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(Washington Post)   The United States puts more children and teenagers in juvenile detention than any other developed nations in the world, with about 130,000 detained in 2010. And as it turns out, this is very likely a bad idea   (washingtonpost.com) divider line 50
    More: Sad, juvenile detention, United States, developing countries  
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6430 clicks; posted to Main » on 16 Jun 2013 at 12:28 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-06-16 12:53:19 AM
7 votes:

fusillade762: snuffy: see what absentee parenting gets us.

Yeah, that's the root of the problem and not a privately run prison system worth $70 billion dollars a year.

[upload.wikimedia.org image 713x499]


The for-profit prisons didn't come into existence until AFTER the SRA. It was the "war on drugs" and the increase in prison inmates, and the concurrent drop in state funding to state prisons and overcrowding, that led to the need for more cheaply run prisons. Which led to the profit motive, which led to the need for more prisoners...it's a cycle, not a straight-line progression.

Then there was the so-called "superpredator" theory of the late 1980's, which caused that big uptick in juvenile incarceration in the late 80's and early 90's. Under that awful theory, advanced by idiot John DiIulio, kids were becoming more amoral, criminally inclined, and violent, and needed to be treated more harshly even than adults lest they become supercriminals later in life and kill the planet. So you had cases where a 16-year old getaway driver in a botched gas station robbery got 31 years without parole because he was adjudged a "superpredator". That took a few years to settle down.

Today, of course, any time anyone suggests lighter sentences, relaxed parole, anything like that, there are people, some of them right here on Fark, who will say things like "Maybe you should let them (sex offenders, murderers, homeless) live in your house while they're being rehabilitated)" as if there was no middle ground between more enlightened penal policies and just letting killers wander the street. It's that mentality that keeps prisons getting fuller and fuller, even as there is less and less room (and less and less reason) for all those inmates.
2013-06-15 09:57:02 PM
7 votes:

snuffy: see what absentee parenting gets us.


Yeah, that's the root of the problem and not a privately run prison system worth $70 billion dollars a year.

upload.wikimedia.org
2013-06-15 10:10:10 PM
4 votes:

Lsherm: fusillade762: snuffy: see what absentee parenting gets us.

Yeah, that's the root of the problem and not a privately run prison system worth $70 billion dollars a year.

[upload.wikimedia.org image 713x499]

Got a graph with an actual incarceration rate?  I'm sure it's gone up, but a graph with the total number of prisoners doesn't mean anything since the population growth has been exponential as well.


Here ya go:

upload.wikimedia.org
United States incarceration rate

More prisoners than any other country in the world, per capita AND total. USA! USA! USA!
2013-06-15 11:54:51 PM
3 votes:
Good idea, bad idea, the real question is: Is it profitable?
2013-06-15 10:43:13 PM
3 votes:
2013-06-15 10:24:30 PM
3 votes:
FTA: "Not only does throwing a kid in detention often reduce the chance that he or she will graduate high school, but it also raises the chance that the youth will commit more crimes later on in life."

Well, our for-profit prison systems need plenty of people to lock up so they can make money, don't they? You wouldn't want some corporate executive to not get his lion's share of your tax money, would you? Think of all the people who wouldn't get a paycheck if we actually rehabilitated people instead of sending them through the revolving-door prison system.
2013-06-16 08:11:15 AM
2 votes:
PER CAPITA MEANS "PER POPULATION"
IF YOU HAVE NOT LEARNED THIS YOU ARE NOT ALLOWED TO SPEAK OR TYPE
2013-06-16 02:23:42 AM
2 votes:

TheWhoppah: SuperNinjaToad: The system itself is not about rehabilitation nor is it about corrections


Why should it be?  Justice is about (1) revenge and (2) keeping innocent people safe.  Who cares about the offenders.  fark them.  They suck.


Justice is about balance of redress, through reason and taking matters to an impartial party, out of the dispute, and then allowing the rule of law, not the rule of revenge and who happens to have the biggest sword or supply of guns handy, because that is sort of what laws were created to avoid, that is massive feuds between clans and families. See, we've tried the "revenge" model already. It has some appeal, but in areas where lines are a bit more gray and subjective prejudice often gets in the way, you kind of want a third party, one who is supposed to be impartial to preside over such things. Which is why, when their is collusion within a court between one side and a judge, things get snippy somewhat quickly.

We have set up a justice system that is supposed to be NOT about revenge. It often has fallen into such a mode, and with the hearty congratulations by a citizenry who is often fickle and bloodthirsty, but we usually look upon such events with some trepidation, because we KNOW the fallout of such things is rarely all that good. The trial of Sacco and Vanzetti as a for instance, or the execution of Joel Emmanuel Hägglund--Joe Hill. There are a LOT of others as well. And oddly enough, a lot of folks said, "If'n they's being put on trial, they musta done somethin'" and that isn't exactly justice. Even AFTER conviction, it has been proven, again and again, that sometimes, those convictions were obtained by some fairly shady means, and that cases can be overturned, when new evidence comes to light, or evidence of collusion and malfeasance on the part of prosecutors or even the judge in question, that is one of the strengths of our justice system. There are certainly holes within it--but mechanisms for appeal are built in to address a few of them, and they are far from perfect, but justice isn't about "fark 'em!" it's about balance and redress and reasoned measures. Otherwise, it devolves into the sort of mob justice that cost a lot of folks with unpopular opinions and associations not just their freedom, but their lives.

Something, something..those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety. What is often eye wrenchingly frustrating, is watching folks who scream about the flag, the Founders, and our traditions of liberty, are often the first to suggest denying such things to those that they don't like, at this moment.

Then again, these are folks who scream about brown people misusing the flag, while they strut in their own flagwear, so perhaps deeper thought processes don't exactly resonate within that crowd. And that is really the issue with justice, is that it ISN'T to appease the crowd, but bring a fair and accurate judgment--and that is what the appeal process is for, to determine IF said decision was accurate and fair, and judgments are overturned, cases are returned, and folks set free often enough, that simply going to court ISN'T exactly synonymous with guilt, and all to often, we have folks who simply assume that being arrested IS proof of guilt. Which sort of subverts the whole justice system in this country, but as I said before, Americans have long distrusted those who think too much...
2013-06-16 02:04:58 AM
2 votes:

mikewadestr: Half the male prison population is black.  I haven't bothered to look at the racial make up of the female prison population.  Most of these black males are raised by single females.  Actually, if you look at the racial make up of the US prison the only real disparity in races are blacks.  So is the entire world a bunch of racist or are black mommas the cause of their son's whoa's.

Stay tuned as mikewadestr will once again serve a suspension for racists comments.


No, black people are mostly poor and tribal. You're looking at it wrong. Don't look at the tribe, look at the people.

Pretend it's "people who listen to rap." Why do rap fans make up the majority of the prison population? It must be the music, right? No, that's ridiculous. Music doesn't make you sell crack. Desperation does, and that stems from poverty.

http://filipspagnoli.wordpress.com/stats-on-human-rights/statistics- on -freedom/statistics-on-prisoner-population-rates/#8

28% of state and federal prisoners were unemployed in the month before their arrest. The national unemployment rate at the time was 5.5%. So the inmate rate was six times the national average.88% of state prisoners and 80% of federal prisoners had a high school education or less. The national average for adults (over 18 years of age) was half that - 48%. Inmates are twice the national average.70% of state and 58% of federal prisoners had an income of less than $2000 in the month prior to arrest. That means they had an annual income of less than $24000.
2013-06-16 01:55:17 AM
2 votes:

Mock26: TheWhoppah: You have to follow the link that says US Incarceration Rates to get to a wiki page where it is compared to other countries ....

That does not list the rate for juveniles.  But, based on a population of roughly 308,000,000 in 2010 and 130,000 youth in juvenile detention that gives a rate of 43 per 100,000.  I still ask, what is the junvenile incarceration rate for other countries?


When talking about juveniles, why does the rate per 100,000 matter exactly? Yes, I understand your argument that more people = more people in prison and that absolute numbers is unfair when comparing, say, Germany to the US. But when talking about kids under 18--and especially when talking about kids under 15--why should you imagine that saying "Yes, but we have so many more people than Germany smaller population so the comparison doesn't count."?

So Germany has a population of 10,000,000 (let's pretend) and they incarcerate 15 juveniles per 100,000, giving them a total of 1500 juveniles incarcerated annually. The US, by your estimate, has a rate of 43 per 100,000 or 130,000 annually, which is probably roughly equivalent. Why would that make ANY difference when the population you're talking about is JUVENILES?

If the rate was half that, or a tenth of that, that would be TOO MANY kids being incarcerated annually, and TOO MANY kids spending some or all of their time being turned into future adult felons. That's why these comparisons with "other industrialized nations" are b/s, imo. Who cares what other countries are doing, or what their "rates" are? Putting children in prison at ANY rate means that a society has failed miserably, and any rate higher than zero should be a source of national shame.
2013-06-16 01:16:52 AM
2 votes:

Mock26: wesmon: Mock26: wesmon: Mock26: Dear Author, the  United States also has a hell of a lot more people than all other developed nations.  With that being said, what are the per capita comparisons to all the other countries?

Troll or idiot?

You are an idiot.  Thank you for asking for clarification.

Now let me ask you a question, do you understand basic math?  Let us say that Country A has 1,000,000 people and they they incarcerate 1,000 people.  Let us say that Country B has 500,000 people and that they incarcerate 750 people.  Who has the higher incarceration rate?  Hmmm?  I will give you a hint, it is not Country A.


Well,

1. The U.S. is not the most populated developed country by a long shot.

2. Someone upthread already posted incarceration rates but you ignored it or didn't understand.

Forgot to mention, the graph posted was the incarceration rate for all Americans.  The farking article was about juveniles in detention.


Well a quick search got me an NPR article with this graph comparing youth incarceration rates of several developed nations.

www.npr.org
2013-06-16 01:01:13 AM
2 votes:
We should have a death penalty for repeat felons over age 40.  If you haven't settled down and stopped that shiat by age 40 then there is no hope for you and we are better off hanging you and harvesting your organs while the are still young enough to be donated.
2013-06-16 12:51:32 AM
2 votes:

PacManDreaming: FTA: "Not only does throwing a kid in detention often reduce the chance that he or she will graduate high school, but it also raises the chance that the youth will commit more crimes later on in life."

Well, our for-profit prison systems need plenty of people to lock up so they can make money, don't they? You wouldn't want some corporate executive to not get his lion's share of your tax money, would you? Think of all the people who wouldn't get a paycheck if we actually rehabilitated people instead of sending them through the revolving-door prison system.


It's not just the for-profit systems.

In California, it's a giant make-work program for unionized public servants.

/everybody is on the take
2013-06-16 12:40:22 AM
2 votes:
Remove the profit motive for incarcerating people, and the rate of incarceration will go down.

Repeal ridiculous criminal and sentencing laws related to possession of marijuana, and the rate of incarceration will go down.
2013-06-16 12:37:51 AM
2 votes:
Hey, we need this for our economy. Gotta maintain that natural rate of unemployment to keep wages down and profits up.

Why do you people hate capitalism?
2013-06-16 12:31:31 AM
2 votes:
Incarceration is big bucks.  Judges get paid to put kids away.
2013-06-16 12:30:07 AM
2 votes:
Mix our high incarceration rates with our cultural favoring of punishment over rehabilitation and you basically have a giant whirlpool pulling people back into the system till they drop dead.
2013-06-15 10:22:04 PM
2 votes:
I wonder if this is a result of running what should be government's job as a private for-profit.
2013-06-16 07:32:51 PM
1 votes:

Agent Smiths Laugh: You did wrong, now we the people (instead of we the lynch-mob or I the vigilante) are going to get you for it (and if we're thinking about it, protecting everyone else from you).

If someone hurt your daughter, can you truly say that you would be looking for anything more than payback by way of we the people?


This is one of the reasons that we employ a system of laws, to get folks who want revenge out of the business of serving up justice. As a father, someone who hurts my daughter had best hope that the police get there first. I won't be serving up justice, I will be serving up heapings of revenge. Which is why we have laws to prevent lynch mobs rolling out, because oddly enough, I might get the identity wrong. I might also not realize exactly the circumstances either. I will be blinded by rage, and justice isn't about rage. And if that poor SOB had family, they would then be looking for their own payback, and a whole circle of feuds then rolls out, vendetta after vendetta. Punishment is a factor, but that has to suit the crime, and the aggrieved party or their family isn't necessarily in the best position to decide that. We have that remove with a system of laws, and appointed police and judges and a whole passel of folks to intercede to avoid a cascade of revenge, because we've seen how that works out already.

Revenge is a powerful motivator, and society strives to punish those who have harmed folks, but at that remove to keep folks from that cascade of revenge that only leads to further violence. Mind you, our own system has its flaws. We are a nation that prides itself on being tough on crime, and our system right now breeds a LOT of crime through our economic and domestic policies, our less than stellar educational system that sees folks failing as a feature, not a bug. We are in fact banking on folks failing miserably, and some folks are seeing a tidy profit on keeping things rolling that way.

We can do better. We should be doing better, and that is really the way that folks should be voting, not to see this cycle continue.

We want less crime? Then we need a better social safety net. We need better education--not just better funded, but shifting our goals towards skills based education, as opposed to test standards which only gauge how well folks take tests. We are gearing ourselves towards a perpetuation of the troubles we see today. We need to focus on our local economies, we might want to rethink this idiotic War on Drugs that only serves to feed the prison industry--as well as pad out police budgets and likewise profit those who take a nice cut with seizures.

We don't, because folks like to play the "tough on crime" card, which only perpetuates the cycle, and only serves to create more felons, who have distinctly less opportunities after they have supposedly paid their debt to society. We are creating our own monsters to then react against, and then dare to be shocked when those monsters behave exactly thusly. Our justice system still needs some work, but it's still miles better than lynching folks we think did something...
2013-06-16 03:06:25 PM
1 votes:

RicosRoughnecks: PsiChick: The bolded sentence is exactly what I mean by 'underdeveloped prefrontal cortex'. That's not actually something your brain should be capable of thinking under normal conditions.

While I can definitely agree with you there, I also need to mention I never once broke anything. Like I said before, I would do something that looked dangerous and impressive, but usually without actually putting myself in any real danger. The self preservation instinct was definitely the strongest one I ever felt. It's those darn selfish genes trying to propagate themselves through any means necessary.


Ah. Yeah, in that case (without knowing anything about your brain scans), I would guess that you, like me, actually  had a developed prefrontal cortex. If you'd acted on the urge and broken bones, you'd be a candidate for typical puberty, i.e. with a badly-developed prefrontal cortex.

/Like I said, I'm going off what you say, not brain scans, but with that context it now sounds like it
//The kids without it are littering Youtube.
2013-06-16 02:28:43 PM
1 votes:

RicosRoughnecks: PsiChick: ...Except that, during puberty, the prefrontal cortex is one of the last areas of the brain to develop, meaning teenagers are aware that stupid shiat looks cool--i.e. jumping off that roof on a bike--but are biologically incapable of realizing it is a bad idea thanks to magical thinking--i.e. they don't realize they risk broken bones.

Or, to put it another way, when they think it's fun to shoplift, they literally cannot understand what the consequences might be on a fundamental level. Beat them as much as you want--you can't change biology.

There's no way I can agree with you on this just because I have a pretty good memory of when I was a teenage boy. Hormones made me do stupid things, but I KNEW they were stupid and understood the risks/consequences. I just knew I wanted to impress girls I had a crush on even more than I wanted to keep my leg from breaking. And of course we boys liked to make the risks we took look more impressive than they were to gain the benefits without as much negative consequences.


The bolded sentence is exactly what I mean by 'underdeveloped prefrontal cortex'. That's not actually something your brain should be capable of thinking under normal conditions.
2013-06-16 01:16:39 PM
1 votes:

TWX: minoridiot: Has anyone considered beating their butts?   I know it's a crazy idea, but it might be an alternative to detention.

"butbut Think of teh children!!!!!1!!!one!!"

In all seriousness, I agree with your sentiment. Kids need to learn that there are consequences for their actions before those consequences become enforced by the police and the courts.


...Except that, during puberty, the prefrontal cortex is one of the last areas of the brain to develop, meaning teenagers are aware that stupid shiat  looks cool--i.e. jumping off that roof on a bike--but  are biologically incapable of realizing it is a bad idea thanks to magical thinking--i.e. they don't realize they risk broken bones.

Or, to put it another way, when they think it's fun to shoplift, they  literally cannot understand what the consequences might be on a fundamental level. Beat them as much as you want--you can't change biology.

/And, as history has shown, it has never worked, no matter what discipline techniques a society uses. Teen boys are always the most hormone-filled idiots of the society, whether hunter-gatherers or princes of empires.
2013-06-16 12:50:10 PM
1 votes:
I noticed that the study referenced in the article said they could determine which judges were strict and which were lenient.  I wonder if they could also determine which judges were getting kick backs, because I bet that's an even bigger factor.
2013-06-16 12:36:34 PM
1 votes:
People_are_Idiots:
Not the whole thing. Our problem? We make jail comfy.

well, at least your handle is appropriate for one person here

/do you really believe that jails in the US are more comfortable than jails in the rest of the developed world?
2013-06-16 12:31:16 PM
1 votes:

snuffy: see what absentee parenting gets us.


psh, the US puts more people in jail period than any other developed nation.

/that's what a pathological need to punish those we perceive as guilty gets us.
2013-06-16 09:33:12 AM
1 votes:

Turbo Cojones: Gee ya think the violent crime rate in the US might have something to do with the incarceration rate in the US?

I get a kick out of the posters who scream "but, but, PRIVATE PRISONS are to blame" as if the offenders willfully committing crimes had nothing to do with it.

You know, they are just walking along minding their own biz and get dropped in Super Max for no reason whatsoever!  How Unfair!


Whatever dude, there's a reason it's called con college.

Csb: The one and only night I've ever spent in jail (had a baggy with a stem and a couple of seeds and couldn't stop back talking the cop), I was the 14th person in an 8 man holding cell. Four people offered me "a job", said I could make a lot of money. One needed a new partner to help boost cars, two told me they could hook me up with a sweet gig cooking meth, and one said the same about slinging pot. If I wasn't gainfully employed with a supportive network of friends and family, I could very easily see how I would be tempted by these offers. I can also see how alluring that proposition would be for a young kid with no job and a family that didn't give a shiat. But I said no, because I knew when the morning came I'd be out and going back to work and that I wouldn't have to break the law again jut to make ends meet. Just to farking feed and clothe myself. If that's how jail was, I can't imagine the networking opportunities available in the farking prison system.

In short, go fark yourself.

/There's more ignorance on the main page than the politics tab
//And that's really saying a lot
2013-06-16 05:16:06 AM
1 votes:

Mock26: Foxxinnia: The whole concept of punishment-based incarceration doesn't make any sense. Like, hey you're wicked farked up and did farked up stuff so we're going to put you in the most farked up environment we have for a long time. Then we'll release you into society again even more farked up than you were when you went in with the expectation you won't do more farked up shiat. Great system. That's totes safer than addressing the circumstances that actually cause people to commit crime. Just take people with no jobs and bad histories and give them criminal connections and psychological scarring and then release them onto us again. Thanks guys.

OK, Einstein, what is the solution?  What do we do with a murderer, for example, if he is caught and convicted?  Wag our finger at him call him a naughty boy?  Let him go and ask that he never do it again?  Hmmm?


Well it's hardly an Einstein-level conundrum. Rehabilitative practices for criminals have been in development for decades and are being used around the world and increasingly in the United States. Not every single practice works obviously, but it's not too difficult to weed out best practices to develop methods that reduce recidivism and decrease costs in comparison to the current system.
2013-06-16 04:23:29 AM
1 votes:

TheWhoppah: WhyteRaven74: TheWhoppah: Justice is, first and foremost, about revenge

Revenge fixes nothing. Revenge is based on the idea a present action can undo a past action. Which it clearly can not. Or that having committed some wrong a person is deserving of an equal or worse wrong. Justice does not work that way.


Thanks for your input Ghandi.  Now run along back to Utopia and smoke a bong with Jesus.  Like it or not, the human sense of justice is based squarely on revenge.  You can see it in a group of toddlers... as soon as they can walk they begin dishing out their own revenge-based justice.


Truly, we should model more of our society on the behavior of toddlers.  The first thing is we should settle all arguments by falling onto the floor wailing and crying.  It'll be an easy transition for the politics tab.
2013-06-16 02:15:06 AM
1 votes:

wesmon: Mock26: wesmon: Mock26: wesmon: Mock26: Dear Author, the  United States also has a hell of a lot more people than all other developed nations.  With that being said, what are the per capita comparisons to all the other countries?

Troll or idiot?

You are an idiot.  Thank you for asking for clarification.

Now let me ask you a question, do you understand basic math?  Let us say that Country A has 1,000,000 people and they they incarcerate 1,000 people.  Let us say that Country B has 500,000 people and that they incarcerate 750 people.  Who has the higher incarceration rate?  Hmmm?  I will give you a hint, it is not Country A.


Well,

1. The U.S. is not the most populated developed country by a long shot.

2. Someone upthread already posted incarceration rates but you ignored it or didn't understand.

Forgot to mention, the graph posted was the incarceration rate for all Americans.  The farking article was about juveniles in detention.

Well a quick search got me an NPR article with this graph comparing youth incarceration rates of several developed nations.

[www.npr.org image 624x337]


Wikipedia has a nifty map.

upload.wikimedia.org
Suck it, China!
2013-06-16 02:10:04 AM
1 votes:

TheWhoppah: moothemagiccow: 28% of state and federal prisoners were unemployed in the month before their arrest. The national unemployment rate at the time was 5.5%. So the inmate rate was six times the national average.88% of state prisoners and 80% of federal prisoners had a high school education or less. The national average for adults (over 18 years of age) was half that - 48%. Inmates are twice the national average.70% of state and 58% of federal prisoners had an income of less than $2000 in the month prior to arrest. That means they had an annual income of less than $24000.


In other words, people who make poor decisions may end up in prison.  Wow.  What a shock!


Not if they can afford a good lawyer
2013-06-16 02:04:14 AM
1 votes:
Given that we have quite a few bullshiat laws that only apply to people under 18 that other countries don't, this is no surprise.  Add into that the kangaroo court that is the juvenile court and no one should be surprised a lot of people under 18 are incarcerated.
2013-06-16 02:01:22 AM
1 votes:

mikewadestr: Half the male prison population is black.  I haven't bothered to look at the racial make up of the female prison population.  Most of these black males are raised by single females.  Actually, if you look at the racial make up of the US prison the only real disparity in races are blacks.  So is the entire world a bunch of racist or are black mommas the cause of their son's whoa's.

Stay tuned as mikewadestr will once again serve a suspension for racists comments.


It's a hell of a lot easier to avoid jail time for smoking weed in the suburbs than it is in the ghettos.
2013-06-16 01:57:53 AM
1 votes:
Since many detention centers & prisons are contracted out and are for-profit, it might be that many crooked judges get a little cut of the action the more kids they send away.
2013-06-16 01:40:14 AM
1 votes:
Is there any way that we can make prisons unprofitable?  That might fix the problem.
2013-06-16 01:26:40 AM
1 votes:

TheWhoppah: One or two percent of humans are good-for-nothing sociopaths.
The sooner we identify them and lock them up the better for everyone.
If other nations can't afford to lock up their scumbags that is their problem, not ours.

Mock26: wesmon: Mock26: wesmon: Mock26: Dear Author, the  United States also has a hell of a lot more people than all other developed nations.  With that being said, what are the per capita comparisons to all the other countries?

Troll or idiot?

You are an idiot.  Thank you for asking for clarification.

Now let me ask you a question, do you understand basic math?  Let us say that Country A has 1,000,000 people and they they incarcerate 1,000 people.  Let us say that Country B has 500,000 people and that they incarcerate 750 people.  Who has the higher incarceration rate?  Hmmm?  I will give you a hint, it is not Country A.


Well,

1. The U.S. is not the most populated developed country by a long shot.

2. Someone upthread already posted incarceration rates but you ignored it or didn't understand.

1.  Hmmm, meant to say "most developed nations."
2.  All I saw was someone's graph showing just that of the United States.  Who was it that posted the per 100,000 rates for other countries?


I think you missed the entire point.. even within the US the incarceration rates among juvies have gone up exponentially in the past 2 or 3 decades.
Now either kids in the US have gotten really violent all of a sudden or cops suddenly become more proactive in throwing people into prison compared to their peers before them. Since neither is probably true there is a 3rd possibility and that is our entire criminal/judicial system that is responsible for this exponential hike.
The system itself is not about rehabilitation nor is it about corrections. It is all about making money even if it means beings counterproductive to the very reasons behind putting someone behind bars in the first place.
2013-06-16 01:16:57 AM
1 votes:
www.wired.com
2013-06-16 01:12:10 AM
1 votes:
Of the "Developed Nations", the U.S. is the most populous at ~316,000,000 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_World_Factbook_list_of_developed_co un tries )

Its population is more than the next three developed nations combined (Japan, Germany and France) ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_population )

It is completely unsurprising that the US would have "more children and teenagers in juvenile detention than any other developed nations."

Nice troll article subby.

"Figures don't lie, but liars can figure." - Mark Twain
2013-06-16 12:57:23 AM
1 votes:
Who cares how long people have been aware of it?

 The idea is that when there is an opportunity to wake more people up to this stuff and push for changes it can only be a good thing.

Instead of patting yourself on the back for being ahead of the curve, try to get more people enlightened and outraged.
2013-06-16 12:51:13 AM
1 votes:
i562.photobucket.com
2013-06-16 12:47:00 AM
1 votes:
One or two percent of humans are good-for-nothing sociopaths.
The sooner we identify them and lock them up the better for everyone.
If other nations can't afford to lock up their scumbags that is their problem, not ours.
TWX
2013-06-16 12:40:25 AM
1 votes:

minoridiot: Has anyone considered beating their butts?   I know it's a crazy idea, but it might be an alternative to detention.


"butbut Think of teh children!!!!!1!!!one!!"

In all seriousness, I agree with your sentiment. Kids need to learn that there are consequences for their actions before those consequences become enforced by the police and the courts.
2013-06-16 12:39:47 AM
1 votes:
Let's fix it. There's a piece of legislation before Congress that should be a bipartisan measure that's going to come up for a push soon. The Youth PROMISE Act, which would invest in programs, chosen by local communities, that are proven to reduce youth violence, with the funding structured to encourage communities to take the savings from their corrections and police budgets and reinvest them in those same successful programs. Call your Representatives and ask them to support it. It saves money, is controlled at the community level, and reduces crime. Everybody wins.
2013-06-16 12:38:55 AM
1 votes:
Define "bad idea". It creates a permanent underclass that cannot vote, and which is forced to do the bidding of the ruling class.

Sounds like a good idea to me!
2013-06-16 12:34:25 AM
1 votes:
i291.photobucket.com
2013-06-15 11:54:43 PM
1 votes:

Weaver95: lets just throw everyone into one giant open air, unregulated prison.  how about Death Valley?  we can isolate it easy enough.  put in some basic infrastructure, like wells or whatever.  wall it off, then take all our undesirables and throw 'em into the prison.  once you go in, you don't get out.  inside - anything goes.  no rules, save you stay inside 'till you die.  we can throw in men, women, kids, political prisoners, damn near anyone we want.  just air drop supplies in on a random pattern at regular intervals.


The good news is, once we do that, we can just find some one eyed, long haired miscreant to haul folks out when things go FUBAR. THIS is a perfect plan!
2013-06-15 11:28:41 PM
1 votes:
2013-06-15 10:41:24 PM
1 votes:
One might almost think that there was some incentive to incarcerate folks...
2013-06-15 10:38:40 PM
1 votes:
Has anyone considered beating their butts?   I know it's a crazy idea, but it might be an alternative to detention.
2013-06-15 10:02:20 PM
1 votes:

fusillade762: snuffy: see what absentee parenting gets us.

Yeah, that's the root of the problem and not a privately run prison system worth $70 billion dollars a year.

[upload.wikimedia.org image 713x499]


Got a graph with an actual incarceration rate?  I'm sure it's gone up, but a graph with the total number of prisoners doesn't mean anything since the population growth has been exponential as well.
2013-06-15 07:25:15 PM
1 votes:
see what absentee parenting gets us.
 
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