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(Hartford Courant)   Cook survives two days under the water in a shipwreck with the help of an air bubble - spends the time doing dishes with SpongeBob SquarePants   (courant.com) divider line 23
    More: Strange, shipwrecks, niger delta  
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2013-06-14 11:20:23 AM
The legend lives on from the Chippewa on down to the lake that they call Gitchigumi

/wonder if the cook said "Fellas, it's been good to know ya"?
 
2013-06-14 11:24:22 AM
Poor guy was on the throne when the boat capsized. There's a good chance that the "air" bubble he was in for two days was not entirely air (if you catch my flatus drift).
 
2013-06-14 11:24:22 AM
encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com

where there sharks after him?
 
2013-06-14 11:25:15 AM
 
2013-06-14 11:25:48 AM
4.bp.blogspot.com

/obscure?
 
2013-06-14 11:26:08 AM
Hmmm this sounds suspiciously like a repeat... *checks link* ... Yep it's a repeat.
 
2013-06-14 11:26:55 AM
 
2013-06-14 11:27:12 AM
Not sure this story is true - it has the tall tale signature so common to African/Indian stories. If it is true I feel bad for this guy because there is no way he is not going to have nightmares about his ordeal the rest of his life...
 
2013-06-14 11:30:34 AM
I'm trying to understand why he wouldn't swim out long before that. You would think that claustrophobia and fear of suffocating would be sufficient motivation to risk it.

But it worked out for him, so what do I know. Except for the horrible, horrible nightmares he's going to have for the rest of his life, of course.
 
2013-06-14 11:36:27 AM

sniderman: /obscure?


Not if you have a scotch boiler and a lifetime supply of parakeets.
 
2013-06-14 11:39:25 AM
Gully Foyle is my name
And Terra is my nation
Deep space is my dwelling place
And death's my destination.
...
Gully Foyle is my name
And Terra is my nation
Deep space is my dwelling place
The stars my destination
 
2013-06-14 11:39:54 AM
I didn't quite grasp all the finer points of deco schedules last thread... can we flesh all that out again??
 
2013-06-14 11:42:24 AM

Jument: I'm trying to understand why he wouldn't swim out long before that. You would think that claustrophobia and fear of suffocating would be sufficient motivation to risk it.

But it worked out for him, so what do I know. Except for the horrible, horrible nightmares he's going to have for the rest of his life, of course.


He probably can't swim dickhead.  Most 3rd world sailors can't.
 
2013-06-14 11:43:52 AM

dk47: Jument: I'm trying to understand why he wouldn't swim out long before that. You would think that claustrophobia and fear of suffocating would be sufficient motivation to risk it.

But it worked out for him, so what do I know. Except for the horrible, horrible nightmares he's going to have for the rest of his life, of course.

He probably can't swim dickhead.  Most 3rd world sailors can't.


Yes, I understand that. See my point about motivation, dickhead.
 
2013-06-14 11:45:36 AM
Revenge of the skrimps
 
2013-06-14 11:54:05 AM
if only these guys had an air bubble

4.bp.blogspot.com

www.lostreview.com
 
2013-06-14 11:54:07 AM

Elzar: Not sure this story is true - it has the tall tale signature so common to African/Indian stories. If it is true I feel bad for this guy because there is no way he is not going to have nightmares about his ordeal the rest of his life...


It has to be total bullshiate.  They put him through a decompression cycle?  Why?  He wasn't consuming decompressed air.  He was supposedly in a container that was above surface and then forced to the bottom.  That is not compression of the air in a manner that would compress nitrogen leaving residual compressed nitrogen gas within his bloodstream or other tissue that would require decompression; not to mention 60 hours in "freezing" water.  You can die of hypothermia after 15 hours in the warm 75 degree waters of the upper Gulf of Mexico.

This is a nice Poseidon Adventure story.  Now that I think about it, he does look a lot like Ernest Borgnine.
 
2013-06-14 11:55:35 AM

Magnus: Elzar: Not sure this story is true - it has the tall tale signature so common to African/Indian stories. If it is true I feel bad for this guy because there is no way he is not going to have nightmares about his ordeal the rest of his life...

It has to be total bullshiate.  They put him through a decompression cycle?  Why?  He wasn't consuming decompressed air.  He was supposedly in a container that was above surface and then forced to the bottom.  That is not compression of the air in a manner that would compress nitrogen leaving residual compressed nitrogen gas within his bloodstream or other tissue that would require decompression; not to mention 60 hours in "freezing" water.  You can die of hypothermia after 15 hours in the warm 75 degree waters of the upper Gulf of Mexico.

This is a nice Poseidon Adventure story.  Now that I think about it, he does look a lot like Ernest Borgnine.


He wasn't consuming compressed air...sorry.
 
2013-06-14 12:05:08 PM
This guy just has no goddamn luck at all.  Twice in less than a week!!
 
2013-06-14 12:06:37 PM

Jument: I'm trying to understand why he wouldn't swim out long before that. You would think that claustrophobia and fear of suffocating would be sufficient motivation to risk it.


If he had tried he'd have to find his way out of the ship upside down and in the dark and then swim straight up for 30 meters all in one breath and he had no way of knowing how deep the ship was. In the unlikely event he managed the swim it still would have been a death sentence as he would have been dead pretty much immediately from the bends. His only option for surviving was to hope someone found him.
 
2013-06-14 12:08:51 PM

Magnus: He wasn't consuming decompressed air. He was supposedly in a container that was above surface and then forced to the bottom.


As the boat sank, the air pressure in the bubble increased to match the pressure of the water around it.
 
2013-06-14 01:12:40 PM
Now we know what Bubble Buddy has been doing all this time.
i39.tinypic.com
Happy Leif Erickson Day!  Hinga Dinga Durgen!
 
2013-06-14 04:03:02 PM
Only one way out. Flood the compartment and swim up. Five decks, cookie. Five farkin' decks. Locked bulkheads, dead bodies everywhere. You got to have your balls screwed on tight for that swim.
 
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