for me? I am stupid and don't see it.

Let me help you:

physics.ucsd.edu

a) 600 km (low Earth orbit, 0.1 times the Earth radius)
b) 6,000 km (about the radius of the Earth)
c) 36,000 km (geosynchronous orbit; about 6 Earth radii)
d) 385,000 km (about the distance to the Moon; 60 Earth radii)
e) beyond the Moon
 
2013-06-18 02:33:27 PM

OnlyM3: Brilliant .. hire a PC bunch with zero plans of building a vehicle to put them anywhere.


Yes, if only there was a shuttle successor in the works. Oh wait.
 
2013-06-18 02:41:23 PM

bbfreak: OnlyM3: Brilliant .. hire a PC bunch with zero plans of building a vehicle to put them anywhere.

Yes, if only there was a shuttle successor in the works. Oh wait.


CGI != reality.

And how is space being explored by going up 0.1 Earth radii?

Again, I am stupid and need these obvious things explained to me.

It's like saying I am exploring the ocean because I dipped by toe at the beach.
 
2013-06-18 02:45:36 PM

stevetherobot: What about the men being sent to Uranus?


Tragically, most were injured in a training crash.  The doctor in charge reports that not only did it wreck them, it dang near killed them.
 
2013-06-18 02:55:07 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: bbfreak: OnlyM3: Brilliant .. hire a PC bunch with zero plans of building a vehicle to put them anywhere.

Yes, if only there was a shuttle successor in the works. Oh wait.

CGI != reality.


Last time I checked, one of those is not CGI

i.space.com
 
2013-06-18 03:18:21 PM

OnlyM3: Brilliant .. hire a PC bunch with zero plans of building a vehicle to put them anywhere.

Money g.d. well spent.


NASA has studies galore to send astronauts places.
Its also planning a system capable of sending them places.
...But the current political climate doesn't allow them to plan missions with destinations in mind.

/Hence the SLS "rocket to nowhere".
/Contractor palms gotta get greased but there's zero ambition to do anything beyond that.
/Private space has been more productive, but only so far as taking over shuttle duties.
 
2013-06-18 03:22:32 PM

Oerath: Quantum Apostrophe: You and KellyX just better put away the crap you were fed as a kid and grow up.

Wow. What dreams of yours were smashed by the difficulties of reality? Just because shiat is hard doesn't mean you should just give up on it. Are you always this much of a colossal dick? Or did you just decide to take a break from the Politics tab to swing by and yell at people who disagree with you about space travel?


I have QA farkied as 'anti tech troll.'

Threads like this show I was correct in my judgement.
 
2013-06-18 03:28:25 PM
Quantum Apostrophe: bbfreak: OnlyM3: Brilliant .. hire a PC bunch with zero plans of building a vehicle to put them anywhere.
Yes, if only there was a shuttle successor in the works. Oh wait.
CGI != reality.
And how is space being explored by going up 0.1 Earth radii?
Again, I am stupid and need these obvious things explained to me.
It's like saying I am exploring the ocean because I dipped by toe at the beach.


FSM knows I should know better than this. (sigh)

If we put people on Mars, perhaps the point isn't what we might find there or even the spin off technology that are derived. Maybe the point is that "we" are there.

Have you ever wondered why Sir Edmund Hillary climb Everest? Was the point of him making such an arduous journey to plant the flag of New Zealand at the top? I don't think so.

Maybe if we go to Mars, it's because we want to. Maybe, in another couple thousand years, if we leave the Solar system, it's because we want to.  Maybe if we become a space faring bunch of ape descendents, it's because we want to. Or maybe we should just stop dreaming and climb back into the trees because dreaming is for schmucks and space nutters, right QA?
 
2013-06-18 03:33:56 PM

SewerSquirrels: Quantum Apostrophe: bbfreak: OnlyM3: Brilliant .. hire a PC bunch with zero plans of building a vehicle to put them anywhere.
Yes, if only there was a shuttle successor in the works. Oh wait.
CGI != reality.
And how is space being explored by going up 0.1 Earth radii?
Again, I am stupid and need these obvious things explained to me.
It's like saying I am exploring the ocean because I dipped by toe at the beach.

FSM knows I should know better than this. (sigh)

If we put people on Mars, perhaps the point isn't what we might find there or even the spin off technology that are derived. Maybe the point is that "we" are there.

Have you ever wondered why Sir Edmund Hillary climb Everest? Was the point of him making such an arduous journey to plant the flag of New Zealand at the top? I don't think so.

Maybe if we go to Mars, it's because we want to. Maybe, in another couple thousand years, if we leave the Solar system, it's because we want to.  Maybe if we become a space faring bunch of ape descendents, it's because we want to. Or maybe we should just stop dreaming and climb back into the trees because dreaming is for schmucks and space nutters, right QA?


Those trees are filled with delicious, delicious nuts.  Wanting to abandon those tree nuts is what makes you a space nutter - because as much as you want it to be true, there are no nuts in space.
 
2013-06-18 03:38:47 PM
 Quantum Apostrophe:

Our sun is going to die someday.  If humanity wants to continue beyond that point, we had best figure out how to be somewhere else by then.
 
2013-06-18 03:48:01 PM

quizzical: Quantum Apostrophe:

Our sun is going to die someday.  If humanity wants to continue beyond that point, we had best figure out how to be somewhere else by then.


On that time scale, evolution is a much bigger issue. We may have crossed our selves with water bears by then.
 
2013-06-18 03:53:19 PM
And here he seemed so civil in the thread the other day.

/well, about as civil as this prick gets
 
2013-06-18 04:22:23 PM

quizzical: Quantum Apostrophe:

Our sun is going to die someday.  If humanity wants to continue beyond that point, we had best figure out how to be somewhere else by then.


Evolution is still happening. There won't be a human race far before that anyways. Unless you want to figure out how DNA works and make sure to keep it static?

Mentalpatient87: And here he seemed so civil in the thread the other day.

/well, about as civil as this prick gets


Not my fault your skin thickness is measured in quarks. If you had the conviction of your faith, a gadfly like me shouldn't bother you, eh?

rustypouch: Oerath: Quantum Apostrophe: You and KellyX just better put away the crap you were fed as a kid and grow up.

Wow. What dreams of yours were smashed by the difficulties of reality? Just because shiat is hard doesn't mean you should just give up on it. Are you always this much of a colossal dick? Or did you just decide to take a break from the Politics tab to swing by and yell at people who disagree with you about space travel?

I have QA farkied as 'anti tech troll.'

Threads like this show I was correct in my judgement.


Except that I am working on increasing the speed of a DDR3 bus and I am sitting between two high performance oscilloscopes. You?

And your other error is thinking that repeating the same old parlor trick is somehow "tech" after you've done it for nearly half a century.

But hey, let's keep pretending space isn't empty.

WippitGuud: Quantum Apostrophe: bbfreak: OnlyM3: Brilliant .. hire a PC bunch with zero plans of building a vehicle to put them anywhere.

Yes, if only there was a shuttle successor in the works. Oh wait.

CGI != reality.

Last time I checked, one of those is not CGI

[i.space.com image 575x431]


And that just leaves all my other points. What the hell is that ridiculous thing anyways? The unmanned freeze-dried oatmeal delivery van?

SewerSquirrels: Maybe if we go to Mars, it's because we want to.


Who is "we"? A bunch of delusional nerds? Who is this glorious "we" you keep referring to?

SewerSquirrels: Maybe, in another couple thousand years, if we leave the Solar system, it's because we want to.


I think the Solar System will still be the same size by then, ie, quite large and empty. And what do you care about what happens when you're dead? This is all starting to get religious again.

SewerSquirrels: Or maybe we should just stop dreaming and climb back into the trees because dreaming is for schmucks and space nutters, right QA?


Yes, these are the only options. Your simple-minded view of things is quite telling.

By your logic, any dream is valid and feasible, right? Or only yours is valid because it represents such emotional symbolism??
 
2013-06-18 04:26:50 PM

SewerSquirrels: If we put people on Mars, perhaps the point isn't what we might find there or even the spin off technology that are derived. Maybe the point is that "we" are there.


My belief is that it serves our social need to explore.
Nations that don't explore are doomed. People quickly realize that the lack of expansion means the loss of opportunity and growth.  They stop investing and creating, preparing for the inevitable collapse or moving to greener pastures.
By going to mountains, and even going to the moon, we forestall the effects of social decay.  We tease ourselves with the possibilities and give future generations something to work for.   We believe in the future because (by way of these missions) we experience our nations expansion.

The problem now is that the 60's moon promise is proving to be an empty one.
Missions based on theory have to become factual events, and those events have to lead to expansion.
People want to sample the frontier for themselves.
 
2013-06-18 04:33:21 PM

stevetherobot: What about the men being sent to Uranus?


I do need assistance eradicating some Klingons.
 
2013-06-18 04:34:09 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: [i.space.com image 575x431]

And that just leaves all my other points. What the hell is that ridiculous thing anyways? The unmanned freeze-dried oatmeal delivery van?


Yes. The unmanned freeze dried delivery van.

Your homework for tonight: compare how much cargo DragonX can carry compared to how much Soyuz can carry.

For extra credit, compare the cost-per-seat of Soyuz to the cost-per-seat when the DragonRider variant of DragonX is operational.
 
2013-06-18 04:49:44 PM

way south: My belief is that it serves our social need to explore.
Nations that don't explore are doomed. People quickly realize that the lack of expansion means the loss of opportunity and growth. They stop investing and creating, preparing for the inevitable collapse or moving to greener pastures.


Here's the problem: we're not going anywhere for the next hundred years, if ever.  We as humans need to learn to deal with this reality -- failure to adapt will break us.
 
2013-06-18 05:05:54 PM
TIL: SpaceX is planning to send one-way cargo modules to Mars starting in 2016, in preparation for human colonists.
 
2013-06-18 05:08:37 PM

WippitGuud: For extra credit, compare the cost-per-seat of Soyuz to the cost-per-seat when the DragonRider variant of DragonX is operational.


OK, as soon as you tell me why we need this. Without resorting to circular reasoning, and maybe answering these simple questions:

img.fark.net
How does going to point A help anything at all?

Assume Dragon X is free. Now what?

PS: "d" is the Moon. Let that sink in for a while.

way south: People quickly realize that the lack of expansion means the loss of opportunity and growth.


That has only been the social model for a few centuries. It will change. It will have to. We can live perfectly happy lives without the constant goading of cancerous growth for growth's sake. Children eventually stop growing. So will we. Children also eventually die. So will the human race.

Unless you want to learn how matter becomes life and how to monkey with that? Hm?

Nations that don't explore are doomed.

That makes no sense whatsoever, but the usual doom and gloom and darkly gothic romantic end-of-the-world angst is noted.

Myria: way south: My belief is that it serves our social need to explore.
Nations that don't explore are doomed. People quickly realize that the lack of expansion means the loss of opportunity and growth. They stop investing and creating, preparing for the inevitable collapse or moving to greener pastures.

Here's the problem: we're not going anywhere for the next hundred years, if ever.  We as humans need to learn to deal with this reality -- failure to adapt will break us.


No one wants to confront that reality. This space nonsense is the last gasp of our current social paradigm. Like the Pyramids, this will stand as a monument to ego.

It will also be completely ignored by future generations, or at best just be part of the background while the human race makes new arrangements right here.

No one is going anywhere. It's over. Finished. The limits of materials and energy sources make it so. No amount of hand-waving and desperate appeals to emotions will change that.

We have everything and everyone we need right here.
 
2013-06-18 05:16:40 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: And how is space being explored by going up 0.1 Earth radii?


Going further is exploring, as in physically exploring. I don't think you will find anyone who really supports manned space programs who thinks we should be stuck dickering around in LEO, quite the opposite in fact. But there continues to be valuable research done at the ISS.

Quantum Apostrophe: Evolution is still happening. There won't be a human race far before that anyways. Unless you want to figure out how DNA works and make sure to keep it static?


While we will continue to evolve, if we maintain as a stable population with lots of gene flow (which while we have multiple distinct populations now they have always had enough gene flow to keep us as a single species, and the amount of gene flow is greater now than ever) we will continue to be a single species.

Now if something happens that populations of people start going their different ways with enough separation to speciate...

Either way the definition of a "species" and whether our descendants, although genetically different from us would be a different species or not is more of a philosophical distinction based on our love of categorization than anything.

In other words, it is an irrelevant distinction in this case.
 
2013-06-18 05:18:35 PM

Myria: way south: My belief is that it serves our social need to explore.
Nations that don't explore are doomed. People quickly realize that the lack of expansion means the loss of opportunity and growth. They stop investing and creating, preparing for the inevitable collapse or moving to greener pastures.

Here's the problem: we're not going anywhere for the next hundred years, if ever.  We as humans need to learn to deal with this reality -- failure to adapt will break us.


Here's a thought, not everyone who thinks manned space exploration is worthwhile as a scientific endeavour thinks we will be living on the moon or mars anytime soon.
 
2013-06-18 05:27:01 PM

Myria: way south: My belief is that it serves our social need to explore.
Nations that don't explore are doomed. People quickly realize that the lack of expansion means the loss of opportunity and growth. They stop investing and creating, preparing for the inevitable collapse or moving to greener pastures.

Here's the problem: we're not going anywhere for the next hundred years, if ever.  We as humans need to learn to deal with this reality -- failure to adapt will break us.




On that I'm not so certain.
Humans will go places because its in our nature. The technology for space has proliferated and its become more affordable. The desire is there and we have more than a few good business, social, and political reasons to go. Someone is going to push the button and I don't think it will be very long from now before we're founding actual space colonies or long duration missions.

I'm not so sure that America will take part in this, because we're overdue for a collapse. We've got a failure of leadership and a crumbling society held in place by the house of cards that is wall street. NASA may never send another man into space on an American rocket.

...But that won't end space travel any more than the fall of Germany or the British empire ended mans desire to explore.
If you've got a nation hungry for expansion then its not like you've got anywhere else to go (that won't involve shooting people first).
 
2013-06-18 05:34:24 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: WippitGuud: For extra credit, compare the cost-per-seat of Soyuz to the cost-per-seat when the DragonRider variant of DragonX is operational.

OK, as soon as you tell me why we need this. Without resorting to circular reasoning, and maybe answering these simple questions:

[img.fark.net image 850x89]
How does going to point A help anything at all?


If you're going to try to get people out away from earth, you're going to need larger vehicles to do it. It is a lot easier to build the vehicle in LEO than to try to launch something capable of a 2 year flight from the ground. Building them in orbit also means they don't have to be build to actually survive the launch... the ISS certainly could not have

Assume Dragon X is free. Now what?

Now it becomes a lot easier to build those ships, ans it's free to get the materials in space. It's also means it's easier for the Red Dragon and Mars One Dragon capsules to start to be used.
 
2013-06-18 05:35:33 PM

entropic_existence: Here's a thought, not everyone who thinks manned space exploration is worthwhile as a scientific endeavour thinks we will be living on the moon or mars anytime soon.


That may be true, but "way south" was talking about how a lack of expansion is problematic.  Pure exploration isn't expansion.

Exploration needs to be considered--and budgeted--as a purely scientific and technological endeavor.
 
2013-06-18 06:28:54 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: WippitGuud: For extra credit, compare the cost-per-seat of Soyuz to the cost-per-seat when the DragonRider variant of DragonX is operational.

OK, as soon as you tell me why we need this. Without resorting to circular reasoning, and maybe answering these simple questions:

[img.fark.net image 850x89]
How does going to point A help anything at all?

Assume Dragon X is free. Now what?

PS: "d" is the Moon. Let that sink in for a while.

way south: People quickly realize that the lack of expansion means the loss of opportunity and growth.

That has only been the social model for a few centuries. It will change. It will have to. We can live perfectly happy lives without the constant goading of cancerous growth for growth's sake. Children eventually stop growing. So will we. Children also eventually die. So will the human race.

Unless you want to learn how matter becomes life and how to monkey with that? Hm?

Nations that don't explore are doomed.

That makes no sense whatsoever, but the usual doom and gloom and darkly gothic romantic end-of-the-world angst is noted.

Myria: way south: My belief is that it serves our social need to explore.
Nations that don't explore are doomed. People quickly realize that the lack of expansion means the loss of opportunity and growth. They stop investing and creating, preparing for the inevitable collapse or moving to greener pastures.

Here's the problem: we're not going anywhere for the next hundred years, if ever.  We as humans need to learn to deal with this reality -- failure to adapt will break us.

No one wants to confront that reality. This space nonsense is the last gasp of our current social paradigm. Like the Pyramids, this will stand as a monument to ego.

It will also be completely ignored by future generations, or at best just be part of the background while the human race makes new arrangements right here.

No one is going anywhere. It's over. Finished. The limits of materials and energy sources make it so. No amount of ...


Man, you are fixated. I do somewhat agree with you that manned space ATM won't give us much better chances to survive on other planets (although the spin-off products are beneficial), and that it is foolish of us to try to plan out a trip to other star systems right now, your overreaching, absolute, finalistic views are more ridiculous than those you perceive 'space nutters'. Who knows what kind of technology we will develop, even only in the next millennium? Scientists are already exploring the fringes of possibility of teleportation, and, as I'm sure you know, advances in life-extension/preservation are going on right now. Some day, almost certainly, we will be able to at least set up some sort of base or colony outside of Earth, and to assume otherwise is short-sighted.

In regards to your points about human kind not existing billions of years in the future, so what? Technically the human race won't likely exist, but some evolution of us, or maybe other terrestrial intelligent life will probably be present, so that point is essentially invalid.

And, what exactly, are the limits of energy and materials that will prevent our extraterrestrial expansion? Look at how far we have come only in the last century in these regards. More supermaterials are being developed, and fusion is a potentially a new source that will probably be used by the end of the century, at the most.
 
2013-06-18 06:36:01 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: Not my fault your skin thickness


My skin thickness, right. That's rich. I'm clearly the easily offended one here.
 
2013-06-18 06:57:21 PM
Damn, all the good jokes are gone.  Back in the day, trolling meant something.
 
2013-06-18 07:03:14 PM
Quantum Apostrophe:

Tell it to the universe that has given us limited materials and energy sources. No one's going anywhere. And it's not my fault.

But hey, let's keep pretending space isn't empty.


"It has been suggested that platinum, cobalt and other valuable elements from asteroids may be mined and sent to Earth for profit, used to build solar-power satellites and space habitats and water processed from ice to refuel orbiting propellant depots.

In fact, all the gold, cobalt, iron, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, osmium, palladium, platinum, rhenium, rhodium, ruthenium, and tungsten mined from Earth's crust, and that are essential for economic and technological progress, came originally from the rain of asteroids that hit Earth after the crust cooled."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asteroid_mining

So, no, space isn't empty.  And no, we don't have as limited supply as you suggest.  And, yes, we will be using your tax dollars to mine the asteroids.

/deal with it, lol
 
2013-06-18 07:04:55 PM

Myria: entropic_existence: Here's a thought, not everyone who thinks manned space exploration is worthwhile as a scientific endeavour thinks we will be living on the moon or mars anytime soon.

That may be true, but "way south" was talking about how a lack of expansion is problematic.  Pure exploration isn't expansion.

Exploration needs to be considered--and budgeted--as a purely scientific and technological endeavor.


I think ultimately, if we want to get in to extremely long-term planning (on the order of centuries or longer) expansion of some sort is a feasible and realistic goal. But we are talking very long-term planning, which unfortunately most people are really, really bad at. Especially politicians who think in terms of 4-year election cycles.

NASA is currently budgeted from a purely scientific and exploratory perspective. Well, actually it also gets some military consideration as well, which is is the largest science oriented budget item or department.  To put budget its in perspective, NASA currently receives0.48% of the federal budget. At the height of the space race, in 1966, it was4.41%.
 
2013-06-18 07:05:05 PM
We won't be able to get to another "class M" planet, and we won't colonize another planet, and we won't find people we can bone..er...talk to in space. But having a space program is awesome because so much useful science has come out of it. I'm all for useful science. NASA seems to be the only way we really can get useful science going without regard for the almighty dollar.

And to those of you on the snark train about how the women look, check in with us after you've gotten a PhD and gotten into the space program.
 
2013-06-18 07:15:13 PM

Myria: entropic_existence: Here's a thought, not everyone who thinks manned space exploration is worthwhile as a scientific endeavour thinks we will be living on the moon or mars anytime soon.

That may be true, but "way south" was talking about how a lack of expansion is problematic.  Pure exploration isn't expansion.

Exploration needs to be considered--and budgeted--as a purely scientific and technological endeavor.




If you want a bigger budget for science then you have to relate how that science relates to the lives of common folks. We understand exploration in the sense of "someday we'll go there". We understand science in the sense of "someday, this will make my life better".

Treated as purely scientific endeavor, something like Apollo becomes a monument instead of a mile mark. Its got to be brought home to the public so new horizons can be set.
 
2013-06-18 07:32:17 PM
It's amazing how much ignoring one user and posts that mention them clean up this thread.
 
2013-06-18 07:40:43 PM

way south: If you want a bigger budget for science then you have to relate how that science relates to the lives of common folks.


Not so much science per se, but the development needed to do the missions... and yes, "spin-off" arguments are complicated by the fact that most of these technologies would've been developed to commercial feasibility (and some aren't quite there yet) anyhow. But I don't think one can argue that their development wasn't greatly accelerated by their application to spaceflight, both manned and unmanned.

Fuel Cells
Compact Electronics
Aerogels
Large scale Friction Stir Welding
Failure Analysis techniques
Closed-System Recycling
Genderless Docking Fixtures
...
 
2013-06-18 07:41:03 PM

AndreMA: It's amazing how much ignoring one user and posts that mention them clean up this thread.


Yup. Also, Fark would be a better place if everyone ignored QA instead of fighting with him senselessly.
 
2013-06-18 07:53:56 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: WippitGuud: For extra credit, compare the cost-per-seat of Soyuz to the cost-per-seat when the DragonRider variant of DragonX is operational.

PS: "d" is the Moon. Let that sink in for a while.


Wow! That sure is a long way. You'd think it would take a lot more than 3 days to get there. But nope. Granted, Mars will be longer, but nothing ventured nothing gained. As long as there is a higher mountain, somebody is eventually going to climb it. (That, by the way, was metaphor.)

Why don't you run along and pick out some nice ocean front property on Pangaea just in case you figure out how to be immortal. Might I recommend not spending so much time pissing people off as a first step toward immortality.
 
2013-06-18 09:24:12 PM

bbfreak: AndreMA: It's amazing how much ignoring one user and posts that mention them clean up this thread.

Yup. Also, Fark would be a better place if everyone ignored QA instead of fighting with him senselessly.


QA is what makes Fark interesting, people trying to be part of a group, not so much.

/no offense
 
2013-06-18 10:15:11 PM

AlwaysRightBoy: QA is what makes Fark interesting, people trying to be part of a group, not so much.


Funny, I have that same reaction to UltraFark
 
2013-06-18 11:23:17 PM

AndreMA: AlwaysRightBoy: QA is what makes Fark interesting, people trying to be part of a group, not so much.

Funny, I have that same reaction meh


I know, no one here...


/actually, I'm just here for therapy
 
2013-06-19 07:03:37 AM

MayoBoy: stevetherobot: What about the men being sent to Uranus?

They look FABULOUS!!!!


joke never gets old.
 
2013-06-19 07:10:23 AM
I used to get angry at Quantum Apostrophe too.  These days though, I just pity him.  To be able to devote so much time to being an angry cynic is just incredibly sad.  Think about how shiatty the world appears to him.  These outbursts for attention and confrontation are probably the only thing that keeps him from slitting his wrists.
 
2013-06-19 10:01:50 AM
I don't get why QA keeps coming to these threads, honestly. Don't you have something better to do than have the same argument on the internet day in & day out?? No one is going to change their mind here.
 
2013-06-19 10:44:56 AM

Boudyro: I guess we live in the reality where Carter gets to be an astronaut.

Bright side no snakes in our brains.


I'm happy I wasn't the first one to think that when I saw the bottom right.

/Good thing she isn't being discriminated against because her reproductive organs are on the inside and not the outside.
 
2013-06-19 11:18:24 AM

the_colors: I don't get why QA keeps coming to these threads, honestly. Don't you have something better to do than have the same argument on the internet day in & day out?? No one is going to change their mind here.


I kind of understand.  I can bash Jay Cutler 3 times a day and enjoy it every time if there are that many threads.

Is it just me, or does Christina Hammock look like Weird Al?
 
2013-06-19 11:21:02 AM
Haha WOW Quantum Apostrophe hates space. Like, space raped his uncle hate. Is he this much of a tool at other times, or does his space racism bring it out of an otherwise innocuous dweeb, hm?
 
2013-06-19 03:05:16 PM
bbfreak

>>> OnlyM3: Brilliant .. hire a PC bunch with zero plans of building a vehicle to put them anywhere.

Yes, if only there was a shuttle successor in the works. Oh wait.

From your own farking link

"five of the possible successors"

Lets look at your list
CST-100 - A capsule. That's akin to buying a car-seat and w/o owning a car.

Dragon - Role: Placing humans and cargo into Low Earth orbit (Protip. Mars is not in LEO)

Dream Chaser - Role: Part of NASA's Commercial Crew Program to supply crew and cargo to the International Space Station (Again, only .5 AU short of the goal)

MPCV - A capsule. Another car-seat with no car.

Space vehicle Blue Origin - Again, you're not out of LEO yet.

Got another list you can impress us with?

Finally your straw man about a shuttle replacement is a lie from the get go as I didn't call for such a critter. LEO isn't anywhere near Mars ... in case you missed that.
 
2013-06-19 03:10:19 PM
WippitGuud

>>> CGI != reality.

Last time I checked, one of those is not CGI

True. That isn't CGI. It's a very small pick-up truck.

Now two quick questions for you.
1) How many astronauts is that carrying? (Hint: Less than 1)

2) In regards to the quote in the article from NASA Administrator Charles Bolden "... these new candidates will help lead the first human mission to an asteroid"

Please provide the heavy lifter program that will put them there. Your friends have tried, but so far failed to provide anything substantial.
 
2013-06-19 03:22:32 PM

OnlyM3: bbfreak

>>> OnlyM3: Brilliant .. hire a PC bunch with zero plans of building a vehicle to put them anywhere.

Yes, if only there was a shuttle successor in the works. Oh wait.
From your own farking link

"five of the possible successors"

Lets look at your list
CST-100 - A capsule. That's akin to buying a car-seat and w/o owning a car.

Dragon - Role: Placing humans and cargo into Low Earth orbit (Protip. Mars is not in LEO)

Dream Chaser - Role: Part of NASA's Commercial Crew Program to supply crew and cargo to the International Space Station (Again, only .5 AU short of the goal)

MPCV - A capsule. Another car-seat with no car.

Space vehicle Blue Origin - Again, you're not out of LEO yet.

Got another list you can impress us with?

Finally your straw man about a shuttle replacement is a lie from the get go as I didn't call for such a critter. LEO isn't anywhere near Mars ... in case you missed that.

OnlyM3: Brilliant .. hire a PC bunch with zero plans of building a vehicle to put them anywhere.


You didn't mention anything about Mars, you specifically said that we don't have any plans of building a vehicle to put them anywhere. ISS/Low earth orbit is somewhere even if you disagree. Also, not sure what kind of spacecraft you're expecting. Both Orion & Dragon could send humans to Mars, just a matter of the will to do so. Indeed, Elon Musk has plans to do so with or without NASA. Whether he gets that far we'll see, but the idea that we're doing nothing is just silly.
 
2013-06-19 03:31:11 PM
bbfreak:
You didn't mention anything about Mars, you specifically said that we don't have any plans of building a vehicle to put them anywhere. ISS/Low earth orbit is somewhere even if you disagree. Also, not sure what kind of spacecraft you're expecting. Both Orion & Dragon could send humans to Mars, just a matter of the will to do so. Indeed, Elon Musk has plans to do so with or without NASA. Whether he gets that far we'll see, but the idea that we're doing nothing is just silly.

There are less difficult ways to commit suicide than from exposure to cosmic radiation on a trip to Mars.
 
2013-06-19 03:38:22 PM

simplicimus: bbfreak:
You didn't mention anything about Mars, you specifically said that we don't have any plans of building a vehicle to put them anywhere. ISS/Low earth orbit is somewhere even if you disagree. Also, not sure what kind of spacecraft you're expecting. Both Orion & Dragon could send humans to Mars, just a matter of the will to do so. Indeed, Elon Musk has plans to do so with or without NASA. Whether he gets that far we'll see, but the idea that we're doing nothing is just silly.

There are less difficult ways to commit suicide than from exposure to cosmic radiation on a trip to Mars.


Eh. At one time crossing the oceans was a suicide trip, but we found a way to do so anyway. Same with flying, going to the moon, etc.
 
2013-06-19 03:51:58 PM

bbfreak: simplicimus: bbfreak:
You didn't mention anything about Mars, you specifically said that we don't have any plans of building a vehicle to put them anywhere. ISS/Low earth orbit is somewhere even if you disagree. Also, not sure what kind of spacecraft you're expecting. Both Orion & Dragon could send humans to Mars, just a matter of the will to do so. Indeed, Elon Musk has plans to do so with or without NASA. Whether he gets that far we'll see, but the idea that we're doing nothing is just silly.

There are less difficult ways to commit suicide than from exposure to cosmic radiation on a trip to Mars.

Eh. At one time crossing the oceans was a suicide trip, but we found a way to do so anyway. Same with flying, going to the moon, etc.


No doubt, but there's a lot of tech we'll need that doesn't exist yet, and probably won't exist for a long time.
 
2013-06-19 04:02:51 PM

simplicimus: bbfreak: simplicimus: bbfreak:
You didn't mention anything about Mars, you specifically said that we don't have any plans of building a vehicle to put them anywhere. ISS/Low earth orbit is somewhere even if you disagree. Also, not sure what kind of spacecraft you're expecting. Both Orion & Dragon could send humans to Mars, just a matter of the will to do so. Indeed, Elon Musk has plans to do so with or without NASA. Whether he gets that far we'll see, but the idea that we're doing nothing is just silly.

There are less difficult ways to commit suicide than from exposure to cosmic radiation on a trip to Mars.

Eh. At one time crossing the oceans was a suicide trip, but we found a way to do so anyway. Same with flying, going to the moon, etc.

No doubt, but there's a lot of tech we'll need that doesn't exist yet, and probably won't exist for a long time.


Well we haven't really tried yet, but in my opinion we humans are at our best when we push the limits of what is possible.
 
2013-06-19 10:25:24 PM

bbfreak: simplicimus: bbfreak:
You didn't mention anything about Mars, you specifically said that we don't have any plans of building a vehicle to put them anywhere. ISS/Low earth orbit is somewhere even if you disagree. Also, not sure what kind of spacecraft you're expecting. Both Orion & Dragon could send humans to Mars, just a matter of the will to do so. Indeed, Elon Musk has plans to do so with or without NASA. Whether he gets that far we'll see, but the idea that we're doing nothing is just silly.

There are less difficult ways to commit suicide than from exposure to cosmic radiation on a trip to Mars.

Eh. At one time crossing the oceans was a suicide trip, but we found a way to do so anyway. Same with flying, going to the moon, etc.


People need to stop trotting out this line. The current estimates are that you would get a lot more radiation exposure than what NASA's operating guidelines are, but barring certain events, like a solar eruption, that would put out massive amounts of cosmic radiation (which was a potential problem for the moon too), the astronauts wouldn't die or get radiation poisoning. They would have an elevated (but not super high) risk of various cancers, and you probably wouldn't want to have kids after the trip. But it isn't a suicide by radiation event.
 
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