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(Kickstarter)   One day, gamers will be the most fit people in the world   (kickstarter.com) divider line 3
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3821 clicks; posted to Geek » on 17 Jun 2013 at 2:12 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-06-17 02:42:04 PM
2 votes:
Motion controls have bugged me for a while, but I could never really explain why. Eventually Yahtzee wrote a column cleared it up for me.

If you imagine a theoretical "perfect" video game, it would be one in which your thoughts directly control your character, without any input from your body. It would be sort of like the Matrix; Mario would jump as soon as you want him to, thus allowing him to feel like an extension of yourself. Just as your thoughts directly control your body, your thoughts would control your game character, making it feel like they are you are them.

What you never saw in the Matrix was the people in those chairs punching and kicking the air. That would be stupid; while their avatars in the Matrix would connect with an Agent and stop, in the real world they would hit nothing, ruining the immersion.

That's why using your own body movements to control a videogame never feels natural; no physical feedback.  And you are adding an unnecessary middleman; your mind controls your body, which is read by a sensor, which tries (with mixed success) to interpret what it senses into simple videogame commands, which it then executes. And the capabilities of your game character are nothing like your own; hopping to make Mario jump wouldn't feel right, because you'd jump a couple of inches, and he jumps eight feet.

Holding a controller is actually more immersive, because twitching your thumb a fraction of an inch is much closer to simply having your thoughts control the action onscreen than flailing around in front of a sensor is. To put it another way, dreams feel completely real even though your body lies still. If you ever do something in a dream that causes a physical response, like a "jump dream", it usually wakes you right up.
2013-06-17 02:51:55 PM
1 votes:

Wade_Wilson: Motion controls have bugged me for a while, but I could never really explain why. Eventually Yahtzee wrote a column cleared it up for me.

If you imagine a theoretical "perfect" video game, it would be one in which your thoughts directly control your character, without any input from your body. It would be sort of like the Matrix; Mario would jump as soon as you want him to, thus allowing him to feel like an extension of yourself. Just as your thoughts directly control your body, your thoughts would control your game character, making it feel like they are you are them.

What you never saw in the Matrix was the people in those chairs punching and kicking the air. That would be stupid; while their avatars in the Matrix would connect with an Agent and stop, in the real world they would hit nothing, ruining the immersion.

That's why using your own body movements to control a videogame never feels natural; no physical feedback.  And you are adding an unnecessary middleman; your mind controls your body, which is read by a sensor, which tries (with mixed success) to interpret what it senses into simple videogame commands, which it then executes. And the capabilities of your game character are nothing like your own; hopping to make Mario jump wouldn't feel right, because you'd jump a couple of inches, and he jumps eight feet.

Holding a controller is actually more immersive, because twitching your thumb a fraction of an inch is much closer to simply having your thoughts control the action onscreen than flailing around in front of a sensor is. To put it another way, dreams feel completely real even though your body lies still. If you ever do something in a dream that causes a physical response, like a "jump dream", it usually wakes you right up.


I actually agree with you, but as soon as I got the Rift my opinion changed slightly.  The change in perspective makes all the difference when it comes to SOME motion controls, not all.  I've played TF2 & Zombies on the Holodeck using the mouse/keyboard, 360 controller, and Razer Hydra - and of the three the Razer Hydra was the most natural and felt the best.

As far as my view was concerned, I'd look down and see myself holding a gun in the game.  My hand was gripping the hydra which, since I couldn't actually see, just felt like I was holding a pistol.  I'd point and shoot and where my arm was in the virtual world matched up with where I'd expect my arm to be in the real world.  The effect was great and vastly superior to a normal control scheme in that instance.

Where motion controls would suffer would be, as you mention, anything where you expect feedback or to hit an object.  Shooting a bow and arrow, firing a gun, they're all perfect for motion controls when combined with the Rift.

The Virtuix treadmill on its own without the Rift will be unsatisfying, with the Rift it will be ideal for anything where you the avatar have to "walk."  When playing those games now on the Rift standing or sitting in a chair or on my couch, I feel odd because my brain thinks I SHOULD be walking, moving my legs, but I'm not.
2013-06-17 02:37:09 PM
1 votes:
Safety is important. The safety ring supports up to 285lbs (130kg) with a safety factor 2. The belt assembly will prevent the user from slipping and falling down.

There's yer problem.
 
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