Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Army Times)   "Microsoft has single handedly alienated the entire military. And not just the U.S. military - the militaries of the entire world," says naval aviator Jay Johnson   (armytimes.com ) divider line
    More: Sad, Microsoft, U.S., Xbox, U.S. military, delivery vehicles, Electronic Entertainment Expo, USS Abraham Lincoln, sleep mode  
•       •       •

10258 clicks; posted to Geek » on 14 Jun 2013 at 9:11 PM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



175 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | » | Newest | Show all

 
2013-06-15 11:48:35 AM  

BullBearMS: Flint Ironstag: Apple don't require any protection against bootleg copies of their OS since you need one of their computers to instal it on.

No. No you don't.


When even the link you provide says thing like "Things go wrong with hackintoshes all the time. It's unlikely you'll create one without running into, at least, a minor dilemma. A lot of troubleshooting involves trial and error, unfortunately, and you'll just have to tinker around until you get the problem fixed" then yo know it's not an option that millions of people use or a problem for Apple.

Plus even  on Apple support forums
it is said doing so is against Apple TOS and violates their EULA.
 
2013-06-15 12:55:51 PM  
I used to troll pretty hard against the 360, but I did buy one to go with my launch PS3. I have to admit that this gen, the 360's party capabilities make hooking up with friends to play online infinitely easier. That said, the PS4 sounds like it will close that gap, and I'm not seeing any compelling reason to buy the Xbox One. It's more expensive, it forces me to buy a peripheral that I find idiotic, its core hardware is inferior, and they want me to pay $100 more for that. The Live capabilities better be damn amazing (or the new PSN better really suck) if this thing isn't going to fail hard.
 
2013-06-15 01:00:20 PM  

Sandwyrm: JolobinSmokin: They knew what they were getting into when they signed up.

If my military has enough time to play Xbox on a nuclear sub, we have way to big of a military.

Your point is valid, but here's the other side.  Of the entire deployed military, only a small percentage are actual combat units (the rest being administrative, logistics, etc.).  Of all these combat units, only a small percentage are engaged in a combat role (patrolling and such), the rest are there for backup.  For those who are not in combat roles, you need some way to distract yourself from thinking about home and what your wife/girlfriend is doing.  You can only waste so many hours at the gym before you start going a little kooky, and video games help with that.


My oldest son did 7 months combat in Afghanistan. Down time was lifting weights and playing Skyrim on PS3 with NO UPDATES.
 
2013-06-15 01:06:11 PM  
The problem for Microsoft on this issue is a lot worse than losing military members as customers.... they also lose their families, and their extended families and friends by word-of-mouth. Military families tend to be pretty loyal to the cause, so to speak.

Also, you'll lose the easy money purchases - servicemen fresh out of boot camp, with a fistful of cash.

...and what about those leaving service? You think they'll easily forget how Microsoft screwed them over while they were IN the service?

You are talking about a group of people (servicemen and women, their family and friends) intensely loyal to CAUSES - a group of people who are extremely sensitive to BETRAYAL = and Microsoft has given them a cause because of its betrayal of men in uniform, performing the most hazardous duty for their country.
 
2013-06-15 01:11:30 PM  
While I realize I've been out for a while, there were gaming systems when I was in the military and had to go to the desert.  That said, we never saw them.  At most we were lucky to have a TV and VCR for watching movies during down-time.  But mostly we worked out, played cards and dominoes, read books, and otherwise entertained ourselves.

So I guess what I'm saying is, they'll get over it.  The military is not entitled to having the latest and greatest gaming system while deployed.  They will adapt and overcome.
 
2013-06-15 01:14:18 PM  
I don't get paid to sit around and play Xbox at my job.

But then, I get to come home every night, the risk of death is basically zero, and the risk of PTSD nearly as low.
 
2013-06-15 01:18:00 PM  

BigMevy: While I realize I've been out for a while, there were gaming systems when I was in the military and had to go to the desert.  That said, we never saw them.  At most we were lucky to have a TV and VCR for watching movies during down-time.  But mostly we worked out, played cards and dominoes, read books, and otherwise entertained ourselves.

So I guess what I'm saying is, they'll get over it.  The military is not entitled to having the latest and greatest gaming system while deployed.  They will adapt and overcome.


And their way to "adapt and overcome" will be to buy a PS4.
 
2013-06-15 01:55:29 PM  

Sandwyrm: Flappyhead: Anyway, Sony should turn up the troll-o-meter to 11 and launch a campaign to sell PS4s at a discount to active servicemen/women and top it off with a video ending with "Whether you're downrange, overseas or on a nuclear sub, you deserve to play great games."

If they seriously do that, they would win me over, and I'd stop skipping over Sony equipment when looking to buy consumer electronics.


Just to make it clear, Sony operates each division seperately, the divisions have almost no central control. So Sony Gaming being good guys right now has nothing to do with Sony Music or Sony Movies divisions. Its the reason you saw Sony Electronics release DVD copying equipment while Sony Music was trying to rootkit anything who thought about copying their music.
 
2013-06-15 02:49:57 PM  

Zenith: hadn't thought of this point before and clearly neither had Microsoft and I can think of another bunch of guys with some time and money on their hands and that's the offshore industry (especially in the North Sea in Europe) no xbox ones will work on the rigs, support vessels and barges either.
oops


You are 100% correct on this. As a former service member and and a current offshore worker (ROV/ Subsea robotics) they can eat a bag of dicks. I spend 6 months out of the year on an offshore installation. We work 12 hour shifts with 12 hours downtime. I currently have an xbox360 and a wii that I leave offshore. Our internet is spotty at best (roughly 500 BYTES to 6k download speeds). It is good enough to check emails and Fark around but not much else. Looks like they will not be getting any more of my cash.

I am also not a Sony fan. They look good right now just because their direct competitor looks so bad. I guess I will be sticking with my wii u and 3ds.
 
2013-06-15 02:56:01 PM  

Flint Ironstag: BullBearMS: Flint Ironstag: Apple don't require any protection against bootleg copies of their OS since you need one of their computers to instal it on.

No. No you don't.

When even the link you provide says thing like "Things go wrong with hackintoshes all the time. It's unlikely you'll create one without running into, at least, a minor dilemma. A lot of troubleshooting involves trial and error, unfortunately, and you'll just have to tinker around until you get the problem fixed" then yo know it's not an option that millions of people use or a problem for Apple.

Plus even  on Apple support forums
it is said doing so is against Apple TOS and violates their EULA.


My god. He's full of tard.

Can you buy generic PC hardware and install Mac OS on it without any DRM whatsoever?

Yes. Yes you can.

Do you have to stick to hardware there are good Mac OS drivers for?

Well, yes, tard. You do. Just like you have to in Windows or Unix or Linux.

Hardware doesn't work without drivers.

It's just like the days when you had to stick to only using components on the Windows 2000 Hardware Compatibility List. No DRM. Zero issues.
 
2013-06-15 03:12:16 PM  
You know, I stood by Microsoft with the removal of the Start button. I've been using computers and other GUIs for too long to not know how to adapt to the latest design (full disclosure: I don't have Windows 8, but if I were to get a new PC it would probably be on it and I would get used to it).

But this is just too stupid. I don't even share or trade my games very often, but I can see just how anti-consumer this move really is. It isn't even about stopping piracy anymore, it is about the publisher rewriting the rules to their exclusive benefit.

People like to compare this to Steam, but that is a digital download. I also get the benefit that my licenses are up in the cloud, so I can load them on any PC I want simply by logging in. While the X1 does have some of these benefits, I believe MS has said that adding or changing a Live account on these systems is not easy. A better comparison would be PC software which limits the number of installs by calling home, but that is why the retail PC market continues to suffer in favour of digital downloads.

PERHAPS if Microsoft made game cards with activations codes the primary way of distributing games, they would have an argument. But even if they switched to that immediately, they have opened a Pandora's Box.

Finally, the ultimately irony here is that this will mean that a larger chunk of people buying X1s will be pirates who will break the DRM and play whatever they want. Meanwhile legitimate consumers will buy a PS4 which has fair and reasonable copy protections.
 
2013-06-15 03:30:53 PM  
Welcome to Corporate Love, biatches.   do as your told and stop whining.  you've got 'Freedom' (and Property/Capital) to protect.
 
2013-06-15 04:26:28 PM  

Electrify: Finally, the ultimately irony here is that this will mean that a larger chunk of people buying X1s will be pirates who will break the DRM and play whatever they want.


This.  I really want this thing to be cracked wide open.  I missed out on the original XBOX mods that allowed HDD ripping and other perks, as well as the PS2 w/ linux.  360 was pretty tight.

I'd love to see either of these new consoles opened.  I don't pirate games, but love the flexibility and novelty.
 
2013-06-15 04:37:50 PM  

Flint Ironstag: Apple don't require any protection against bootleg copies of their OS since you need one of their computers to instal it on.


That isn't entirely true. Besides, the complete 64 bit unlimited edition of OS X is $30.
 
2013-06-15 05:04:20 PM  
BullBearMS: Can you buy generic PC hardware and install Mac OS on it without any DRM whatsoever?

Yes. Yes you can.

Do you have to stick to hardware there are good Mac OS drivers for?

Well, yes, tard. You do. Just like you have to in Windows or Unix or Linux.

Hardware doesn't work without drivers.

It's just like the days when you had to stick to only using components on the Windows 2000 Hardware Compatibility List. No DRM. Zero issues.


Don't the Intel Macs come with a TPM chip that proves to Mac OS that the computer is an actual Mac?  I think that qualifies as DRM.

I'm sure there are cracks out there to get around it, of course.  The lack of device drivers would still be the more difficult problem.
 
2013-06-15 05:21:49 PM  

anfrind: Don't the Intel Macs come with a TPM chip that proves to Mac OS that the computer is an actual Mac? I think that qualifies as DRM.


No.

Mac OSX has no DRM whatsoever.

Intel based Macs did start using EFI instead of the BIOS years before Windows, but that's hardly a problem now.
 
2013-06-15 06:55:13 PM  

BullBearMS: anfrind: Don't the Intel Macs come with a TPM chip that proves to Mac OS that the computer is an actual Mac? I think that qualifies as DRM.

No.

Mac OSX has no DRM whatsoever.

Intel based Macs did start using EFI instead of the BIOS years before Windows, but that's hardly a problem now.


I just looked into it a little more closely, and it looks like Apple included TPM chips from 2006 to 2009, but the OS never actually used them in any way.
 
2013-06-15 07:17:50 PM  

anfrind: BullBearMS: anfrind: Don't the Intel Macs come with a TPM chip that proves to Mac OS that the computer is an actual Mac? I think that qualifies as DRM.

No.

Mac OSX has no DRM whatsoever.

Intel based Macs did start using EFI instead of the BIOS years before Windows, but that's hardly a problem now.

I just looked into it a little more closely, and it looks like Apple included TPM chips from 2006 to 2009, but the OS never actually used them in any way.


Apple doesn't even use so much as a product key in any of it's consumer software (iWork, iLife) or their OS. Much less intrusive DRM.
 
2013-06-15 07:58:33 PM  

BullBearMS: Apple doesn't even use so much as a product key in any of it's consumer software (iWork, iLife) or their OS. Much less intrusive DRM.


You sure about that?  Because I have a box for iWork '08 on my shelf right now that includes a product key.

I suppose that may have been somewhat justified in that you could download an unregistered version from their website for free, and try it out for 30 days before having to register.  Although I'm sure it no longer works that way, since Apple now sells all of its software through the Mac App Store.
 
2013-06-15 08:31:47 PM  

anfrind: You sure about that?


I'm quite certain.

Apple has made the decision to no longer require a serial number for the retail copy of iWork. It doesn't require any online activation, and - in the same fashion as iLife - would seem to have no piracy prevention as such.

Apple notes that:

iWork '09 retail boxes no longer come with a serial number. Install iWork '09 from the enclosed disc and you're ready to go.


The restrictive DRM and license key bullshiat are all on the Microsoft side. Apple doesn't use them at all.

Also, unlike with Windows 8 Metro apps, the Apple App store in Mac OS is completely optional. Nobody is twisting your arm to make you use it.

One advantage for people who do choose to buy from the Mac App Store is that vendors who sell through it are required to allow you to install the app you pay for on up to five computers at no extra cost. (If you own that many)

So after you pay ten bucks for Apple's word processor, or 30 bucks for the last OS update you can install them onto five different Macs without paying an additional dime.
 
2013-06-15 11:12:53 PM  

remus: Every guy I ever knew that got deployed went down range with some type of gaming machine (either a lap top or a console).  They spent most of their down time playing because, what else are you going to do off duty in the sand box?

I foresee heavy sales of PS4 at BX and PX stores in the future.


Judging by some of the rather lavish artwork I saw in the portajohns while I was there, I'd say masturbating. But that goes without saying.
 
2013-06-16 02:20:20 AM  
Microsoft is waging war against their loyal xbox customers....this is a great strategy, for failure.
 
2013-06-16 02:33:53 AM  
Sold my 360 and went to PC when I moved out of the US. I planned on getting a Xbox One when I returned and finish off some of the 360 games I wanted to finish.

It looks like I will stick to PC, keep an eye on the PS4 exclusive list and pick up a used 360 to play some backlogged games. Then in a few years buy a used Wii U, play their catalog of 1st party games and toss it.

Except that funny thing called life continues to get in the way and I already have games from steam sales 3 years ago that I have not played...
 
2013-06-16 03:53:32 AM  

BullBearMS: anfrind: You sure about that?

I'm quite certain.

Apple has made the decision to no longer require a serial number for the retail copy of iWork. It doesn't require any online activation, and - in the same fashion as iLife - would seem to have no piracy prevention as such.

Apple notes that:

iWork '09 retail boxes no longer come with a serial number. Install iWork '09 from the enclosed disc and you're ready to go.

The restrictive DRM and license key bullshiat are all on the Microsoft side. Apple doesn't use them at all.

Also, unlike with Windows 8 Metro apps, the Apple App store in Mac OS is completely optional. Nobody is twisting your arm to make you use it.

One advantage for people who do choose to buy from the Mac App Store is that vendors who sell through it are required to allow you to install the app you pay for on up to five computers at no extra cost. (If you own that many)

So after you pay ten bucks for Apple's word processor, or 30 bucks for the last OS update you can install them onto five different Macs without paying an additional dime.


People love to bash Apple on all their "restrictions", but Steve Jobs was always very anti-DRM, and it shows in the company culture.  Not only is all their software DRM and serial-number free, they actually encourage you to go ahead and install it on all your computers.  They use it as a selling point - buy once, install throughout the house.

And remember Jobs is the one who finally convinced music content rights holders to give up the ghost using DRM on iTunes.  When they did and iTunes went DRM-free, all of your previously DRM'd music was automatically upgraded to non-DRM versions.  Apple didn't have to do all this - there was no huge financial benefit or incentive.  As usual, it was all about the user experience, and Apple knows full well that no DRM is a superior user experience, every time.

This situation is nothing like Apple or has anything to do with "arrogance" like Apple's.  This is a classic case of a company being utterly tone-deaf to what its customers actually want.  The only people that perceive Apple as shoving things down customers throats aren't Apple customers, or else they would understand that Apple's actual customers - the people who buy their products - are usually delighted with those products.  They don't listen to pundits, who are not customers, and so those pundits deem them "arrogant", but in reality they're just catering to their customers and only to their customers.  They don't give a shiat what the non-customers think, and that's not "arrogant", it's right.  It's a fine line and they walk it perfectly.

Microsoft is doing nothing like that - they're alienating customers and non-customers alike, and their behavior is truly arrogant.  They installed all this stuff that nobody wants because it was in their best interest, supposedly.  It won't do them much good, of course, when it doesn't sell.  At no time did they think about what the user experience was going to be like, or else they would have dumped the garbage right out of the gate.  They simply thought, "What would benefit us and our partners the most, customers be damned?" and then turned that nonsense up to 11, and if there were voices of reason in those meeting rooms, they were utterly ignored.  Apple would never in your wildest dreams release a product with restrictions like the Xbox One is going to have.
 
2013-06-16 04:04:48 AM  

blackartemis: Except that funny thing called life continues to get in the way and I already have games from steam sales 3 years ago that I have not played...


Oh god, tell me about it.  I just checked my library: 127 games.  Admittedly a good number of the unplayed ones are Humble Bundle titles but quite a few aren't, like both Witcher games, Mass Effect, Oblivion, some of the Painkiller titles, L.A. Noire, Bulletstorm... I've got probably a good thousand hours of gameplay sitting on my account waiting for me to play it.

The worst part is that I know, even with all this stuff waiting for me, that I'm going to buy more stuff the next time there's a Steam Sale.  God dammit so much Steam, stop throwing $10 AAA titles at me.
 
Displayed 25 of 175 comments


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | » | Newest | Show all


View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter






In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report