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(Christian Post)   Anti-gay Congressman accidentally attends pro-gay event. At least that's how he tells it   (christianpost.com) divider line 78
    More: Amusing, Ralph Hall, congressman  
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3901 clicks; posted to Politics » on 14 Jun 2013 at 11:48 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-06-14 09:25:18 PM
He's NINETY.  They didn't have gays back in his time.  They were just "fops" or "dandies"
 
2013-06-14 09:27:21 PM

BravadoGT: He's NINETY.


And we still let him serve in Congress. Pathetic.
 
2013-06-14 09:41:01 PM

kronicfeld: BravadoGT: He's NINETY.

And we still let him serve in Congress. Pathetic.


I told him you said that and he's coming for you.
 Could you please stay still for the next week and a half.
 
2013-06-14 09:43:36 PM
 he had entered the wrong door.
I'm going to have to write that one down.
 
2013-06-14 09:50:04 PM

kronicfeld: BravadoGT: He's NINETY.

And we still let him serve in Congress. Pathetic.


Seriously

/if we can't have term limits, can we at least have a freaking mandatory retirement age?
 
2013-06-14 10:10:36 PM
When you're with the Flintstones
you'll have a yabba dabba doo time.
A dabba doo time.
You'll have a gay old time.
 
2013-06-14 10:17:16 PM
"And before I went into that wrong door I inadvertently dressed myself in a darkened room, which is why I am wearing chaps, pink pixie wings, body glitter and have the words 'SPERM DUMP' blearily lipsticked on my cheeks. Nothing to see here!"
 
2013-06-14 10:22:01 PM

I_Am_Weasel: he had entered the wrong door.
I'm going to have to write that one down.


Isn't that the excuse for anal?
 
2013-06-14 10:22:58 PM
the longtime conservative quickly left the premises - that is, as quickly as a 90-year-old can physically leave a premises

He probably ran straight to his doctor for a checkup to make sure he hadn't caught the gay.
 
2013-06-14 10:44:39 PM
... not just a river in Egypt
 
2013-06-14 11:06:02 PM
Did he hide behind some bushes with a staffer and/or bodyguard nearby?
 
2013-06-14 11:52:54 PM
He was obviously lost.

In, oh, so many ways. . . .
 
2013-06-14 11:53:29 PM
So he went in the back door and came too soon?
 
2013-06-15 12:06:48 AM

I_Am_Weasel: he had entered the wrong door.
I'm going to have to write that one down.



upload.wikimedia.org

R.I.P. IN THROUGH THE OUT DOOR
 
2013-06-15 12:15:19 AM
Sure. He wants them to think he's just old, and not really looking to get gang banged by a line of young black men.
 
2013-06-15 12:18:47 AM
The issue isn't the wrong door, it's not checking the front before you slip in the back.
 
2013-06-15 12:36:42 AM
I just finished watching Bill Maher, and he had a segment about our "Weekend at Bernie's government" with such old members serving. While just being ambulatory at his age is an impressive accomplishment, being easily confused (with a few rare exceptions) comes with the territory at his age.
 
2013-06-15 12:40:31 AM
"Many of those in attendance probably were surprised to see me walk in, but were not surprised to see me leave quickly," Hall said about his mistake.

i.imgur.com
 
2013-06-15 12:42:40 AM
Many of the shocked attendees at the LGBT event seemed uncertain as to whether Hall had intentionally come to support their cause or if he was just lost.

The shock of the attendees regarding Hall's presence was evidenced on Twitter, as many wondered whether or not he was there on purpose or if he actually was just lost.


Okay, there's still one more way you could write that.
 
2013-06-15 12:43:38 AM
cute beard.
 
2013-06-15 12:45:17 AM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: kronicfeld: BravadoGT: He's NINETY.

And we still let him serve in Congress. Pathetic.

Seriously

/if we can't have term limits, can we at least have a freaking mandatory retirement age?


Hey, being 90-years old doesn't disqualify him. It's not like being a Republican in the House of Representatives is particularly demanding, although I imagine it's a lot like Groundhog Day for him with all those attempts to repeal Obamacare.
 
2013-06-15 12:59:00 AM
t2.gstatic.com

Accidental hug
 
2013-06-15 01:01:12 AM
Why was everyone at the LBGT event "shocked" at his presence? An old man shows up, acts polite for a little bit, then leaves: What's the "shock"? Why not invite him to stay a while? He's almost as old as my grandmother, for chrissakes, at least I can understand why HE would be a DOMA advocate.

And in re the horrors over his age--you would not be annoyed if my aged grandmother were serving the state of Florida as one of their Representatives, even if she is a die-hard Republican. The problem would be (like this old man) getting her in and out of the building in a timely fashion. Age =/= retardation, any more than youth = sharp mind and brilliant insight into social issues. Remind me to tell you about her minor contribution to the integration of West Virginia education some time.
 
2013-06-15 01:16:05 AM
Too late! He done caught the gay.
 
182
2013-06-15 01:20:18 AM
he was just looking for a lemon party.
 
2013-06-15 01:22:13 AM

Gyrfalcon: And in re the horrors over his age--you would not be annoyed if my aged grandmother were serving the state of Florida as one of their Representatives, even if she is a die-hard Republican. The problem would be (like this old man) getting her in and out of the building in a timely fashion. Age =/= retardation, any more than youth = sharp mind and brilliant insight into social issues. Remind me to tell you about her minor contribution to the integration of West Virginia education some time.


For me, the problem with all the old people serving in Congress is that most of them don't have a farking clue about the struggles of today's youth. Or the current cultural issues that's going on today. They are out of touch with modern society and yet they are passing laws that govern that society. That's a big reason that we can't move forward I believe. They are constantly trying to take us back to their youth and society is nothing like it used to be when they grew up.
 
2013-06-15 01:22:40 AM
"...accidentally supported a pro-gay rights event last week before realizing he had entered the wrong door."


So to speak...
 
2013-06-15 01:33:20 AM

Gyrfalcon: Why was everyone at the LBGT event "shocked" at his presence? An old man shows up, acts polite for a little bit, then leaves: What's the "shock"? Why not invite him to stay a while? He's almost as old as my grandmother, for chrissakes, at least I can understand why HE would be a DOMA advocate.

And in re the horrors over his age--you would not be annoyed if my aged grandmother were serving the state of Florida as one of their Representatives, even if she is a die-hard Republican. The problem would be (like this old man) getting her in and out of the building in a timely fashion. Age =/= retardation, any more than youth = sharp mind and brilliant insight into social issues. Remind me to tell you about her minor contribution to the integration of West Virginia education some time.




Your grandmother may still be sharp as a tack, but the link between aging and the risk of dementia isn't imaginary.
The number of cases of dementia worldwide in 2010 was estimated at 35.6 million.[59] Rates increase significantly with age, with dementia affecting 5% of the population older than 65 and 20-40% of those older than 85.

At 47, I find that my mind seems a tiny bit slower to remember facts than it used to be. I don't suspect early onset dementia, just the normal changes associated with aging.
 
2013-06-15 01:42:02 AM

draa: For me, the problem with all the old people serving in Congress is that most of them don't have a farking clue about the struggles of today's youth. Or the current cultural issues that's going on today. They are out of touch with modern society and yet they are passing laws that govern that society. That's a big reason that we can't move forward I believe. They are constantly trying to take us back to their youth and society is nothing like it used to be when they grew up.


My grandparents used to wonder aloud why I couldn't get through college working a menial job and just saving the money, especially during summers. I wasn't irritated for them thinking that, but it demonstrated a real ignorance of my situation. And this was the 90s - it's far worse now.

I got somewhat lucky in that I was a bartender (waking up for class was pure hell, though), and made far more than minimum wage. It still wasn't close enough to just up and write a check even for a state school. But in the past it actually was possible to work a summer job and cover your books and tuition. I never asked their opinion but I imagine they would believe $7.25 an hour to be enough to be housed and fed without going on government assistance. And remember, that $7.25 was only recently raised.

Grandmom in particular would remind me of how her family survived the Depression, and asked why I couldn't make the same sacrifices. Really? I'm already eating Ramen or mac 'n cheese, living in a sh*thole apartment in a ghetto because I could no longer afford the dorms unless I worked 50 hours per week (impossible if you want decent grades and work at night). I'm not comparing my experience to her Depression childhood, but c'mon, old people assume that getting a job flipping burgers is enough to get ahead in life.

So I took out the same Stafford loans 75% of this thread probably did. Paying it back is easier than trying to pay bills and also come up with ever-increasing educational expenses each year. I even toyed with the idea of military, but am glad I didn't because I was even more of an anti-authority asshole then than I am now.
 
2013-06-15 01:56:27 AM

BravadoGT: He's NINETY.  They didn't have gays back in his time.  They were just "fops" or "dandies"


You're forgetting "confirmed bachelors" and "hunting buddies."
 
2013-06-15 02:09:38 AM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: /if we can't have term limits, can we at least have a freaking mandatory retirement age?


Short answer: No.

Longer answer:

29 USC sec 623:
(a)Employer practices
It shall be unlawful for an employer
(1) to fail or refuse to hire or to discharge any individual or otherwise discriminate against any individual with respect to his compensation, terms, conditions, or privileges of employment, because of such individual's age;

That'd be federal anti-discrimination law, it applies to everyone over 40.
 
2013-06-15 02:10:20 AM

draa: Gyrfalcon: And in re the horrors over his age--you would not be annoyed if my aged grandmother were serving the state of Florida as one of their Representatives, even if she is a die-hard Republican. The problem would be (like this old man) getting her in and out of the building in a timely fashion. Age =/= retardation, any more than youth = sharp mind and brilliant insight into social issues. Remind me to tell you about her minor contribution to the integration of West Virginia education some time.

For me, the problem with all the old people serving in Congress is that most of them don't have a farking clue about the struggles of today's youth. Or the current cultural issues that's going on today. They are out of touch with modern society and yet they are passing laws that govern that society. That's a big reason that we can't move forward I believe. They are constantly trying to take us back to their youth and society is nothing like it used to be when they grew up.


Oh FFS, get over yourself. "The struggles of today's youth?" Seriously? Do you really think you and your little friends are a different breed than all the generations before? What a coincidence - every generation in history has thought the very same thing. "Current cultural issues that's going on today?" My biggest cultural issue is that people can somehow grow to adulthood without learning standard English, but that too has always been the case. Learn some history, and look up the word "solipsism" while you're at it.
 
2013-06-15 02:14:08 AM

DeaH: BravadoGT: He's NINETY.  They didn't have gays back in his time.  They were just "fops" or "dandies"

You're forgetting "confirmed bachelors" and "hunting buddies."


What about "homos"? I once heard my grandfather use that word. For some reason I can hear him saying the word "sycophants" in the same disdain tone of voice on a completely different time. I don't remember the context of either.
 
2013-06-15 02:16:10 AM

draa: Gyrfalcon: And in re the horrors over his age--you would not be annoyed if my aged grandmother were serving the state of Florida as one of their Representatives, even if she is a die-hard Republican. The problem would be (like this old man) getting her in and out of the building in a timely fashion. Age =/= retardation, any more than youth = sharp mind and brilliant insight into social issues. Remind me to tell you about her minor contribution to the integration of West Virginia education some time.

For me, the problem with all the old people serving in Congress is that most of them don't have a farking clue about the struggles of today's youth. Or the current cultural issues that's going on today. They are out of touch with modern society and yet they are passing laws that govern that society. That's a big reason that we can't move forward I believe. They are constantly trying to take us back to their youth and society is nothing like it used to be when they grew up.


Made me laugh.

"The struggles of today's youth" are exactly the same as they've always been - the rest of what you said.
 
2013-06-15 02:17:07 AM
And furthermore...

If what we're all assuming here is true - that this guy is a 90-year old closet case - just think how sad that is. To have lived so long without ever feeling comfortable in his own skin. I think there's a lesson there for everyone, of any age.
 
2013-06-15 02:17:42 AM
I for one commend Mr. Hall for being the first anti-gay congressman to attend a pro-gay event that didn't involve them having sex.
 
2013-06-15 02:20:18 AM
i44.tinypic.com 

?
 
2013-06-15 02:21:20 AM
Rep. Ralph Hall was a carrier pilot during WWII. Sixty nine years later and he's still kicking.
 
2013-06-15 02:24:09 AM

Kevin72: DeaH: BravadoGT: He's NINETY.  They didn't have gays back in his time.  They were just "fops" or "dandies"

You're forgetting "confirmed bachelors" and "hunting buddies."

What about "homos"? I once heard my grandfather use that word. For some reason I can hear him saying the word "sycophants" in the same disdain tone of voice on a completely different time. I don't remember the context of either.


No. No homos or gays back then. Your grandpa was probably talking about Homo sapiens. Or maybe he was a raw milk fan.
 
2013-06-15 02:49:17 AM

BMulligan: Oh FFS, get over yourself. "The struggles of today's youth?" Seriously? Do you really think you and your little friends are a different breed than all the generations before?


No you idiot - the costs have spiraled out of control.

I attended UC Berkeley from 1981 to 1986.  When I started, my fees as an in-state resident were about $1,050 a year. Minimum wage was $3.35 (although I don't remember any job paying less that $5 an hour). So my fees were 313 hours of work (pre-tax).  I worked about 30 hours a week, I could pay my fees with less than three months wages

Today that same school is $13,200 plus a $1,300 "health insurance fee".  So, $14,500. Minimum wage is $8.00. So that's 1,812 hours of work. To pay your fees for one year at that same 30 hours a week takes 14 months of work.

Yes, it really is different for this generation. It isn't that they have changed, its that the costs have gone through the roof.

financemymoney.com
 
2013-06-15 02:50:06 AM

DeaH: Kevin72: DeaH: BravadoGT: He's NINETY.  They didn't have gays back in his time.  They were just "fops" or "dandies"

You're forgetting "confirmed bachelors" and "hunting buddies."

What about "homos"? I once heard my grandfather use that word. For some reason I can hear him saying the word "sycophants" in the same disdain tone of voice on a completely different time. I don't remember the context of either.

No. No homos or gays back then. Your grandpa was probably talking about Homo sapiens. Or maybe he was a raw milk fan.


It would have been in the 70s, as my grandfather stayed around until 1979, and only that one time. By the 70s, gays started to be visible.

/Fun fact: my grandfather in the 1970s predicted that if Florida kept growing, it would be the #3 state in population. Very soon that will happen.
 
2013-06-15 02:58:07 AM

MisterRonbo: BMulligan: Oh FFS, get over yourself. "The struggles of today's youth?" Seriously? Do you really think you and your little friends are a different breed than all the generations before?

No you idiot - the costs have spiraled out of control.

I attended UC Berkeley from 1981 to 1986.  When I started, my fees as an in-state resident were about $1,050 a year. Minimum wage was $3.35 (although I don't remember any job paying less that $5 an hour). So my fees were 313 hours of work (pre-tax).  I worked about 30 hours a week, I could pay my fees with less than three months wages

Today that same school is $13,200 plus a $1,300 "health insurance fee".  So, $14,500. Minimum wage is $8.00. So that's 1,812 hours of work. To pay your fees for one year at that same 30 hours a week takes 14 months of work.

Yes, it really is different for this generation. It isn't that they have changed, its that the costs have gone through the roof.

[financemymoney.com image 500x732]


Well, SOMEONE has to pay for Bush's war in Iraq. Why shouldn't it be the generation that will benefit the most from the peace and security?
 
2013-06-15 02:58:10 AM

BMulligan: Seriously? Do you really think you and your little friends are a different breed than all the generations before?


Well, I'm 48 years old so if you are calling me young I want to thank you. And then you can go fark yourself.

It's about staying in touch with the progress of society. Many old people don't do that. I know that if I'm having problems then people 30 goddamn years older than me must be as well. Especially people in Congress.
 
2013-06-15 03:09:55 AM
 
2013-06-15 03:23:32 AM

draa: BMulligan: Seriously? Do you really think you and your little friends are a different breed than all the generations before?

Well, I'm 48 years old so if you are calling me young I want to thank you. And then you can go fark yourself.

It's about staying in touch with the progress of society. Many old people don't do that. I know that if I'm having problems then people 30 goddamn years older than me must be as well. Especially people in Congress.


I think I see the issue here. I'm only four years older than you, so we're pretty much the same cohort (although Vietnam probably was still a little more scary for me than for you). If you're like me, you're feeling your age a little. That's  our problem; no one else's. Thirty-year olds have no idea why we feel out of place when we go to get a pint at the pub on the corner (which seems to have turned into some kind of hipster joint), and eighty-year olds are laughing at us for being young and dumb. Welcome to your midlife crisis, my friend!

As far as staying in touch with the culture as a prerequisite to effective government, forget about it. First of all, some of the most reactionary thinking comes from the young. Look at the Iranian revolution - guys in their twenties and thirties, wanting to recapture the glory of the 11th Century. Today in America, young hedge fund managers fresh out of Wharton are in training to be the Koch brothers of tomorrow. Second, you don't need a lot of cultural sensitivity to direct fiscal policy, and foreign policy is just chess. Other than that, the government never directs change, it always just gets dragged along along with the rest of society. There is always an avant garde, and by definition, most of us aren't in it.
 
m00
2013-06-15 03:33:24 AM

kronicfeld: And we still let him serve in Congress. Pathetic.


It's because seniority dictates how much you can actually get done for your state.
 
2013-06-15 03:34:34 AM

BMulligan: First of all, some of the most reactionary thinking comes from the young. Look at the Iranian revolution - guys in their twenties and thirties, wanting to recapture the glory of the 11th Century.


Yes, I'm sure you have your finger on the pulse of the younger generation in Iran. No doubt its about wanting to implement a stricter form of Islam than they already have.  The way the government has wrecked the economy, the underground nightclubs where men and women mingle and even drink, everything I've read about mobile phones being used to circumvent the cultural edicts from the ayatollahs - none of that is true.

Because BMulligan knows what's going on in Iran. And from that, extrapolates to how youth everywhere are really just reactionaries harkening back to a far, far earlier time.

This is why I love the internet. I get exposed to the ridiculous things people actually believe.
 
2013-06-15 03:40:01 AM

I_Am_Weasel: he had entered the wrong door.
I'm going to have to write that one down.


That's probably what a lot of these anti-gay congressmen say when caught up in some sort of gay scandal Went in the wrong door, the backdoor.
 
2013-06-15 04:03:27 AM

BMulligan: I think I see the issue here.


I'm not sure you do. It was about old people in Congress making laws that affect our kids in negative ways. That's what I said. I wasn't talking about me or you because we are both irrelevant to the discussion unless it pertains to our children. Besides, we can't change anything outside our sphere of influence. Congresscritters can.

When you have people in their 70's and 80's(and in the case of the guy in this article their 90's) trying to relate to kids in their 20's and 30's they simply can't do it. Those people, in both political groups, can no more relate to our kids than we can relate to people's issues during Prohibition. Or WW2. Hell, I'd bet that they can't even relate to our issues as middle age citizens, much less or children's.

As far as a middle age crisis? Nope. That's already come and gone. It's not me that I'm worried about. It's my kids. If the people who have the power to make changes are too damn old to understand the problems of our kids(not all are, but some certainly are), they have no business with that power to begin with.
 
2013-06-15 04:24:27 AM

draa: BMulligan: I think I see the issue here.

I'm not sure you do. It was about old people in Congress making laws that affect our kids in negative ways. That's what I said. I wasn't talking about me or you because we are both irrelevant to the discussion unless it pertains to our children. Besides, we can't change anything outside our sphere of influence. Congresscritters can.

When you have people in their 70's and 80's(and in the case of the guy in this article their 90's) trying to relate to kids in their 20's and 30's they simply can't do it. Those people, in both political groups, can no more relate to our kids than we can relate to people's issues during Prohibition. Or WW2. Hell, I'd bet that they can't even relate to our issues as middle age citizens, much less or children's.

As far as a middle age crisis? Nope. That's already come and gone. It's not me that I'm worried about. It's my kids. If the people who have the power to make changes are too damn old to understand the problems of our kids(not all are, but some certainly are), they have no business with that power to begin with.


Oh, piffle, that's not the problem at all. The next generation up totally understands your alleged worries about "your kids" because where the fark do you think you came from? You think you dropped off the moon whole & breathing and with two or three kids already in the cradle? No, this old man, like my grandmother, and my mom, and the oldsters in Congress now, all were where you are now, once, with kids, and thinking, "Goddamn, those old farts in the legislature shouldn't be making decisions for MY precious darlings! I've got to be the ones making those decisions, and fast!"

Issues are issues: Whether people can make ends meet, keep their kids educated, food on the table, a roof over their heads. And problems are problems: How to afford a new car, a new house, braces for Junior's teeth, baseball gear for Susie, college funds, and still pay the mortgage after Dad's hours get cut at the factory. It doesn't matter whether you were born before or after WWII, those are still the same things. The divide is ONLY about how much stuff costs (hint: It's more nowadays) and how easy or hard it may be to find work after you get laid off; but that's got nothing to do with age. That issue has to do with how amenable someone is to learning facts.

There are plenty of people of older generations (my aged grandmother among them) who are more than willing to be exposed to new ideas, learn from past mistakes, and admit they were wrong. There are plenty of people younger than me (I'm 49) who will never admit their worldview is flawed and that things are not the way they thought. We have a person younger than me right now who ran as Republican vice-presidential candidate who, I submit to you, has considerably less ability to "relate to our children's issues" than many people in their 70's and 80's. On the flip side, there's an old man sitting in the VP slot right now who probably relates much better than you might give him credit for, based on his mature years. Horny old goat, by all accounts.

There was a time, about 40 or 50 years ago, when it was fashionable to say "Never trust anyone over 30," because, supposedly, old people could never understand how things really were for young people. Those same people are the ones mostly running the government right now. How'd that attitude work out for them, I wonder?
 
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