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(Daily Mail)   Old and busted: Living in a $1500 van while getting a graduate degree at Duke. New hotness: Living in a £800 yacht while getting a masters degree at Aberystwyth University   (dailymail.co.uk ) divider line
    More: Cool, Aberystwyth University, postgraduate degrees, North Wales, Isle of Wight  
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11940 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Jun 2013 at 8:13 AM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-06-17 03:37:57 PM  

AverageAmericanGuy: Those docks have showers?


See, what you do is you use this thing called "Google" and it tells you about www.ynyslasboatyard.co.uk and you go there and you click on "Moorings" and you find

Amenities
Toilet and shower facilities accessible 24hours per day.
 
2013-06-17 03:39:09 PM  

EvilEgg: You don't get a yacht for 800 you get a boat.  How much does he pay in slip fees and other sundry costs associated with keeping a boat?


FTFA: 'Everyone at the boatyard was really helpful and helped me fix parts of the boat as I had no DIY experience. It only cost £1 a day to keep it there.
 
2013-06-17 03:41:47 PM  

orbister: dittybopper: . That's not a yacht.  It's a sailboat.  If it cost less than a decent used car, it's not a 'yacht'.

If you can sleep in it without putting a tent up, it's a yacht. It may or may not also be a sailing boat.


So is this a 'yacht'?:

farm4.staticflickr.com
 
2013-06-17 04:01:35 PM  

dittybopper: So is this a 'yacht'?:


If used solely for pleasure purposes, yeah, why not?
 
2013-06-17 04:05:10 PM  

orbister: dittybopper: So is this a 'yacht'?:

If used solely for pleasure purposes, yeah, why not?


Yes, well, I *AM* the U-boat Commander of Love, so sure, I guess it would qualify.
 
2013-06-17 04:37:15 PM  

dittybopper: orbister: dittybopper: So is this a 'yacht'?:

If used solely for pleasure purposes, yeah, why not?

Yes, well, I *AM* the U-boat Commander of Love, so sure, I guess it would qualify.


I detect convergence with the "What not to say during sex" thread.

/one ping
 
2013-06-17 04:54:55 PM  
This is one of those quaint things that happens in university towns set on rivers. I remember there being a human interest piece a few years back on a bunch of students who were living in a moored sailboat just down from the Queensland University of Technology in the central business district of Brisbane. I don't know if they're still there- if they weren't, maybe their presence would have prevented a recent attack on a homeless dude in the area under the Riverside Expressway where they were moored.
 
2013-06-17 05:40:33 PM  
I've heard that the worst thing about living in a boat 365 is the spiders. For some reason, boats are FULL of spiders.
 
2013-06-18 11:57:17 AM  

FarkinNortherner: gweilo8888: I don't believe for one second that he spent less living in a boat -- even a ratty one like that -- than he'd have spent on a room of similar size and condition somewhere equally out of the way.

I do - although there are obviously boat-specific costs you'd struggle to find a room in a shared house for less than £30 a week, I pay £87 pcm to power my entire house (and my bathroom is bigger than his boat.)


Your bathroom is also in an insulated building, not in an uninsulated boat in a place where the average *highs* are in the 40s for five months of the year, and the average lows are in the 30s for six months of the year.

dittybopper: He would have spent most of his time on the campus of the university, so his power requirements would be pretty minimal except on the weekends.  LED lighting is pretty efficient, and even regular lighting isn't going to be an issue during the day, in a boat that small.


I don't believe for one second that he retrofitted the clapheap with LED lighting.

Also, looking on Google Earth, the boat yard where he kept it is, to put it mildly, rather sparse in it's facilities.  Those pictures in the article were taken at the Isle of Wight, so it's conceivable that he didn't have things like the "large" LCD panel (I only saw 1) you mention, but even if he did, he wouldn't have had much use for it during the day.

Even if he didn't have that specific LCD panel, he needed some way of powering the things every student either needs, or pretends to need. (A laptop computer, iPod, phone, whatever else.)

He had to bike the 8 miles to school.  Google maps says it's an hour ride (minimum route is 56 minutes, longest is 1 hour 23 minutes).  So that's 2 hours a day he's on the bike, outside of the time he spent at school.  Since he'd being doing almost all of his actual school work at school*, the time spent on the boat would be largely limited to evening recreation and sleeping.  Really, all he needed was the ability to power the boat for a handful of hours a day most of the time.   Cooking is by some sort of gas stove, he has a diesel generator/engine on board, and a solar panel to trickle charge the battery during the day when he's not there.   Depending on how much electricity he used, he might only need to use a gallon or two of diesel a week, if that.

And to heat the boat, which is by its very nature not efficient to heat. (But a sleeping bag in *average* lows of mid 30s for six months of the year ain't going to cut it.)

Also, have you *been* to the UK? Having a solar panel in the UK is not much more useful than having snow shoes in the Sahara. And that goes doubly so for Wales, which has a rainier, cloudier climate than the rest of the UK. For half the year in Wales, you will average less than 3.5 hours of sunshine per day, and for a third of the year you'll average around 90 minutes of sunshine per day. (And that's British winter sunshine, which is low and cool.) For the half of the year where he needs the most power to try and keep himself warm, his solar panel will do the square root of bugger all. (And it's funny how you assume he didn't have the LCD panel until he moved the boat, but had the solar panel all along on a boat that was clearly a junker when he was a pauper student.

And then he has to keep the boat floating. It's clearly in rough shape and likely leaks like a sieve, which means a bilge pump running all day. That means running the generator at regular, extended intervals to recharge a car battery from which to run the bilge pump, since the solar panel will be of next to no use for half the year. Let the battery run low and you find home sitting under eight feet of water.

I find it eminently believable that his shelter/utility expenses were less than he could have maintained closer to campus.

I didn't say they weren't less expensive than a dorm on campus. I said they weren't less expensive than a room in an apartment the same distance away from campus that the boat was.

*Looking at where he docked on Google Earth, I'm guessing he didn't have internet connectivity there.

Yes. Internet can only be had through cables. It's a shame that nobody has invented satellite internet, or phones capable of going online. At least, not in 1993, where you're apparently stuck.

Also, it is clearly impossible to study without internet connectivity. It's a well-known fact that laptop computers stop working when you're offline. (And not just the Chromebook.) And by 1993, where you're permanently lodged, paper books and other study aids had gone completely out of production.

Realistically, I would be willing to put money he lived off shore power (and a not-insignificant amount of the stuff, to heat and float an arthritic sailing sieve in the Welsh climate, and that the Fail has just ignored those costs in its effort to portray all students as layabouts who should've gotten bootstrappy and lived free of charge on the open seas whilst working seventeen jobs to ensure they didn't have a loan, like our hero for this fictitious account.
 
2013-06-18 02:27:00 PM  

gweilo8888: And to heat the boat, which is by its very nature not efficient to heat. (But a sleeping bag in *average* lows of mid 30s for six months of the year ain't going to cut it.)


Why not?  When I was a teen, I lived in a house that didn't have any heat upstairs at all, in the Adirondack Mountains of New York State where the temperature dips below -20 degrees F most years.  The record is -35, and the *AVERAGE* temp for both January and February is in the single digits.  If I left a glass of water out on my nightstand, it had a film of ice on it the next morning on the coldest days, meaning my room was below freezing.  During the winter, I used a sleeping bag.  I was comfortable enough.

Also, have you *been* to the UK?

Did you not read the very farkin' initial post of this thread?  I've been there, specifically, probably within no more than a mile or two at one point of where he had his boat berthed.

Having a solar panel in the UK is not much more useful than having snow shoes in the Sahara. And that goes doubly so for Wales, which has a rainier, cloudier climate than the rest of the UK. For half the year in Wales, you will average less than 3.5 hours of sunshine per day, and for a third of the year you'll average around 90 minutes of sunshine per day. (And that's British winter sunshine, which is low and cool.) For the half of the year where he needs the most power to try and keep himself warm, his solar panel will do the square root of bugger all. (And it's funny how you assume he didn't have the LCD panel until he moved the boat, but had the solar panel all along on a boat that was clearly a junker when he was a pauper student.

For all your colorful language, you're actually wrong.   Solar panels do generate power even in the UK during cloudy weather.

As for the solar panel, that's actually fairly standard equipment for a boat like that:  I'd assume it was something one of the previous owners installed on the boat, and it was sold as part of the boat.    The LCD panel isn't, so it's entirely possible it's something he purchased after, but even if not, remember that he wouldn't be on the boat most of the time, except at night after school. and during that time, no energy is necessary.

And then he has to keep the boat floating. It's clearly in rough shape and likely leaks like a sieve, which means a bilge pump running all day. That means running the generator at regular, extended intervals to recharge a car battery from which to run the bilge pump, since the solar panel will be of next to no use for half the year. Let the battery run low and you find home sitting under eight feet of water.

The boat doesn't look like it's in rough shape.  It needs a bit of paint here and there, obviously, and the woodwork could stand some TLC, but he sailed it from Wales to the Isle of Wight with no difficulties, so obviously it's in reasonable shape.  It's showing it's age, but that doesn't mean it's leaking anywhere.  

I find it eminently believable that his shelter/utility expenses were less than he could have maintained closer to campus.

I didn't say they weren't less expensive than a dorm on campus. I said they weren't less expensive than a room in an apartment the same distance away from campus that the boat was.

*Looking at where he docked on Google Earth, I'm guessing he didn't have internet connectivity there.

Yes. Internet can only be had through cables. It's a shame that nobody has invented satellite internet, or phones capable of going online. At least, not in 1993, where you're apparently stuck.


Let's look at the options, shall we?

1. Satellite Internet.   Basic satellite internet in Wales cost 50 pounds a month while he was going to school (a recent grant brought it down to 20 pounds).  I think we can assume he didn't have that based on cost alone.  Plus, you run into dish aiming issues on a boat.  Those aren't as big a deal if you are moored, of course.

2. Internet via cell phone.  He'd have coverage here. Whether it's good enough to do any actual work might be an issue, and you're assuming he had a cell phone, and one capable of accessing the internet.  Even so, it would be battery powered.  My wife's smartphone only takes about 30 minutes to charge up, and he could do that in the library or where ever while he was on campus, and use the phone on the boat.

Also, it is clearly impossible to study without internet connectivity. It's a well-known fact that laptop computers stop working when you're offline. (And not just the Chromebook.) And by 1993, where you're permanently lodged, paper books and other study aids had gone completely out of production.My whole point is that he would have spent the majority of his waking hours on campus on school days, given that it took an hour for him to get there, and an hour for him to get back to the boat.  Say he sleeps 8 hours, and spends 8 hours on campus.  He also spends 2 hours going back and forth to campus on his bicycle.  That means he's only got to have power to light the boat for, what, 6 hours at most?  And some of that would be in the morning and early evening when there is enough daylight that he doesn't need to run anything.Also, they have these neat non-electrical bilge pumps just in case he did get some water in the boat.  Amazing what they will think of, huh?Realistically, I would be willing to put money he lived off shore power (and a not-insignificant amount of the stuff, to heat and float an arthritic sailing sieve in the Welsh climate, and that the Fail has just ignored those costs in its effort to portray all students as layabouts who should've gotten bootstrappy and lived free of charge on the open seas whilst working seventeen jobs to ensure they didn't have a loan, like our hero for this fictitious account.Looking at the boat, it doesn't seem to be in as bad a shape as you make out, the climate in Wales really isn't that bad (I've been there, in fact I camped in Wales and hiked through that area), and with the average January low in that area being above freezing, and in fact a good 18 degrees C *WARMER* than where I grew up, in a room with no heat, I've got to conclude that you think the guy must have heated the boat to 25 deg C or he would have instantly frozen to death in the Siberia-like tundra that is the upper reaches of the Afon Leri.
 
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