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(Yahoo)   It seemed like it took light years, but astronomers have created a 3D map of the known universe   (news.yahoo.com) divider line 44
    More: Cool, light-years, universe, Astronomers create  
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3751 clicks; posted to Geek » on 15 Jun 2013 at 5:29 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-06-15 12:13:29 PM
Parsecs subby, it took parsecs.
 
2013-06-15 12:39:11 PM
www.americanhumanist.org

"I would not say that. No-one would say that, a light year is a unit of distance, not time."
 
2013-06-15 02:36:53 PM
That was excellent and just under the time it took the Millennium Falcon to do the Kessel run.  But yes, excellent.
 
2013-06-15 02:51:43 PM
I don't know how anyone can look at the sheer scale of the KNOWN universe and still believe we are the only intelligent life in it.
 
2013-06-15 05:18:45 PM
damn, I misplaced my red and blue glasses
 
2013-06-15 05:35:01 PM
I'll look later.  Kim Kardashian just had her baby!
 
2013-06-15 05:50:26 PM
Again?
 
2013-06-15 05:51:06 PM

Bucky Katt: damn, I misplaced my red and blue glasses


th03.deviantart.net
 
2013-06-15 05:55:44 PM

Ambivalence: I don't know how anyone can look at the sheer scale of the KNOWN universe and still believe we are the only intelligent life in it.


Let's keep it realistic, shall we?
 
2013-06-15 06:02:39 PM
What happens if I send that file to Thingiverse?
 
2013-06-15 06:05:38 PM
Subby deserves to be torn apart one atom at a time by a black hole for linking to a video about the video that we actually want to see.
 
2013-06-15 06:13:35 PM

Ambivalence: I don't know how anyone can look at the sheer scale of the KNOWN universe and still believe we are the only intelligent life in it.


If God would have created other people it'd be mentioned in the bible.
 
2013-06-15 06:15:05 PM

Ambivalence: I don't know how anyone can look at the sheer scale of the KNOWN universe and still believe we are the only intelligent life in it.


Please, like dinosaur bones, stars are there just to test the faith of the true believers.

/or something like that
 
2013-06-15 06:40:09 PM

Quaker: Subby deserves to be torn apart one atom at a time by a black hole for linking to a video about the video that we actually want to see.


And for it being a repeat of a thread a week ago, anyway.
 
2013-06-15 06:43:29 PM

Ambivalence: I don't know how anyone can look at the sheer scale of the KNOWN universe and still believe we are the only intelligent life in it.


The only people I know who think that are old fuddy-duddy creationists who couldn't provide a credible literary analysis of "Green Eggs and Ham," much less the Bible.

Now, more practical questions would be "Are there any in our galaxy?" or "Are they existing at the same time as us?" and other annoying little obsticles to whether you'll actually ever get to see those intelligent life-forms...
 
2013-06-15 07:05:30 PM

Ambivalence: I don't know how anyone can look at the sheer scale of the KNOWN universe and still believe we are the only intelligent life in it.


I don't know how anyone can look at the sheer scale of the known universe and still believe it's possible to have any kind of meaningful conversation between intelligent life in it.

For example, the "Wow!" signal - if it did originate from intelligent extraterrestrial life - would have been sent in 1852 (IIRC; give or take a few years). And it would have had to have been sent as a guess or as a probe since we obviously weren't broadcasting in the 1850's. We received it 125 years later and are just getting around to replying this year. It'll be 2138 by the time they get their reply. Assuming further that the great, great grandchildren are still listening and reply immediately instead of saying, "What the hell?! Should we reply?" we won't have confirmation until at least 2263.

All this for a conversation that amounts to: "Hey?" "Hey?" "Hey."

I'm not saying it's a worthless pursuit. Far from it. I am saying not to get your hopes up and that our priority should be on getting our shiat together at home rather than hoping for some kind of Intergalactic Savior species.
 
2013-06-15 07:11:06 PM
The beginning reminded me of this
 
2013-06-15 07:26:32 PM
Well technically a light-year is both a distance and a time. Time being a year and a distance being how far light travels in a year. So you could in some ways talk about the time component of light years, but using them together just makes you look stupid. It's like if I used Newtons in context to just acceleration, it would make me look stupid.
 
2013-06-15 07:53:15 PM

encyclopediaplushuman: Well technically a light-year is both a distance and a time. Time being a year and a distance being how far light travels in a year. So you could in some ways talk about the time component of light years, but using them together just makes you look stupid. It's like if I used Newtons in context to just acceleration, it would make me look stupid.


Hey, look everybody!  We know the Fark handle of the Time Cube guy!!!
 
2013-06-15 08:44:34 PM
Why has no one posted [thatsthejoke.jpg] yet?
 
2013-06-15 09:22:00 PM
I can see my house!
 
2013-06-15 09:37:00 PM
 
2013-06-15 10:05:32 PM
I totally dig this video
 
TKM
2013-06-15 10:47:42 PM
Incomplete without the Ringworld.
 
2013-06-15 11:04:05 PM
3.bp.blogspot.com
Unimpressed.
 
2013-06-15 11:30:09 PM
I don't get why people say aliens couldn't have visited us because of how get away they'd be. Sure the trip would be impossibly long for us, but who's to say these hypothetical aliens don't have drastically longer lifespans? Not that I think they have visited, I just don't see travel time as something to make it impossible.
 
2013-06-15 11:34:25 PM
The key word is "known"

There are still many more layers to this onion.

/brings tears to my eyes.
 
2013-06-15 11:55:49 PM

picturescrazy: I don't get why people say aliens couldn't have visited us because of how get away they'd be. Sure the trip would be impossibly long for us, but who's to say these hypothetical aliens don't have drastically longer lifespans? Not that I think they have visited, I just don't see travel time as something to make it impossible.


I'm not sure it's whether or not aliens could visit us, but do they want to.
If the signals we are sending out are reaching other races, do you think that they would even want to waste their time with us? I mean, have you looked outside? We're a bunch of arrogant, ignorant, self-absorbed, violent and hateful meat bags. If I was a member of a more intelligent race I would avoid this place like the plague.
And shiat isn't going to get better until we start acting like humans instead of a pack of animals.
 
2013-06-16 12:10:25 AM

TKM: Incomplete without the Ringworld.


or the explosion coming from the center of the galaxy
or a cluster or 5 planets in a Klemperer rosette running away from said explosion

//shakes not so tiny fist about the ringworld comment
 
2013-06-16 12:55:53 AM

Unoriginal_Username: If the signals we are sending out are reaching other races, do you think that they would even want to waste their time with us?


Our first radio signals have only made it 110 light-years from Earth so far. Television signals have only traveled about 74 light-years... about 50 light-years from here, episodes of the twilight zone would be showing.

Really that isn't very far. This thing is showing 120 million light-years. The overwhelming majority of star systems wouldn't even know we existed. About 14,600 (roughly) star systems are within 100 light-years of Earth. There are no other galaxies within 120 light-years. The closest is the Canis Major dwarf galaxy, which is being absorbed by the Milky Way galaxy. Canis Major is about 25,000 light-years from us (we're about 27,000 light-years from the Milky Way's galactic center). Andromeda is about 2 million light-years away. The Milky Way has about 200 to 400 billion stars in it... so... barely any stars in our own galaxy has had a chance to hear us yet (even assuming that they can).

Point is that we're small... even our transmissions are small. Assuming there is intelligent life out there capable of listening, it probably hasn't heard a peep from us yet. Even if we figure it on the low end saying 200 billion stars in the Milky Way... that means only 0.000000073%  of star systems in our own galaxy have even had a chance of hearing us. At 400 billion it's 0.0000000365% of star systems in the Milky Way.
 
2013-06-16 01:06:56 AM

MusicMakeMyHeadPound: Ambivalence: I don't know how anyone can look at the sheer scale of the KNOWN universe and still believe we are the only intelligent life in it.

I don't know how anyone can look at the sheer scale of the known universe and still believe it's possible to have any kind of meaningful conversation between intelligent life in it.

For example, the "Wow!" signal - if it did originate from intelligent extraterrestrial life - would have been sent in 1852 (IIRC; give or take a few years). And it would have had to have been sent as a guess or as a probe since we obviously weren't broadcasting in the 1850's. We received it 125 years later and are just getting around to replying this year. It'll be 2138 by the time they get their reply. Assuming further that the great, great grandchildren are still listening and reply immediately instead of saying, "What the hell?! Should we reply?" we won't have confirmation until at least 2263.

All this for a conversation that amounts to: "Hey?" "Hey?" "Hey."

I'm not saying it's a worthless pursuit. Far from it. I am saying not to get your hopes up and that our priority should be on getting our shiat together at home rather than hoping for some kind of Intergalactic Savior species.


I'll buy the fact that a conversation may be pointless for those of us alive today--due to our short lifespans--but the Universe is 13.7 billion years old and the short time span that you're mentioning is insignificant compared to the age of the cosmos. The benefit to future Humanity could be huge so in the end it may be worth it.

If our species lives another 100k years, and each part of the conversation took 500 years per side, we could still communicate with each other 200 times. Or 100 times per one way message. Once a link is established, a lot of information could be sent in that length of time. Having a conversation would just take some effort and wouldn't necessarily be useless to attempt due to that fact.

I think Unoriginal_Usename has it right though. Why would any civilization want to communicate with us? I think we would be insignificant to most civs out there. Unless they're more like us in terms of their civilization's advancement that is. Or maybe they're just inquisitive like us. Knowing there was something else out there may be worth the it because knowing we're not alone would be a staggering thought. My only regret is that I probably won't be around to know it.
 
rpl
2013-06-16 01:22:45 AM

Ambivalence: I don't know how anyone can look at the sheer scale of the KNOWN universe and still believe we are the only intelligent life in it.


I know, right? CLEARLY this universe was intelligently designed by my deity of choice! I mean, just look at the sheer scale and complexity of it!

/amidoinitrite?
 
2013-06-16 02:32:22 AM
I'd like to print that map out on a 3D-printer.
 
2013-06-16 02:36:32 AM
Whar Kzin?  Whar Flatland?  Whar Ringworld, whar?

www.fanfic.us
 
2013-06-16 02:53:07 AM
It took me miles to read this article.
 
2013-06-16 03:20:03 AM
What if the aliens are dumber than us? No one ever asks that. And what if our universe is just an atom in a larger universe? Whoa.
 
2013-06-16 03:26:18 AM

FrancoFile: Hey, look everybody! We know the Fark handle of the Time Cube guy!!!


This made me laugh so loud my girlfriend wanted to know what was up, and I had to show her timecube.com.
 
2013-06-16 05:01:02 AM
pfft.  I once made a Plaster of Paris cast of my penis.
 
2013-06-16 08:33:19 AM

JohnnyC: Unoriginal_Username: If the signals we are sending out are reaching other races, do you think that they would even want to waste their time with us?

Our first radio signals have only made it 110 light-years from Earth so far. Television signals have only traveled about 74 light-years... about 50 light-years from here, episodes of the twilight zone would be showing.

Really that isn't very far. This thing is showing 120 million light-years. The overwhelming majority of star systems wouldn't even know we existed. About 14,600 (roughly) star systems are within 100 light-years of Earth. There are no other galaxies within 120 light-years. The closest is the Canis Major dwarf galaxy, which is being absorbed by the Milky Way galaxy. Canis Major is about 25,000 light-years from us (we're about 27,000 light-years from the Milky Way's galactic center). Andromeda is about 2 million light-years away. The Milky Way has about 200 to 400 billion stars in it... so... barely any stars in our own galaxy has had a chance to hear us yet (even assuming that they can).

Point is that we're small... even our transmissions are small. Assuming there is intelligent life out there capable of listening, it probably hasn't heard a peep from us yet. Even if we figure it on the low end saying 200 billion stars in the Milky Way... that means only 0.000000073%  of star systems in our own galaxy have even had a chance of hearing us. At 400 billion it's 0.0000000365% of star systems in the Milky Way.


True enough, but one could argue, that if a civilization out there is advanced enough to be able to travel huge distances in short periods of time that they may have swung into our little neck of the woods, heard some of those broadcasts and though 'well that was a waste of dark matter' Of course, we can speculate all we want, we won't know the answer for a long time.
 
2013-06-16 09:02:41 AM

Ambivalence: I don't know how anyone can look at the sheer scale of the KNOWN universe and still believe we are the only intelligent life in it.


Easy. Somebody has to be first, and a LOT of the circumstances that had to fall into place for us to arise may well have not all arisen anywhere else, yet.

Also, I read about new interpretations of the background radio environment that means none of our radio/TV signals have gotten much farther than Alpha Centauri before fizzling out to static hash.

Based on the youth of the universe, I posit that it's decently-likely we're the first intelligences in the universe, and nobody will ever notice we were hear by the time this universe dissolves away.
 
2013-06-16 02:04:35 PM
"Hey baby, they call me the great attractor."
 
2013-06-16 05:52:04 PM
Congratulations, you've successfully created a map of the galaxies a long time ago, because the map doesn't look like this anymore.  So a map that was created purely for shiats and giggles, is not even usable if I could travel this map today.

If you want to impress me, spend the money on helping the poor and unfortunate.
 
2013-06-16 10:33:22 PM
Here's a point I got from a Stephen Baxter book- there are signs of intelligent life that we could detect in other galaxies. Unusual rates of supernovas, for example. Of course, the time it would take the light to get here means we would only see it long after the fact, but we would be able to know that it happened.
 
2013-06-16 11:12:35 PM
The accent was thicker than Brie and so distractingly hard to understand that it sucked all the joy out of that video like a Frenchman sucking on a Gaulois.  Had to stop after three minutes from sheer annoyance.
 
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