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(Guardian)   GCHQ, MI6 spy on G8 for HMG. They also pronounce "garage" funny   (guardian.co.uk) divider line 55
    More: Scary, G20 summit, summit meetings, Russian leaders, remote servers, garage, computer surveillance  
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3644 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Jun 2013 at 10:17 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



55 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-06-17 08:39:43 AM  
Why is this scary?  Monitoring the activities of foreign governments is what government SIGINT organizations are *SUPPOSED* to do, instead of monitoring their own citizens.
 
2013-06-17 08:55:02 AM  
Can't wait for the response by the other G8 politicians.
 
2013-06-17 09:58:27 AM  
No one is shocked by this

Everyone does it

Its just not talked about.

Spies were doing their job.

All is fair in the spy game
 
2013-06-17 10:21:35 AM  
So did they catch Putin plotting against Moose and Squirrel?
 
2013-06-17 10:22:23 AM  

cman: No one is shocked by this

Everyone does it

Its just not talked about.

Spies were doing their job.

All is fair in the spy game


^^THIS^^

Does subby honestly believe that no other nation hosting the G8 or any other summit spies on the foreign government officials attending?
 
2013-06-17 10:25:29 AM  
I'm actually more shocked that any foreign government agency worker would be stupid enough to put anything in unencrypted email while travelling to a friendly* country.

* For some value of friendly.
 
2013-06-17 10:31:37 AM  
Yes, that's what MI6 is for.

Sonneillon: I'm actually more shocked that any foreign government agency worker would be stupid enough to put anything in unencrypted email while travelling to a friendly* country.

* For some value of friendly.


I find it hard to believe that 'shocked' is the word you're looking for here.
 
2013-06-17 10:36:16 AM  
Squadron Leader Hogg: Can I help you old boy?

John Steed: [disguised as Squadron Leader, complete with outlandish R.A.F. moustache] Actually, I wanted a word or 5 with Group Captain Miles.

Squadron Leader Hogg: Out, I'm afraid.

John Steed: Oh bad show,
[holds out his hand]
John Steed: Squadron Leader Blue.

Squadron Leader Hogg: Squad Leader Hogg, anything I can do?

[they shake hands]

John Steed: Actually, I wanted a word or 2 about the old Groupee, official magazine you know, I'm acting as P.R.O.

Squadron Leader Hogg: From the H.Q.?

John Steed: B.H.Q.

Squadron Leader Hogg: On T.T.R?

John Steed: J.J.V. seconded from R.H.B.

Squadron Leader Hogg: Oh really, how's the G.C.M.?

John Steed: A-1.

Squadron Leader Hogg: M-Y?

John Steed: 50 P.P.R.

Squadron Leader Hogg: [chuckles] Downgraded to 007, eh?

John Steed: Upgraded to B.B.5.

Squadron Leader Hogg: Oh, got his G.G.Q. then? How's the C.O.?

John Steed: [stops smiling] O.K.

Squadron Leader Hogg: Oh.
[pause]
Squadron Leader Hogg: Bang on.
 
2013-06-17 10:39:21 AM  
Hey, remember that time that an innocent, private citizens's personal information was spread around by a government agency?  What's that?  It's never happens?  The government doesn't actually care enough about 99.999% of us to dig into our business?  That's crazy talk!
 
2013-06-17 10:42:05 AM  

Sonneillon: I'm actually more shocked that any foreign government agency worker would be stupid enough to put anything in unencrypted email while travelling to a friendly* country.

* For some value of friendly.



Or apparently use an "internet cafe" for communication.

The spying must have been on the tech-unsavvy end of the G8. Even most middling listed companies won't let you email outside your specific issued laptop and VPN, nevermind a government.
 
2013-06-17 10:45:23 AM  
It's a car hole!
 
2013-06-17 10:47:09 AM  

dittybopper: Why is this scary?  Monitoring the activities of foreign governments is what government SIGINT organizations are *SUPPOSED* to do, instead of monitoring their own citizens.


I guess it's that they are risking a relationship with an ally. Turkey, in particular, could chill quickly.

When the intelligence apparatus gets to be of a certain size it makes it all but impossible to manage leaks.  Those leaks will break trust between allies and give enemies something to parade around.
 
2013-06-17 10:49:45 AM  
OMG BBQ MY BFF JILL?
 
2013-06-17 10:51:44 AM  

ipsofacto: OMG BBQ MY BFF JILL?


Jill is a G8/20 representative?
 
2013-06-17 10:52:59 AM  
At least they aren't operating a counterfeit jeans ring out of my carhole.
 
2013-06-17 10:57:56 AM  
I wonder if this would be an NSA staffer leaking this to the Guardian to make the case for "everyone does it"?

</conspiracy theory>
 
2013-06-17 11:03:06 AM  
It's a CAR HOLD! dammit.
 
2013-06-17 11:23:19 AM  

uber humper: I guess it's that they are risking a relationship with an ally. Turkey, in particular, could chill quickly.


It's not as if Turkey has anything important going on at the moment that they're desperate to distract the world's attention from
 
2013-06-17 11:25:24 AM  

uber humper


I guess it's that they are risking a relationship with an ally. Turkey, in particular, could chill quickly.


It can be very difficult to go cold Turkey.
 
2013-06-17 11:28:53 AM  
www.cardinalfang.net
Knows something about unconventional pronunciations.
 
2013-06-17 11:43:22 AM  

Phil Moskowitz: It's a CAR HOLD! dammit.


Now explain "Schedule"
 
2013-06-17 11:48:08 AM  

uber humper: dittybopper: Why is this scary?  Monitoring the activities of foreign governments is what government SIGINT organizations are *SUPPOSED* to do, instead of monitoring their own citizens.

I guess it's that they are risking a relationship with an ally. Turkey, in particular, could chill quickly.

When the intelligence apparatus gets to be of a certain size it makes it all but impossible to manage leaks.  Those leaks will break trust between allies and give enemies something to parade around.


You're acting like this is something new.   This is something that has been going on for centuries.  Literally.  It's understood that it happens.  Governments do try to be discreet about it, not to avoid embarrassment, but to preserve any advantage they might derive from the information:  If an opponent knows you are doing X, Y, and Z to monitor them, they can take steps to counteract that, and you lose whatever advantage you may have had.

And yes, it *CAN* make a difference:  We were able to hold the Japanese to their lowest acceptable tonnage ratio at the Washington Naval Conference in the early 1920's because we were reading their diplomatic codes, and thus we knew exactly their lowest acceptable ratio, and we simply kept at it until they essentially folded and accepted what was for them relatively unfavorable terms.
 
2013-06-17 11:48:41 AM  
This is an advantage to maturity. I've known this stuff since the mid 1970s. For pity's sake, GCHQ and CIA have had an arrangement since the mid 1950s. GCHQ would spy on Americans and CIA would spy on Brits. Then exchange 'tapes' (magnetic tapes back in the day).

This handily got around our 4th Amendment. CIA could stand before Congress and testify, truthfully though parsed that they were not spying on US Citizens.

In the 60 years since I imagine they've come up with even more 'judge approved' methods of doing as they like while grinning at the Constituion.
 
2013-06-17 11:50:33 AM  
Why is Subby scared?
 
2013-06-17 11:55:41 AM  
Where I come from (originally New Brunswick, Canada), many people pronounce "garage" as "gradge".

Where the "d" came from, I do not know. Presumably the "r" swapped places with the preceding vowel (as the "r" is wont to do in words such as "perfessor" and then the "d" showed up out of nowhere because "grage" was too effete for such a common, manly word. Educated and grammatically correct people pronounce it "gah rage" with the "rage" pronounced as "Raj" or as in French (with a longer "a"). The British pronunciation is worse than "grage" and if anybody tries it on where I come from, a large mob of "d's" will show up and beat the word senseless.

Several centuries of American, Canadian and British pronunciation and usage are at war in New Brunswick (as in many places in the Atlantic Provinces of Canada). American seems to be winning along the border with Maine--the accent is getting more American, but harsher also, so it grates on you even more than Maine Yankee at its worst.

Some of the peculiarities are probably from Ireland as there was a major influx of Irish settlers from Northern Ireland before the Great Potato Famine and Roman Catholic Irish. Some of the odder traits of usage are unique. There can be local differences due to settlements being formed by people from the same place in Scotland, Ireland, England, or where ever.  I suspect there may be pockets of Old Colonial American, largely untouched by the considerable changes that have taken place elsewhere since the Revolution, and it wouldn't surprise me if the large Yorkshire immigration left broad Northern traces on speech.
 
2013-06-17 11:55:59 AM  
Real spies from GCHQ communicate using subtle signals from the cover of magazines they control. Note: the barcode lower right actually refers to a dead drop in Brighton.

encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com
 
2013-06-17 11:57:24 AM  
You know, I'm getting excited about all this government spying...it's like we're living in a 60's spy movie.
 
2013-06-17 12:05:01 PM  

dennysgod: You know, I'm getting excited about all this government spying...it's like we're living in a 60's spy movie.


I just want frickin' sharks at my frickin' Applebees... or something.
 
2013-06-17 12:09:12 PM  
25.media.tumblr.com

It's definitely "not news"
 
2013-06-17 12:11:39 PM  
I guess some people are still trying to angle a way for Snowden to be a hero of some kind...

I still think he's an attention whore...
 
2013-06-17 12:11:48 PM  
Jag-u-ar!
 
2013-06-17 12:12:36 PM  
We're going to need a bigger duffel bag.
 
2013-06-17 12:13:07 PM  
I would assume the foreign dignitaries are aware of this and are spreading misinformation at these special internet cafes.
 
2013-06-17 12:14:07 PM  
first time i heard one those types say, meet me by the BP garage, i thought he said BP carriage.

was like... um, wtf...
 
2013-06-17 12:19:30 PM  
Farking Britain.

It's Hegemony Lite.

Be in control but have big dumb America be out front.
 
2013-06-17 12:23:25 PM  
i500.listal.com

Is not impressed.
 
2013-06-17 12:25:26 PM  
Um... Hooray for our side?
 
2013-06-17 12:34:26 PM  

cman: No one is shocked by this

Everyone does it

Its just not talked about.

Spies were doing their job.

All is fair in the spy game


www.mi6-hq.com
YEAH, BABY!!!
 
2013-06-17 12:37:11 PM  

offmymeds


YEAH, BABY!!!


Why would you post a pic of an impersonator? Are there no pictures of Mike Meyers on the 'tubes?
 
2013-06-17 12:40:57 PM  
Even on my smart phone I can set up a VPN, as flaky as it is sometimes. I'm surprised anyone in an official's delegation would be allowed to use an internet cafe for sensitive communications.
 
2013-06-17 12:43:33 PM  
Ok, if you're using an internet cafe's connection to send any kind of remotely sensitive information, you are a moron and deserve to be spied on.
 
2013-06-17 12:45:13 PM  

Englebert Slaptyback: offmymeds

YEAH, BABY!!!


Why would you post a pic of an impersonator? Are there no pictures of Mike Meyers on the 'tubes?


Sorry. Guess I picked an image of a mole.

24.media.tumblr.com
 
2013-06-17 12:48:08 PM  
 
2013-06-17 12:58:29 PM  
every nation does it and some go further than others to accomplish the job.
Its a big game of how to spah and how to counter spahs. Honestly the crap they detail would only get incompetent/ignorant officials.
However the etiquette is don't get caught.
 
2013-06-17 01:00:55 PM  

skinink: Even on my smart phone I can set up a VPN, as flaky as it is sometimes. I'm surprised anyone in an official's delegation would be allowed to use an internet cafe for sensitive communications.


Do you honestly think that's going to somehow protect you against GCHQ or the NSA?  Really?

Also, diplomats tend to be stupid, and despite being briefed, are generally not as security conscious as their home states might like.  That's because diplomats are politicians, not security weenies.  They sometimes do stupid things.  I'd be surprised if any diplomat could tell you what 'VPN' stands for.

Besides which, official communications to and from the diplomats will go through the embassy.  That's a given, and those communications are almost certainly as well protected as you can get.

What's happening in this case is that GCHQ is hoping that diplomats, or especially minor functionaries, will let something slip while talking to their wives, etc. back home.
 
2013-06-17 01:01:12 PM  
Say it with me: a-lu-min-um.
 
2013-06-17 01:03:31 PM  

dittybopper: skinink: Even on my smart phone I can set up a VPN, as flaky as it is sometimes. I'm surprised anyone in an official's delegation would be allowed to use an internet cafe for sensitive communications.

Do you honestly think that's going to somehow protect you against GCHQ or the NSA?  Really?

Also, diplomats tend to be stupid, and despite being briefed, are generally not as security conscious as their home states might like.  That's because diplomats are politicians, not security weenies.  They sometimes do stupid things.  I'd be surprised if any diplomat could tell you what 'VPN' stands for.

Besides which, official communications to and from the diplomats will go through the embassy.  That's a given, and those communications are almost certainly as well protected as you can get.

What's happening in this case is that GCHQ is hoping that diplomats, or especially minor functionaries, will let something slip while talking to their wives, etc. back home.


the other thing that's important: diplomats are useless.  they're just someone's returned favor for shelling out campaign funds.  they don't really do anything other than go to dinner with important people.
 
2013-06-17 02:00:48 PM  

lifeboat: Say it with me: a-lu-min-um.


Al-ew-mini-yum
 
2013-06-17 02:15:00 PM  
Came for Gay-rodge. Leaving.

/dnrtfa
/dnrtft
 
2013-06-17 02:19:55 PM  

InfrasonicTom: lifeboat: Say it with me: a-lu-min-um.

Al-Yew-mini-yum


FTFY.  The Brits take their yew seriously.
 
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