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(Colorado Springs Gazette)   "Hello, DirecTV? My house was destroyed in a fire so I need to cancel my account." "No problem, sir. That will be $400 for the dish that was on your house"   (gazette.com) divider line 161
    More: Asinine, Direct TV, Black Forest  
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6205 clicks; posted to Main » on 14 Jun 2013 at 7:21 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-06-14 07:01:07 AM  
That's what homeowners insurance is for
 
2013-06-14 07:23:03 AM  
Exactly. Yeah it sucks that something bad happened to you, but you rented the dish from them. That's how it works.
 
2013-06-14 07:24:00 AM  
Um... Yeah... That's how it works.a contract is a contract and it should be covered by isurance
 
2013-06-14 07:26:41 AM  
Your house is destroyed by fire.  It is saddening and I do feel sorry for you.  But, are all your bills then supposed to magically disappear?

Electric, Gas, Phone, internet, TV and Water bills for the month, up to the time of the fire, just magically go "poof"?

They're playing the P.R. nightmare card, bringing it to the media's attention, in hopes of getting out of it.
 
2013-06-14 07:27:39 AM  
Argh Wargarbl!!! Big corporations cheating the little guy!!!! (a.k.a. the outrage subby was looking for)
 
2013-06-14 07:31:11 AM  
"I couldn't believe it," he said Thursday. "I had lost everything and they acted like they could'NT care less."

They couldn't.
 
2013-06-14 07:31:11 AM  

Securitywyrm: Exactly. Yeah it sucks that something bad happened to you, but you rented the dish from them. That's how it works.


And presumably your home/content insurance should cover it. Seems like it should be a non-issue.
 
2013-06-14 07:31:35 AM  
Does he expect the bank to forgive his mortgage too?
 
2013-06-14 07:32:21 AM  
If you had something valuable in your house that belonged to me, and said "something valuable" was destroyed in a fire, I'd expect you to pay me for it.
 
2013-06-14 07:35:43 AM  
At least they let him cancel.  I remember Verizon charging me $200 to cancel my father's cell phone even after I brought them a copy of the death certificate.
 
2013-06-14 07:37:09 AM  

abhorrent1: Does he expect the bank to forgive his mortgage too?


He should. At least in Canada, banks tend to require insurance (with the bank as beneficiary) as a condition for granting that mortgage. House burns down, insurance pays off the mortgage, everybody walks away.
 
2013-06-14 07:37:22 AM  

markfara: If you had something valuable in your house that belonged to me, and that aforementioned said "something valuable" was destroyed in a fire, I'd expect you to pay me for it.


It's early. Sorry.
 
2013-06-14 07:38:37 AM  
If for some reason this guy has no fire insurance I can understand him making a fuss. but if he has insurance and they pay off the $400 this is just a money grab as I'm sure he will include it in his claim even if Direct TV waves the $400.

I always love this type of quote
"I tried to explain that a couple hundred dollars is nothing to them but a lot to me," said Beach. "I need that money. I can use it to buy diapers, clothes for my family."

Maybe if you didn't spend the money on direct tv in the first place you would have money in savings to pay for those diapers and clothes for your family
 
2013-06-14 07:39:00 AM  

Koodz: At least they let him cancel.  I remember Verizon charging me $200 to cancel my father's cell phone even after I brought them a copy of the death certificate.


You're not responsible for your parents debt.
 
2013-06-14 07:39:20 AM  
Just be glad he wasn't renting his furniture.
 
2013-06-14 07:40:18 AM  
Sounds legit to me.
 
2013-06-14 07:40:20 AM  
One of these threads again?

Yes, your insurance, (homeowners or renters, you are responsible and spend the like 75 bucks a year for renters insurance, right?) will take care of it, which is why direct tv will bill you. If they did not, anyone who wanted to get out of any contract ever could just make up some sob story, and companies would then have to play detective on everything.

Koodz: At least they let him cancel.  I remember Verizon charging me $200 to cancel my father's cell phone even after I brought them a copy of the death certificate.


Why shouldn't they? They are no different than any other creditor, be it a credit card, a mortgage, whatever, that the estate is OBLIGATED to pay out. Had your father died destitute, or had mr burnt dish mcdish been destitute, there are procedures in place to essentially say, "hey, we got nothing left to pay you with" to disolve the debt.

Lets say your dad owed 100k on his mortgage. Should the bank just say, "wow, sucks he is dead, we will forget about the 100k he owed us, enjoy the house!"
 
2013-06-14 07:40:31 AM  
Hi its the semi-annual directv/comcast whoever wouldn't give me free shiat just because something bad happened to me and I'm too lazy to add it to the insurance claim article!

In all seriousness though I don't know why DirecTV doesn't insure these things theirselves just to avoid the bad PR.  The cost of doing that has to be negligible.
 
2013-06-14 07:42:23 AM  
Is subby trolling or is the concept of personal responsiblity just alien to him?
 
2013-06-14 07:42:32 AM  
"I tried to explain that a couple hundred dollars is nothing to them but a lot to me," said Beach. "I need that money. I can use it to buy diapers, clothes for my family."

I'll bet it was a real struggle to pay the  TV bill every month. An American Tragedy, this story. Sniff.
 
2013-06-14 07:42:44 AM  

cheap_thoughts: Koodz: At least they let him cancel.  I remember Verizon charging me $200 to cancel my father's cell phone even after I brought them a copy of the death certificate.

You're not responsible for your parents debt.


No but If his dad has assets that were going to get passed on to him and he didn't want $200 to turn into $2000 + penalties/interest and a lawsuit against dads estate that would hold up its disposition it may be a good idea.
 
2013-06-14 07:43:42 AM  
The dish, huh? I couldn't *get* them to take that farking thing back when I cancelled my service. I ended up tossing it on a junk heap.
 
2013-06-14 07:44:37 AM  

cretinbob: That's what homeowners insurance is for


Came here to say this.
 
2013-06-14 07:44:38 AM  
I can see both sides of this.  It's an uncommon problem, but due to the number of dishes out there it happens enough to justify rewriting the contract a bit.  $400 is cheap compared to a little PR damage here and there.  Most customers trying to decide what provider to go with will latch onto any information they've heard or can easily Google.  Right or wrong, it's in DirectTV's best interest to absorb things like this.  Besides, it's not like they still don't get to write off the inventory loss.
 
2013-06-14 07:45:04 AM  

firesign: The dish, huh? I couldn't *get* them to take that farking thing back when I cancelled my service. I ended up tossing it on a junk heap.


The dish and 2 receivers....
 
2013-06-14 07:45:19 AM  

NickelP: Hi its the semi-annual directv/comcast whoever wouldn't give me free shiat just because something bad happened to me and I'm too lazy to add it to the insurance claim article!

In all seriousness though I don't know why DirecTV doesn't insure these things theirselves just to avoid the bad PR.  The cost of doing that has to be negligible.


Its a headache. If they tried to stake some kind of ownership claim in the physical dish, you would have people trying to sue them every time some poorly installed one fell on some
 
2013-06-14 07:46:50 AM  

firesign: The dish, huh? I couldn't *get* them to take that farking thing back when I cancelled my service. I ended up tossing it on a junk heap.


You were probably off contract. He probably signed up for a 2 year deal or whatever that gave him a free dish and receivers. Just like if the guy further up the threads father's phone was off contract, he could just say, "cancel the service"
 
2013-06-14 07:47:11 AM  
What, are we reviewing first drafts of stories submitted to the consumerist now?
 
2013-06-14 07:49:07 AM  

Securitywyrm: Exactly. Yeah it sucks that something bad happened to you, but you rented the dish from them. That's how it works.


But when you move, DirecTV tells you to just leave the dish behind and they send you another one.
 
2013-06-14 07:50:15 AM  

cretinbob: That's what homeowners insurance is for


Hell, he probably doesn't even need to pay NOW.

Spend your money on the diapers and whatnot. In a few months when your insurance check comes it, makes sure to pay DirecTV for the dish they gave/sold you.
 
2013-06-14 07:50:54 AM  

rufus-t-firefly: Securitywyrm: Exactly. Yeah it sucks that something bad happened to you, but you rented the dish from them. That's how it works.

But when you move, DirecTV tells you to just leave the dish behind and they send you another one.


It's been mentioned, but since it's not sinking in:

They told him he would owe $400 for a satellite dish and two receivers destroyed in the blaze.
 
2013-06-14 07:52:09 AM  

rufus-t-firefly: Securitywyrm: Exactly. Yeah it sucks that something bad happened to you, but you rented the dish from them. That's how it works.

But when you move, DirecTV tells you to just leave the dish behind and they send you another one.


Because now there is a slight added incentive to the dude who moves in after you to go, "hey, maybe I'll get direct TV", and they won't need to send him a dish. Can't really do that with a melted dish. They also tell you to bring your boxes with you, which I imagine is what most of this charge is for.
 
2013-06-14 07:52:48 AM  

rufus-t-firefly: Securitywyrm: Exactly. Yeah it sucks that something bad happened to you, but you rented the dish from them. That's how it works.

But when you move, DirecTV tells you to just leave the dish behind and they send you another one.


This is also in their best interest.  If you were the person moving in and you saw that there was already a system in place, would you call them to get it going again or would you go through the hassle of getting a different provider?  Results may vary, but it's a better chance of getting the business than removing it.
 
2013-06-14 07:54:29 AM  

cretinbob: That's what homeowners insurance is for


And what insurance adjusters are for. "Dear Directv, minus depreciation, your dish is worth $10.95. Here is your check."
 
2013-06-14 07:54:49 AM  

NickelP: firesign: The dish, huh? I couldn't *get* them to take that farking thing back when I cancelled my service. I ended up tossing it on a junk heap.

The dish and 2 receivers....


Yeah, I missed that. I blame subby for making me have to actually RTFA to get the real info.

/Welcome to fark, etc.
 
2013-06-14 07:57:38 AM  

badhatharry: cretinbob: That's what homeowners insurance is for

And what insurance adjusters are for. "Dear Directv, minus depreciation, your dish is worth $10.95. Here is your check."


if you have a decent policy, it will account for the fact that the item was under contract, and what its real value to you is.
 
2013-06-14 07:59:02 AM  
I can see Directv quibbling about the DVRs, but the dishes are disposable.  They even advertise that you leave them behind when you move.

When I signed back up last Summer they offered coverage on the equipment.  Think I took it.
 
2013-06-14 08:00:06 AM  
Slightly off-topic, but doesn't it seem like most of the personal satellite dishes are attached to mobile homes and cheap apartments? Maybe it's just me. I rarely see the things in newer developments but when I drive through town some of the older houses chopped up in to Section 8 apartments have so many dishes it looks like a branch office for SETI.
 
2013-06-14 08:01:57 AM  
DirecTV could've been a bit more tactful about that. The guy was obviously emotional as hell. He just lost his farking HOUSE! But I agree he owes the money, and the homeowner's insurance should cover it

/I know, tact is a 4 letter word.
 
2013-06-14 08:02:05 AM  

LineNoise: NickelP: Hi its the semi-annual directv/comcast whoever wouldn't give me free shiat just because something bad happened to me and I'm too lazy to add it to the insurance claim article!

In all seriousness though I don't know why DirecTV doesn't insure these things theirselves just to avoid the bad PR.  The cost of doing that has to be negligible.

Its a headache. If they tried to stake some kind of ownership claim in the physical dish, you would have people trying to sue them every time some poorly installed one fell on some


I was thinking more the receivers.  The dish probably cost them around $10 or less to make, I doubt anyone gives two shiats about that.  They already offer optional insurance on the equipment that this guy apparently declined.  A blanket policy covering all directv customers for loss of equipment that had a clause allowing them to seek reimbursement from any primary insurance provider (if one exists) in the case of natural disaster seems pretty doable.

I'm sure its more complicated than this, but it could work like when you get in a car accident and use your health insurance.  They bill it back to the car insurance company that is responsible.  If none exists then they have to deal with it.

DirecTV should be big enough to have enough claims that they could stream line this type of thing pretty easy and in the cases of hurricanes etc batch the claims together.  Then when a customer calls over something like this all they need to do is say 'who is your home insurance/renters insurance company' if they say no one then directv writes it off.  Honestly if there is no insurance I can't imagine DirecTV gets paid very often anyways.  Maybe for a renter or some very wealthy individuals but a large fire without insurance is going to wipe out a lot of people.
 
2013-06-14 08:03:47 AM  

LineNoise: badhatharry: cretinbob: That's what homeowners insurance is for

And what insurance adjusters are for. "Dear Directv, minus depreciation, your dish is worth $10.95. Here is your check."

if you have a decent policy, it will account for the fact that the item was under contract, and what its real value to you is.


Most policies will pay what it will cost to replace two used receivers and a dish. It depends on how new the equipment was.
 
2013-06-14 08:04:46 AM  

Mr. Coffee Nerves: Slightly off-topic, but doesn't it seem like most of the personal satellite dishes are attached to mobile homes and cheap apartments? Maybe it's just me. I rarely see the things in newer developments but when I drive through town some of the older houses chopped up in to Section 8 apartments have so many dishes it looks like a branch office for SETI.


People with money get cable and such.

Grabbing moving pictures from the airwaves...how primitive.
 
2013-06-14 08:04:52 AM  

Mr. Coffee Nerves: Slightly off-topic, but doesn't it seem like most of the personal satellite dishes are attached to mobile homes and cheap apartments? Maybe it's just me. I rarely see the things in newer developments but when I drive through town some of the older houses chopped up in to Section 8 apartments have so many dishes it looks like a branch office for SETI.


Its a few things. People get behind on their cable, so switch to direct tv. They then get behind on that, and switch to dish, they then get behind that and switch to something else.

also, until recently, you got far more international channels on sat then you did on cable. My cable company now offers packages with a crapton of spanish, etc channels, so that may not be as big of a driver anymore.

Also someone in a decent place is probably going to put a little thought into where they stick their dish for aesthetics if they do have sat, as opossed to a guy living in a trailer who is just going to stick it wherever it is easiest. I originally wanted to get it in my place, but the only place I had LOS was right off my terrace, and I didn't want to stare at that thing every time I sat outside.
 
2013-06-14 08:05:04 AM  
Ya they don't care about the dish. It is the receivers they want the $ for.

Directv can be a customer service hell like no other, but in this case they seem to be in the right about those receivers.

Sucks for them having a fire but as mentioned that is why you carry INS
 
2013-06-14 08:05:13 AM  
How much was the early termination fee?
 
2013-06-14 08:07:06 AM  
He's still responsible for it but his home owners insurance will cover it.
 
2013-06-14 08:09:11 AM  

Mr. Coffee Nerves: Slightly off-topic, but doesn't it seem like most of the personal satellite dishes are attached to mobile homes and cheap apartments? Maybe it's just me. I rarely see the things in newer developments but when I drive through town some of the older houses chopped up in to Section 8 apartments have so many dishes it looks like a branch office for SETI.


nicer apartments tend to do things like charge decently large deposits on them (you can't legally not allow them).  shiat holes ones don't give a fark.

Also they can't not allow them legally, but tons of HOA's restrict them anyways and just back down if they get sued.  Most people don't care enough to fight it.
 
2013-06-14 08:10:43 AM  

NickelP: LineNoise: NickelP: Hi its the semi-annual directv/comcast whoever wouldn't give me free shiat just because something bad happened to me and I'm too lazy to add it to the insurance claim article!

In all seriousness though I don't know why DirecTV doesn't insure these things theirselves just to avoid the bad PR.  The cost of doing that has to be negligible.

Its a headache. If they tried to stake some kind of ownership claim in the physical dish, you would have people trying to sue them every time some poorly installed one fell on some

I was thinking more the receivers.  The dish probably cost them around $10 or less to make, I doubt anyone gives two shiats about that.  They already offer optional insurance on the equipment that this guy apparently declined.  A blanket policy covering all directv customers for loss of equipment that had a clause allowing them to seek reimbursement from any primary insurance provider (if one exists) in the case of natural disaster seems pretty doable.

I'm sure its more complicated than this, but it could work like when you get in a car accident and use your health insurance.  They bill it back to the car insurance company that is responsible.  If none exists then they have to deal with it.

DirecTV should be big enough to have enough claims that they could stream line this type of thing pretty easy and in the cases of hurricanes etc batch the claims together.  Then when a customer calls over something like this all they need to do is say 'who is your home insurance/renters insurance company' if they say no one then directv writes it off.  Honestly if there is no insurance I can't imagine DirecTV gets paid very often anyways.  Maybe for a renter or some very wealthy individuals but a large fire without insurance is going to wipe out a lot of people.


Certainly it is doable, and I'm sure direct tv has people who can crunch the numbers far better than we could that have done so, and have determined that this is just easier, and anyone with common sense will understand why they billed this dumbass when you get the sob story every now and then. Ultimately it is just less legwork for them, and I doubt they would even pursue it any further than telling the guy he can't have service again until he squares up, and maybe throw a ding on his credit report that he violated his contract. They aren't exactly going to start putting liens on him or anything over a couple hundred bucks.

Like I said, if they did self insure these things, it opens up other questions, not to mention the fact that they now have to play detective on everyone who wants out of their contract or the latest model receiver. "yea, a pipe broke, and amazingly the only thing that got flooded was my receiver. Please send me a new one"

As everyone pointed out above, the dish itself isn't the real cost here, it is the 2 receivers. I know when I got cable i signed something saying I was responsible for my boxes, and would be billed a few hundred bucks for any that didn't get returned when I ended my service.
 
2013-06-14 08:10:54 AM  

Mr. Coffee Nerves: Slightly off-topic, but doesn't it seem like most of the personal satellite dishes are attached to mobile homes and cheap apartments? Maybe it's just me. I rarely see the things in newer developments but when I drive through town some of the older houses chopped up in to Section 8 apartments have so many dishes it looks like a branch office for SETI.


Directv picture quality was much much better than the cable company I switched to.

Directv became so expensive and they would rather lose a longtime customer than offer the same intro or special pricing for new folks so I dumped them

Signed up for cable with almost same channels and added a 50Mbps Internet connection and it was still cheaper than directv
 
2013-06-14 08:11:21 AM  
He was renting those receivers.  They belonged to DirecTV.  If he'd had an Avis rental car in the garage, would he be pitching a fit because Avis wanted him to pay for the car he wasn't returning?
 
2013-06-14 08:11:32 AM  

Mr. Coffee Nerves: mobile homes and cheap apartments


Could it be that  mobile homes and cheap apartments are far more common than houses?
 
2013-06-14 08:11:33 AM  

cretinbob: That's what homeowners insurance is for

 
2013-06-14 08:12:05 AM  
Tag is for home owner right?
 
2013-06-14 08:12:52 AM  
Don't forget the value added, termination and convenience fees!  Is the company at fault?  No.  Is corporate America a sh*thouse?  Yeah.
 
2013-06-14 08:13:18 AM  

NickelP: Mr. Coffee Nerves: Slightly off-topic, but doesn't it seem like most of the personal satellite dishes are attached to mobile homes and cheap apartments? Maybe it's just me. I rarely see the things in newer developments but when I drive through town some of the older houses chopped up in to Section 8 apartments have so many dishes it looks like a branch office for SETI.

nicer apartments tend to do things like charge decently large deposits on them (you can't legally not allow them).  shiat holes ones don't give a fark.

Also they can't not allow them legally, but tons of HOA's restrict them anyways and just back down if they get sued.  Most people don't care enough to fight it.


Yea the rule here is they have to allow them, but can restrict them to only be attached to something that is part of your lease, and you must remove them when you leave, and repair whatever you mounted them to, which really limits where you can stick one.
 
2013-06-14 08:14:16 AM  

NickelP: Mr. Coffee Nerves: Slightly off-topic, but doesn't it seem like most of the personal satellite dishes are attached to mobile homes and cheap apartments? Maybe it's just me. I rarely see the things in newer developments but when I drive through town some of the older houses chopped up in to Section 8 apartments have so many dishes it looks like a branch office for SETI.

nicer apartments tend to do things like charge decently large deposits on them (you can't legally not allow them).  shiat holes ones don't give a fark.

Also they can't not allow them legally, but tons of HOA's restrict them anyways and just back down if they get sued.  Most people don't care enough to fight it.


Also at least for the apartments, they can say you can't run internal wiring so your ass gets stuck with those flat little cable strung through a sliding glass door and running along baseboards everywhere.
 
2013-06-14 08:14:32 AM  
Insurance.  Have it, use it.

What a big dummy.
 
2013-06-14 08:15:33 AM  

MooseUpNorth: He should. At least in Canada, banks tend to require insurance (with the bank as beneficiary) as a condition for granting that mortgage. House burns down, insurance pays off the mortgage, everybody walks away.


That's not exactly forgiving the mortgage.  They're getting their money.  As stated many times before upthread - that's what insurance is for.

Even after personal tragedy, life goes on, and books have to balance.  I'll say it again - that's precisely what insurance is for.
 
2013-06-14 08:15:34 AM  

kindms: Directv became so expensive and they would rather lose a longtime customer than offer the same intro or special pricing for new folks so I dumped them


Yeah... Unfortunately that was the networks putting the screws to them, rather than a voluntary decision.

/My favorite has been Fios... although im stuck with comcast atm.
 
2013-06-14 08:15:43 AM  

Koodz: At least they let him cancel.  I remember Verizon charging me $200 to cancel my father's cell phone even after I brought them a copy of the death certificate.


I'm guessing there is more to this story.. Was the account wasn't in his name was it?
 
2013-06-14 08:17:31 AM  

Babwa Wawa: MooseUpNorth: He should. At least in Canada, banks tend to require insurance (with the bank as beneficiary) as a condition for granting that mortgage. House burns down, insurance pays off the mortgage, everybody walks away.

That's not exactly forgiving the mortgage.  They're getting their money.  As stated many times before upthread - that's what insurance is for.

Even after personal tragedy, life goes on, and books have to balance.  I'll say it again - that's precisely what insurance is for.


And a basic renters insurance policy is insanely cheap. Most decent places require you to carry one as well.
 
2013-06-14 08:17:41 AM  

Dracolich: rufus-t-firefly: Securitywyrm: Exactly. Yeah it sucks that something bad happened to you, but you rented the dish from them. That's how it works.

But when you move, DirecTV tells you to just leave the dish behind and they send you another one.

This is also in their best interest.  If you were the person moving in and you saw that there was already a system in place, would you call them to get it going again or would you go through the hassle of getting a different provider?  Results may vary, but it's a better chance of getting the business than removing it.


The dish the previous owner left in our yard works great as a toy for the kids. We called to ask about removing it when we moved in, since we have fios, and they tried their hardest to get us to buy the service, but we said nope, and they just told us to leave it. It makes a nice decoration in the back of the yard.
 
2013-06-14 08:19:12 AM  

LineNoise: One of these threads again?

Yes, your insurance, (homeowners or renters, you are responsible and spend the like 75 bucks a year for renters insurance, right?) will take care of it, which is why direct tv will bill you. If they did not, anyone who wanted to get out of any contract ever could just make up some sob story, and companies would then have to play detective on everything.

Koodz: At least they let him cancel.  I remember Verizon charging me $200 to cancel my father's cell phone even after I brought them a copy of the death certificate.

Why shouldn't they? They are no different than any other creditor, be it a credit card, a mortgage, whatever, that the estate is OBLIGATED to pay out. Had your father died destitute, or had mr burnt dish mcdish been destitute, there are procedures in place to essentially say, "hey, we got nothing left to pay you with" to disolve the debt.

Lets say your dad owed 100k on his mortgage. Should the bank just say, "wow, sucks he is dead, we will forget about the 100k he owed us, enjoy the house!"


Lol, do you seriously no know the difference between secured and unsecured debt?
 
2013-06-14 08:19:23 AM  

cretinbob: That's what homeowners insurance is for


This. Most homeowners insurance covers the contents of the house up to a certain amount (and if they don't, they should.) Just say, "talk to my insurance company."
 
2013-06-14 08:19:53 AM  

tbhouston: Koodz: At least they let him cancel.  I remember Verizon charging me $200 to cancel my father's cell phone even after I brought them a copy of the death certificate.

I'm guessing there is more to this story.. Was the account wasn't in his name was it?


No that is standard. They are just making sure they get in line with every other creditor. They assumed that he would live through his contract, and thus subsidized his phone for him. They are due their money just like visa, whoever you financed your car from, etc. Granted your cell phone company is going to be way at the end of the line, but they want to make sure they at least get in line.

Had his father died broke, he would not have been responsible for it.
 
2013-06-14 08:19:54 AM  

Waldo Pepper: If for some reason this guy has no fire insurance I can understand him making a fuss.


Why the hell should him having insurance make a damned bit of difference?
 
2013-06-14 08:19:59 AM  

cheap_thoughts: Koodz: At least they let him cancel.  I remember Verizon charging me $200 to cancel my father's cell phone even after I brought them a copy of the death certificate.

You're not responsible for your parents debt.


Yes he is if he is inheriting his parents' estate. If his dad has $100 in his bank when he dies, but owes $75 to Verizon, his inheritance is $25.  Have fun with your inheritance.
 
2013-06-14 08:20:27 AM  

ajgeek: DirecTV could've been a bit more tactful about that. The guy was obviously emotional as hell. He just lost his farking HOUSE! But I agree he owes the money, and the homeowner's insurance should cover it

/I know, tact is a 4 letter word.


Part of the issue here is that Comcast, Centurylink and the libraries all told homeowners not to worry about books or equipment destroyed in the fire. I think even the trash companies are just writing off the big waste containers -- if yours blows away or you hit it with your car or something they usually charge you for it.

DirecTV has insurance too. And writing off some destroyed equipment has got to be easier than trying to collect it from displaced homeowners, not to mention the bad PR.
 
2013-06-14 08:20:57 AM  

Parkanzky: He was renting those receivers.  They belonged to DirecTV.  If he'd had an Avis rental car in the garage, would he be pitching a fit because Avis wanted him to pay for the car he wasn't returning?


Right, but as Badhatharry brought up, they've been depreciating all of their rental equipment.  This puts the residual value much lower than starting price especially if they used an accelerated depreciation method.  If they charge you more than the residual on this, they can't turn a profit on the amount that goes over the residual due to depreciation recapture.  I'm not an accountant, so I may be a little off; but to me it looks like any amount that the guy is asked to pay over the residual goes straight to the gov't.
 
2013-06-14 08:21:08 AM  

tbhouston: Koodz: At least they let him cancel.  I remember Verizon charging me $200 to cancel my father's cell phone even after I brought them a copy of the death certificate.

I'm guessing there is more to this story.. Was the account wasn't in his name was it?


When somebody dies, their estate still owes the money for any outstanding debts or contracts.  Creditors get first dibs at any inheritance.  Its up to the person managing the estate to get the funds from the deceased's account to where it belongs.  So essentially, its up to the child to pay the bill  using money from the inheritance.

If no inheritance exists or was exhausted by other creditors, then the person owed the debt is shiat out of luck.  Usually there is  something though, whether its life insurance or whatever.
 
2013-06-14 08:22:51 AM  
Fark DirecTV. Not because of this... just Fark 'em for cheap sign up rates which disappear in a couple months. I will say this, it's no wonder some of you are so content living under a corporate-controlled plutocracy. I'm curious, does it hurt less when your having a dick shoved up your ass if you suck it first and get it all wet?
 
2013-06-14 08:23:05 AM  

jelloslug: Lol, do you seriously no know the difference between secured and unsecured debt?


Yes, do you? Just because something is unsecured like a credit card or a phone contract, which is not tied to a physical object which the lender takes an ownership claim in as part of the loan, like a mortgage, does not mean the debt vanishes upon death. It just means the creditor does not have a physical object to say, "wait, that is ours, and should not be considered as part of the estate until we are made whole".
 
2013-06-14 08:24:07 AM  

Dracolich: Right, but as Badhatharry brought up, they've been depreciating all of their rental equipment.  This puts the residual value much lower than starting price especially if they used an accelerated depreciation method.  If they charge you more than the residual on this, they can't turn a profit on the amount that goes over the residual due to depreciation recapture.  I'm not an accountant, so I may be a little off; but to me it looks like any amount that the guy is asked to pay over the residual goes straight to the gov't.


When you are responsible for an items destruction, civil law generally dictates you pay the replacement cost.
 
2013-06-14 08:24:32 AM  
The only reason I call shenanigans: there were 3 DirectTv dishes attached to my roof when my wife andi bought our house, farking 3. I have no idea why 3 would be needed, but they were there.
 
2013-06-14 08:25:02 AM  
Watching TV makes you stupid. This guy seems to have watched a whole LOT of it.
 
2013-06-14 08:25:26 AM  

Sensei Can You See: ajgeek: DirecTV could've been a bit more tactful about that. The guy was obviously emotional as hell. He just lost his farking HOUSE! But I agree he owes the money, and the homeowner's insurance should cover it

/I know, tact is a 4 letter word.

Part of the issue here is that Comcast, Centurylink and the libraries all told homeowners not to worry about books or equipment destroyed in the fire. I think even the trash companies are just writing off the big waste containers -- if yours blows away or you hit it with your car or something they usually charge you for it.

DirecTV has insurance too. And writing off some destroyed equipment has got to be easier than trying to collect it from displaced homeowners, not to mention the bad PR.


I'm sure they know they won't collect a lot of it (the bean counters surely considered this as LN noted above).  From the ones that truelly don't have insurance they will stick it on their credit report, some will want to get a loan for something some day and say 'damn, maybe its worth paying that few hundred so it marks as paid and I can improve my score a bit'.  Others will get sold to a collection agency for .20 cents on the dollar and DTV gets something when they would of gotten nothing.  They also probably get a shiat ton paid when people go through the trouble of adding it to their primary insurance claim vs just saying 'oh fark it I have a ton of stuff going on I don't want to deal with DTV if they are willing to waive it'.
 
2013-06-14 08:25:47 AM  
who green lit this?

/lame
 
2013-06-14 08:26:43 AM  

TimonC346: The only reason I call shenanigans: there were 3 DirectTv dishes attached to my roof when my wife andi bought our house, farking 3. I have no idea why 3 would be needed, but they were there.


The old school dishes could only support 1 or 2 outputs. So if you wanted it in 5 rooms, and wanted a dvr in 2 of them that could record 2 shows at once, you had to toss up more dishes. I think they have worked out ways around this these days and it is less of a concern, but there is still some upper limit as to the number of individual streams you can pull off one dish.
 
2013-06-14 08:27:09 AM  

Dahnkster: Fark DirecTV. Not because of this... just Fark 'em for cheap sign up rates which disappear in a couple months. I will say this, it's no wonder some of you are so content living under a corporate-controlled plutocracy. I'm curious, does it hurt less when your having a dick shoved up your ass if you suck it first and get it all wet?


Push the coffee cup away.
 
2013-06-14 08:28:07 AM  
FTA, other utilities and even Comcast absorbed the loss of equipment from the fires.  Did anyone catch that?   Comcast told them not to worry about the lost equipment.  That just goes to show how awful DirecTV is.

Its not hard for the company to investigate.

Look up address
Turn the news on
Has it been burned to the ground by wildfire?

Pretty easy.  While they may be right, its another lesson in bad PR.
 
2013-06-14 08:30:04 AM  
Too bad he wasn't a huge bank. Then everything would be comped.
 
2013-06-14 08:30:13 AM  
Reading the article, DTV asked him to speak with his insurance company.  He evades the reporter's question about that with more complaining.  So my guess is:

1.  He doesn't have insurance.

2.  He does and makes a claim for the receivers and dish but wants to keep the money.
 
2013-06-14 08:30:44 AM  

rgGolf4: FTA, other utilities and even Comcast absorbed the loss of equipment from the fires.  Did anyone catch that?   Comcast told them not to worry about the lost equipment.  That just goes to show how awful DirecTV is.

Its not hard for the company to investigate.

Look up address
Turn the news on
Has it been burned to the ground by wildfire?

Pretty easy.  While they may be right, its another lesson in bad PR.


I find it hard to believe that comcast is going to walk away from what, for most people, would be an easy line item on their insurance claim.

Your electric company, gas company, etc doesn't really have anything on your property that you technically own and are responsible for.
 
d23 [TotalFark]
2013-06-14 08:31:36 AM  
wow.  Every time we have a thread like this we see how degraded the U.S. has become.

Corporation Uber Alles!!
 
2013-06-14 08:32:55 AM  

jelloslug: LineNoise: One of these threads again?

Yes, your insurance, (homeowners or renters, you are responsible and spend the like 75 bucks a year for renters insurance, right?) will take care of it, which is why direct tv will bill you. If they did not, anyone who wanted to get out of any contract ever could just make up some sob story, and companies would then have to play detective on everything.

Koodz: At least they let him cancel.  I remember Verizon charging me $200 to cancel my father's cell phone even after I brought them a copy of the death certificate.

Why shouldn't they? They are no different than any other creditor, be it a credit card, a mortgage, whatever, that the estate is OBLIGATED to pay out. Had your father died destitute, or had mr burnt dish mcdish been destitute, there are procedures in place to essentially say, "hey, we got nothing left to pay you with" to disolve the debt.

Lets say your dad owed 100k on his mortgage. Should the bank just say, "wow, sucks he is dead, we will forget about the 100k he owed us, enjoy the house!"

Lol, do you seriously no know the difference between secured and unsecured debt?


It's called getting a judgement and Verizon will do it. You don't grow a global company by forgiving debt for something everyone will have to endure one day.  I just bought apiece of property that was in a trust in a family. The closing took 6 months because a deceased brother had an unpaid credit card judgement against him for $6k before he died. When he died, the court transferred the judgement against the estate  and the particular piece of property was part of the estate, Before they could sell the property, the judgement had to be settled.  It went from $6k in 1996 to over $66K in 2012 from compounding interest.
There was no secured loan. It was a contract in which he breached because of non-payment when  before he died and then his estate  still didn't pay.  The executors of the estate still didn't pay it over the years ignoring the letters saying it was ballooning.
I'm not sure you understand unsecured loans. Just because there is no collateral put up for payment of a term contract doesn't mean it is a loan.  Even if it was, it still doens't mean a lender has no choice but to throw his hands in the air and say "aww shucks".
 
2013-06-14 08:33:14 AM  

LineNoise: jelloslug: Lol, do you seriously no know the difference between secured and unsecured debt?

Yes, do you? Just because something is unsecured like a credit card or a phone contract, which is not tied to a physical object which the lender takes an ownership claim in as part of the loan, like a mortgage, does not mean the debt vanishes upon death. It just means the creditor does not have a physical object to say, "wait, that is ours, and should not be considered as part of the estate until we are made whole".


He doesn't understand the difference in recourse and nonrecourse debt.

LineNoise: TimonC346: The only reason I call shenanigans: there were 3 DirectTv dishes attached to my roof when my wife andi bought our house, farking 3. I have no idea why 3 would be needed, but they were there.

The old school dishes could only support 1 or 2 outputs. So if you wanted it in 5 rooms, and wanted a dvr in 2 of them that could record 2 shows at once, you had to toss up more dishes. I think they have worked out ways around this these days and it is less of a concern, but there is still some upper limit as to the number of individual streams you can pull off one dish.


They redesigned the dishes to fix this, but back in the day they ran out of space on one of their satellites and pushed HD off to a new one.  If you had service before then or purchased the old style dish you had to add an extra one and join the signals together or purchase the new style dish (which were actually relatively expensive at the time) to hit both sats.  It wasn't uncommon to have multiple dishes around that time.  At least that is how I remember it, that was probably in the late 90's early 00's.
 
2013-06-14 08:33:59 AM  

d23: wow.  Every time we have a thread like this we see how degraded the U.S. has become.

Corporation Uber Alles!!


2/10
 
2013-06-14 08:36:30 AM  

Mr. Coffee Nerves: Slightly off-topic, but doesn't it seem like most of the personal satellite dishes are attached to mobile homes and cheap apartments? Maybe it's just me. I rarely see the things in newer developments but when I drive through town some of the older houses chopped up in to Section 8 apartments have so many dishes it looks like a branch office for SETI.


I think it's the density of those places that make you notice.  More dishes/sq foot.
 
2013-06-14 08:38:12 AM  
The Muthaship:
Push the coffee cup away.

24.media.tumblr.com
 
2013-06-14 08:40:11 AM  

The Muthaship: rufus-t-firefly: Securitywyrm: Exactly. Yeah it sucks that something bad happened to you, but you rented the dish from them. That's how it works.

But when you move, DirecTV tells you to just leave the dish behind and they send you another one.

It's been mentioned, but since it's not sinking in:

They told him he would owe $400 for a satellite dish and two receivers destroyed in the blaze.


The misleading promo pricing with trial period massive increases keeps me a non-subscriber.

DefecTV cannot get a former customer to pay for a installer to go to a building, remove the dish and fix where the mounting hardware was placed in order to prevent rain from entering the property. It is easier and cheaper to leave the dish in place. The receivers are another matter. Box it up and ship it to the address given and get a receipt. Isn't a mandatory payment for box rental cover loss of equipment or is that just another backdoor rate increase? Just my two pence worth.
 
d23 [TotalFark]
2013-06-14 08:41:13 AM  

Babwa Wawa: d23: wow.  Every time we have a thread like this we see how degraded the U.S. has become.

Corporation Uber Alles!!

2/10


well damn me to hell for thinking that basic humanity and common sense should trump a contract!  Whoo wee!

Contracts must descend from heaven from L. Ron Hubbard on titanium plates.  Unless the Corporation reneges, of course, and that's AOK.  It's business... nothing personal.

Let me grade myself: 1/10.
 
2013-06-14 08:42:32 AM  
What exactly am I supposed to be upset about here?
 
2013-06-14 08:42:33 AM  
Directv sucks. He should get Dish network.
 
2013-06-14 08:42:53 AM  

Babwa Wawa: Mr. Coffee Nerves: Slightly off-topic, but doesn't it seem like most of the personal satellite dishes are attached to mobile homes and cheap apartments? Maybe it's just me. I rarely see the things in newer developments but when I drive through town some of the older houses chopped up in to Section 8 apartments have so many dishes it looks like a branch office for SETI.

I think it's the density of those places that make you notice.  More dishes/sq foot.


Newer developments typically attract the underground cable providers such as AT&T, TimeWarner, etc at the time of construction and coordinated with power companies, gas, etc.  We build neighborhoods and there are two types of utility contractors required.  Water and sewer (Wet) and dry utilities (Electric, gas, communications).  Mobile home parks and single mobile homes typically don't have gas, either and the power is overhead almost 100% of the time.  This is the cheapest way to do it. Cable providers don't have the incentive to permanently install the lines to sparsely populated areas for customers who are so financially insecure they can't afford to pay for a house that doesn't have tires holding down the roof.
 
2013-06-14 08:43:59 AM  

Alonjar: tbhouston: Koodz: At least they let him cancel.  I remember Verizon charging me $200 to cancel my father's cell phone even after I brought them a copy of the death certificate.

I'm guessing there is more to this story.. Was the account wasn't in his name was it?

When somebody dies, their estate still owes the money for any outstanding debts or contracts.  Creditors get first dibs at any inheritance.  Its up to the person managing the estate to get the funds from the deceased's account to where it belongs.  So essentially, its up to the child to pay the bill  using money from the inheritance.

If no inheritance exists or was exhausted by other creditors, then the person owed the debt is shiat out of luck.  Usually there is  something though, whether its life insurance or whatever.


They can't touch the life insurance.  I just went through this with my wife's father's passing.  The estate is essentially the bank accounts, the house or any other asset.
 
2013-06-14 08:47:52 AM  
This is not the first time locals hit by wildfires have found DirectTV less than sympathetic. During the Waldo Canyon fire in June 2012, when 347 homes in Mountain Shadows were destroyed, DirectTV also charged customers.

Beach said DirectTV told him to get his insurance to pay.


If you live in an area where there are potential wildfires do you have to pay extra insurance for specific wildfire coverage? Like the people in New Jersey who had storm coverage but not surge damage and all the insurance companies said "Surge Damage! You no get nuttin'"
 
2013-06-14 08:49:04 AM  

TimonC346: The only reason I call shenanigans: there were 3 DirectTv dishes attached to my roof when my wife andi bought our house, farking 3. I have no idea why 3 would be needed, but they were there.


If it's anything like DISH, they have more than one orbit where their satellites are.  To get channels offered by both satellite constellations, you need multiple dishes.  For DISH, the majority of the channels were in one direction, but for my local HD channels a dish had to be pointed in a different direction.

So, I had two dishes.  I would imagine the same holds true for DirectTV
 
2013-06-14 08:50:11 AM  
I pay Dish $7 a month for equipment insurance.

Don't say it's a waste of money, because our house got hit by lightning 2 weeks ago and fried the receiver.

Dish sent it out by fedex 2 day delivery, with a return label for the fried one. No muss, no fuss.

/once you're off contract, cancel the insurance and tell them to pound sand if they want to charge you for a new one, that if they don't send you a new one free, you'll just get one from directtv.
 
2013-06-14 08:50:20 AM  
I just looked up some used dvr receivers on ebay. $400 for two of them seems about right.
 
2013-06-14 08:50:26 AM  
d23


Stop making sense. You'd better get with the program citizen. Bow down before your corporate betters.   DirecTV is your friend. How do you ever expect the poors to learn personal responsibility and boot-strappiness? After all, fires are an act of God.
 
2013-06-14 08:51:08 AM  

rgGolf4: FTA, other utilities and even Comcast absorbed the loss of equipment from the fires.  Did anyone catch that?   Comcast told them not to worry about the lost equipment.  That just goes to show how awful DirecTV is.

Its not hard for the company to investigate.

Look up address
Turn the news on
Has it been burned to the ground by wildfire?

Pretty easy.  While they may be right, its another lesson in bad PR.


Comcast was great when sandy destroyed all our stuff. When I dropped off the remotes that were dry they smiled and told me don't worry about the rest, and that they hoped we would be able to go home soon. I was happily surprised. I expected a bill for the equipment.
 
2013-06-14 08:53:11 AM  

Babwa Wawa: Mr. Coffee Nerves: Slightly off-topic, but doesn't it seem like most of the personal satellite dishes are attached to mobile homes and cheap apartments? Maybe it's just me. I rarely see the things in newer developments but when I drive through town some of the older houses chopped up in to Section 8 apartments have so many dishes it looks like a branch office for SETI.

I think it's the density of those places that make you notice.  More dishes/sq foot.


People that live in nicer places tend to make better decisions too, in general.  A nice apartment dweller is far more likely to go visit their management office before installing a dish.  When they get told that they have to put a $500 deposit down, do the wiring stuff I mentioned, and confine it to their patio (which has no guarantee of even being able to get reception) or they dcould ya know just call the cable company and be done, they usually just call the cable company.  In the event that they just do whatever the fark they want and install it anyways, those types of tenants are much more capable of paying damages so the landlords will go after them and threaten/evict over violating the lease.

When you are dealing with tenants paying damn near nothing to live in some shiathole, they tend to do stupid stuff like just stick it up and worry about it later, or showup one day with 5 pit bulls.  The landlord in this case is a little more farked.  If damage has occurred it already has.  He can now issue a lease violation, charge back a deposit, and pursue an eviction if they don't pay it (which most won't or can't).  Now he can refuse rent, file a case with the court, hire an attorney, and lose another few months before it all is settled with the court and he has a new tenant.  Plus at this point the tenant is going to be pissed, trash the place, and waste hours of employee time in dealing with this entire affair.  Then after he gets a judgement he might get lucky to garnish $25 or $50 a month to pay for this thousands of damage. In a lot of places he also has to pay to refile that judgement every so often which may not even cover what he is getting.  It frankly just makes more sense not to go after poor tenants for a lot of shiat that you wouldn't hesitate to enforce against richer ones, and the poorer ones tend to create those types of issues a hell of a lot more often.

If you are renting upscale apartments tenants are pickier too, a lot of them think the dishes look awful and as a owner/manager they won't want their property not looking great.  A shiathole tenant commonly just is looking for some place that will accept his/her application and couldn't care less if it looks like a communication center.
 
DAR [TotalFark]
2013-06-14 08:53:27 AM  
having burned up a couple of Dish Network boxes during a recent house fire, I called them up to report the damage & get the infor to file against the insurance claim (which covered the whole cost of replacement).   They requested I ship the burned out box's shipped back which I did.  They claimed non-receipt on one of them........

Every 2 or 3 years (ish) some database or audit kicks out my name as still having one of the burned out hulks which I've paid them in full year ago and still have all the paperwork to prove it.

I just add the latest letter to the stack, copy it, & add a strongly worded letter, mailed to the company's HQ addressed to the CEO, this shuts up till the next database audit.......k/dar
 
2013-06-14 08:55:43 AM  
This is a little off topic, but I need to vent.
So I lose power due to the latest storm in VA. Lots of huge old trees, so when the wind blows stuff starts coming down and knocking out lines. Power goes out (ours did before the storm even started) and stays out for a while. Last major storm it was 8 days. (luckily my service line is still attached this time) Not to worry, I've got a generator to keep me up in cold Cokes and Xbox, but a limb took out my cable line. So no TV shows. But I've got the last three episodes of Revolution, 2 of Defiance, and a couple MLPs to watch. Wait, what's this? No signal apparently means my Goddamn DVR won't even turn on. It has power, I can hear things humming, but the power button does nothing. I un/replug it, and it goes through the boot process, gets as far as the Cisco screen, and then takes a shiat.

Apparently Comcast has decided, that if you don't have their express "OK" pinging into your machine 24 hours a day, you don't get to use their stuff. Not even to watch shows you *already* recorded. I guess this is so you can't take a DVR full of quality shows over to a friends house and let him get away with seeing something for free? Fark you, Comcast. It's bad enough that it takes 5 Goddamn days for you to fix the cablelines AFTER the power comes back, I would at least like to watch the shows I already have.

/And to think this is the route Xbox 1 is going...
//End rant.
 
2013-06-14 08:58:50 AM  

DAR: having burned up a couple of Dish Network boxes during a recent house fire, I called them up to report the damage & get the infor to file against the insurance claim (which covered the whole cost of replacement).   They requested I ship the burned out box's shipped back which I did.  They claimed non-receipt on one of them........

Every 2 or 3 years (ish) some database or audit kicks out my name as still having one of the burned out hulks which I've paid them in full year ago and still have all the paperwork to prove it.

I just add the latest letter to the stack, copy it, & add a strongly worded letter, mailed to the company's HQ addressed to the CEO, this shuts up till the next database audit.......k/dar


Why did they need them back if they were paid for?
 
2013-06-14 08:59:31 AM  

rgGolf4: FTA, other utilities and even Comcast absorbed the loss of equipment from the fires. Did anyone catch that? Comcast told them not to worry about the lost equipment. That just goes to show how awful DirecTV is.


My thoughts exactly.  DirecTV is getting *slammed* in the PR department by Dish.  Every time a show goes to commercial I see another one ripping them a new one over how bad their rating is with the Better Business Bureau.

Customer service CAN make or break a company.

At one staff development day, we had speakers whose presentations were all about over the top customer service, and how this excellent customer service was 100% correlated to the success of the company.  One example was a car company (not saying which because someone will snark at it), when a guy showed up by mistake to get a part for a different make of car, THEY DROVE THE GUY TO THE OTHER DEALER.

The level of PR they got for that was extremely high.  If DirecTV wants to promote itself this would be a good place to start.  Good customer service is NEVER a bad thing.
 
2013-06-14 09:01:22 AM  

badhatharry: cretinbob: That's what homeowners insurance is for

And what insurance adjusters are for. "Dear Directv, minus depreciation, your dish is worth $10.95. Here is your check."


Dracolich: Right, but as Badhatharry brought up, they've been depreciating all of their rental equipment. This puts the residual value much lower than starting price especially if they used an accelerated depreciation method. If they charge you more than the residual on this, they can't turn a profit on the amount that goes over the residual due to depreciation recapture. I'm not an accountant, so I may be a little off; but to me it looks like any amount that the guy is asked to pay over the residual goes straight to the gov't.


Insurance does not factor in depreciation or market value -- you're given what the replacement cost is. So to replace the DirectTV equipment, new equipment would need to be purchased, and you're given the money needed to do that.
 
2013-06-14 09:02:46 AM  
I HATE directv and I don't even have it.  I moved into a new house, and the previous owner had DirectTV and had their satellite dish mounted in a really terrible place on the roof.  Since I didn't want DirectTV I called and asked whether they would come and get their dish.  They don't (I have to pay someone $150 to come take it down).  So, apparently, they don't  actually give a crap about their dishes, they just want to charge the people they can for them.
 
2013-06-14 09:07:11 AM  
I had Direct TV and I moved.  They told me to leave the dish and pack up the equipment, they would hook everything up at the new place.  When they got to the new place, they couldn't service it because of a contract problem that I knew nothing about.  So, they told me that I had to go back to the old place and remove the dish and the eye or I would have to pay them $1000.  I only left everything there because they said they could service the new place and there would be no charges.  This was not my fault.
The people that had rented the new place had Direct TV hooked up and I couldn't go ripping down their dish.  That is exactly what Direct TV told me to do.
I called he landlord of the rental property and had to get him involved.  It ended up that I had to close my bank account to keep them from removing the money and it took me two years to get it off of my credit.
 
2013-06-14 09:09:20 AM  
i1056.photobucket.com
 
2013-06-14 09:12:46 AM  

GalFriday: I had Direct TV and I moved.  They told me to leave the dish and pack up the equipment, they would hook everything up at the new place.  When they got to the new place, they couldn't service it because of a contract problem that I knew nothing about.  So, they told me that I had to go back to the old place and remove the dish and the eye or I would have to pay them $1000.  I only left everything there because they said they could service the new place and there would be no charges.  This was not my fault.
The people that had rented the new place had Direct TV hooked up and I couldn't go ripping down their dish.  That is exactly what Direct TV told me to do.
I called he landlord of the rental property and had to get him involved.  It ended up that I had to close my bank account to keep them from removing the money and it took me two years to get it off of my credit.


thats bs but i think i would of purchased a $20 dish and sent it to them in order to make that entire problem go away
 
2013-06-14 09:15:30 AM  
I know someone who had Verizon FIOS.  The guy's house burned to the ground and he was charged by Verizon for the destroyed router and other gear they supplied. Always read the contract and see if you'll be held responsible for the cable/net service provider's gear if it gets trashed through no fault of your own, like fire or storm.  If it says you're on the hook during the contract period, no matter what, tell them, "no thanks".  If they reply that they won't hold you responsible if you'll sign up, make sure you get it in writing.
 
2013-06-14 09:16:39 AM  

thornhill: badhatharry: cretinbob: That's what homeowners insurance is for

And what insurance adjusters are for. "Dear Directv, minus depreciation, your dish is worth $10.95. Here is your check."

Dracolich: Right, but as Badhatharry brought up, they've been depreciating all of their rental equipment. This puts the residual value much lower than starting price especially if they used an accelerated depreciation method. If they charge you more than the residual on this, they can't turn a profit on the amount that goes over the residual due to depreciation recapture. I'm not an accountant, so I may be a little off; but to me it looks like any amount that the guy is asked to pay over the residual goes straight to the gov't.

Insurance does not factor in depreciation or market value -- you're given what the replacement cost is. So to replace the DirectTV equipment, new equipment would need to be purchased, and you're given the money needed to do that.


The insurance only owes to replace it with one of a similar condition as the one that was lost, not a new one. Since it will most likely not be replaced, they owe Directv the actual cash value.
 
2013-06-14 09:24:27 AM  
Hmmm.... oh, look at that, I included the value of things like my Dish receiver in my homeowner's insurance when I last reviewed and modified it.

And if $400 is a lot to you, maybe you should have cancelled service for three or four months and banked the savings. Satellite TV isn't exactly cheap.

24.media.tumblr.com
/ And why the fark were there chickens in the house?
 
2013-06-14 09:26:04 AM  
I thought all of these homes in Black Forest were million dollar homes on 3-5 acres of land.  If you can afford a million dollar home, I'd think you have money for diapers and such.

That said, it sounds like Directtv is being jerky considering the circumstances...
 
2013-06-14 09:30:59 AM  
All this sounds crazy to me.  We had DirectTV and later cancelled, had them come back and they set up a new dish, we later cancelled again.  We never paid for the dish or equipment and the dish is still sitting on my property.  Never even got a call about returning anything, and now I am considering scrapping it.  People put satellites dishes to the road all the time around here.

/we got rid of it due to loosing signal all the time during hard weather.
//we took them back only because of the dish improvements which wasn't much better
 
2013-06-14 09:39:13 AM  

Alonjar: Um... Yeah... That's how it works.a contract is a contract and it should be covered by isurance


But only between Ferengi.
 
2013-06-14 09:41:31 AM  

lack of warmth: All this sounds crazy to me. We had DirectTV and later cancelled, had them come back and they set up a new dish, we later cancelled again. We never paid for the dish or equipment and the dish is still sitting on my property. Never even got a call about returning anything, and now I am considering scrapping it. People put satellites dishes to the road all the time around here.


I think it depends on how old the equipment is. If gets to a point where the tech on it is old enough that it's nothing but scrap metal they're more than happy to just let it sit around being your problem instead of coming to clean it up.

Telcos do it all the time with business equipment. Ostensibly they want their stuff back when you cut off of them but 9 times out of 10 by the time you're ready to get rid of them routers, firewalls etc. that you were leasing are close enough to obsolete that they never actually bother to come and collect it. Then you wind up with piles of old, largely useless crap that just sits around forever.

/ the only telco equipment I'll never trash no matter how long it sits is shelf cards b/c those mfers are expensive
 
2013-06-14 09:42:51 AM  

d23: well damn me to hell for thinking that basic humanity and common sense should trump a contract!  Whoo wee!


This guy wants to pocket the insurance money that covers the rented shiat in his house, instead of paying the owners of the aforementioned rented shiat.   You don't have to be a corporate shill to realize that's both fraudulent and wrong.

Dahnkster: Stop making sense. You'd better get with the program citizen. Bow down before your corporate betters.   DirecTV is your friend. How do you ever expect the poors to learn personal responsibility and boot-strappiness? After all, fires are an act of God.


Same goes for you.
 
2013-06-14 09:43:28 AM  

Babwa Wawa: Waldo Pepper: If for some reason this guy has no fire insurance I can understand him making a fuss.

Why the hell should him having insurance make a damned bit of difference?


If he doesn't have insurance it makes sense for him to try and get out of paying for the equipment. Why is that so hard to understand?
 
DAR [TotalFark]
2013-06-14 09:44:54 AM  

5monkeys: Why did they need them back if they were paid for?


no idea, think it just a warehouse audit type of thing........k/dar
 
2013-06-14 09:47:04 AM  
I see everything I came to say has been well covered.
 
2013-06-14 09:48:13 AM  

HindiDiscoMonster: Koodz: At least they let him cancel.  I remember Verizon charging me $200 to cancel my father's cell phone even after I brought them a copy of the death certificate.

You should have told them to bill your father.


My dad passed away years ago and my Mom now has alzheimer's. The propane guy comes and delivers and leaves the bill on the doorknob, as the account is still in my Dad's name my Mom takes the bill writes "He is in Heaven" and sends it back to the company.
 
2013-06-14 09:53:27 AM  

HindiDiscoMonster: NickelP: Babwa Wawa: Mr. Coffee Nerves: Slightly off-topic, but doesn't it seem like most of the personal satellite dishes are attached to mobile homes and cheap apartments? Maybe it's just me. I rarely see the things in newer developments but when I drive through town some of the older houses chopped up in to Section 8 apartments have so many dishes it looks like a branch office for SETI.

I think it's the density of those places that make you notice.  More dishes/sq foot.

People that live in nicer places tend to make better decisions too, in general.  A nice apartment dweller is far more likely to go visit their management office before installing a dish.  When they get told that they have to put a $500 deposit down, do the wiring stuff I mentioned, and confine it to their patio (which has no guarantee of even being able to get reception) or they dcould ya know just call the cable company and be done, they usually just call the cable company.  In the event that they just do whatever the fark they want and install it anyways, those types of tenants are much more capable of paying damages so the landlords will go after them and threaten/evict over violating the lease.

When you are dealing with tenants paying damn near nothing to live in some shiathole, they tend to do stupid stuff like just stick it up and worry about it later, or showup one day with 5 pit bulls.  The landlord in this case is a little more farked.  If damage has occurred it already has.  He can now issue a lease violation, charge back a deposit, and pursue an eviction if they don't pay it (which most won't or can't).  Now he can refuse rent, file a case with the court, hire an attorney, and lose another few months before it all is settled with the court and he has a new tenant.  Plus at this point the tenant is going to be pissed, trash the place, and waste hours of employee time in dealing with this entire affair.  Then after he gets a judgement he might get lucky to garnish $25 or $50 a month to ...


You can't write restrictions to prevent access, that does not mean the same thing as no restrictions COULD prevent access.  If you normally are allowed to place stuff in an area (such as a patio) then you are allowed to place a satellite there.  The landlord can't do something to block reception, but they can impose the same types of restrictions they impose on other items.  For example if they don't normally allow you to place personal items on the roof they can tell you that you are not allowed to place a satellite there.  If the tenant wants satellite they have every opportunity to investigate reception issues before signing a lease.  If they fail to do that it doesn't become the landlords responsibility to ensure reception.  It is really no different than apartments with lots of trees.  The landlord doesn't have to cut them down because they are in the way.

At least that was always my understanding of the law, I'm not going to pretend to be an expert, but that interpretation is consistent with everything I've ever seen from satellite forums and how management companies actually handle the issue.
 
2013-06-14 09:56:39 AM  

SaladMonkey: I HATE directv and I don't even have it.  I moved into a new house, and the previous owner had DirectTV and had their satellite dish mounted in a really terrible place on the roof.  Since I didn't want DirectTV I called and asked whether they would come and get their dish.  They don't (I have to pay someone $150 to come take it down).  So, apparently, they don't  actually give a crap about their dishes, they just want to charge the people they can for them.


I wonder if you could send them a demand letter to get their farking crap off your property in 10 days or pay daily storage fees.
 
2013-06-14 10:08:40 AM  

badhatharry: thornhill: badhatharry: cretinbob: That's what homeowners insurance is for

And what insurance adjusters are for. "Dear Directv, minus depreciation, your dish is worth $10.95. Here is your check."

Dracolich: Right, but as Badhatharry brought up, they've been depreciating all of their rental equipment. This puts the residual value much lower than starting price especially if they used an accelerated depreciation method. If they charge you more than the residual on this, they can't turn a profit on the amount that goes over the residual due to depreciation recapture. I'm not an accountant, so I may be a little off; but to me it looks like any amount that the guy is asked to pay over the residual goes straight to the gov't.

Insurance does not factor in depreciation or market value -- you're given what the replacement cost is. So to replace the DirectTV equipment, new equipment would need to be purchased, and you're given the money needed to do that.

The insurance only owes to replace it with one of a similar condition as the one that was lost, not a new one. Since it will most likely not be replaced, they owe Directv the actual cash value.


You're confusing "replacement value" and "actual value."

This is how replacement value works: the insurance company looks at what it would cost to replace that item. If the DirectTV equipment cost $400 to purchase in 2007, for example, but today comprable equipment can be purchased for $300, then you get only $300. But you only get that money when you replace the item.

Actual value does factor in depreciation, but that rate is negotiable (or rather, something you can argue to get reduced). The insurance company will try to apply a blanket depreciation rate to all of your property, but clearly not everything depreciates at the same rate, and some things do not depreciate at all, such as art and certain types of furniture.

Bottom line is that you need to check your insurance policy and be ready to argue with the company.
 
2013-06-14 10:20:13 AM  

MooseUpNorth: abhorrent1: Does he expect the bank to forgive his mortgage too?

He should. At least in Canada, banks tend to require insurance (with the bank as beneficiary) as a condition for granting that mortgage. House burns down, insurance pays off the mortgage, everybody walks away.


Umm...this. Not only did I have to carry the standard home owners insurance, but where I live I have to carry flood insurance. I was shocked when the FEMA maps came back with my neighborhood in the highest of high risk areas, we are at least 5-10 miles from the nearest river. Because my street is 1 foot lower then the street one block over it gets classified in the highest flood risk while the street one block over gets classified in a much lower catagory. Difference in insurance $600 a year.
 
2013-06-14 10:21:03 AM  

Babwa Wawa: This guy wants to pocket the insurance money that covers the rented shiat in his house, instead of paying the owners of the aforementioned rented shiat. You don't have to be a corporate shill to realize that's both fraudulent and wrong.


Where in the article does it say the guy has insurance? We don't know if he was renting the home or was an owner as far as I can tell. But you sure seem hellbent on tongue-punching DirecTV's fart box.  Good for you. Next time you should get some long pants when your mom buys you a suit. You're a big boy now. Yes you are. Who's a big boy? You're a big boy.
 
2013-06-14 10:36:19 AM  
So let's see, with this "logic", my brand new Corvette was also destroyed.  Yeah, I only made one payment, but you still expect me to pay for the car??
 
2013-06-14 11:14:02 AM  

Mr. Coffee Nerves: Slightly off-topic, but doesn't it seem like most of the personal satellite dishes are attached to mobile homes and cheap apartments? Maybe it's just me. I rarely see the things in newer developments but when I drive through town some of the older houses chopped up in to Section 8 apartments have so many dishes it looks like a branch office for SETI.


No, I see dishes all over the place, but many homeowners are better at hiding them than what an apartment or mobile home dweller can do.
 
2013-06-14 11:16:47 AM  
Also, newer neighborhoods may have deed restrictions barring or forcing the dish to be hidden.  Dishes may also be more prevalent in areas that the cable companies don't offer service or updated service.
 
2013-06-14 11:21:09 AM  

Dahnkster: Where in the article does it say the guy has insurance? We don't know if he was renting the home or was an owner as far as I can tell. But you sure seem hellbent on tongue-punching DirecTV's fart box.  Good for you. Next time you should get some long pants when your mom buys you a suit. You're a big boy now. Yes you are. Who's a big boy? You're a big boy.


And since when does a lack of insurance forgive people of their debts?  Renter's insurance is like $15/month.

It's up to the lessor to decide whether they want to forgive the value of destroyed in the possession of the lessee.  If you want to see this as me kissing some company's ass, I guess that's fine.
 
2013-06-14 11:22:06 AM  
Send the bill to the insurance company and let them deal with it. Problem solved. WTF?
 
2013-06-14 11:24:19 AM  

LineNoise: One of these threads again?

Yes, your insurance, (homeowners or renters, you are responsible and spend the like 75 bucks a year for renters insurance, right?) will take care of it, which is why direct tv will bill you. If they did not, anyone who wanted to get out of any contract ever could just make up some sob story, and companies would then have to play detective on everything.

Koodz: At least they let him cancel.  I remember Verizon charging me $200 to cancel my father's cell phone even after I brought them a copy of the death certificate.

Why shouldn't they? They are no different than any other creditor, be it a credit card, a mortgage, whatever, that the estate is OBLIGATED to pay out. Had your father died destitute, or had mr burnt dish mcdish been destitute, there are procedures in place to essentially say, "hey, we got nothing left to pay you with" to disolve the debt.

Lets say your dad owed 100k on his mortgage. Should the bank just say, "wow, sucks he is dead, we will forget about the 100k he owed us, enjoy the house!"


Well, he also wasn't using the phone number any more. He wasn't renting the phone from them when he burst into flames or something. The cancellation fee wasn't to recoup the value of a subsidized phone. It was purely punitive. You're a hell of a capitalist though. We need more of you in the world.
 
2013-06-14 11:26:35 AM  

tbhouston: Koodz: At least they let him cancel.  I remember Verizon charging me $200 to cancel my father's cell phone even after I brought them a copy of the death certificate.

I'm guessing there is more to this story.. Was the account wasn't in his name was it?


Yes, yes it was. His phone, his account. One line, and he had the same phone for more than two years, so it wasn't a discounted phone to pay off either.
 
2013-06-14 11:26:53 AM  

Dahnkster: We don't know if he was renting the home or was an owner as far as I can tell.


Beyond the facts that renter's insurance is about a fifth of the monthly cost of DirectTV, along with the fact that the TFA referred to Jeremy Beach's home, I've never encountered a landlord that would allow a renter to keep two dogs, a rabbit and chickens.
 
2013-06-14 11:30:33 AM  

thornhill: Bottom line is that you need to check your insurance policy and be ready to argue with the company.


that
 
2013-06-14 11:38:36 AM  

MythDragon: This is a little off topic, but I need to vent.
So I lose power due to the latest storm in VA. Lots of huge old trees, so when the wind blows stuff starts coming down and knocking out lines. Power goes out (ours did before the storm even started) and stays out for a while. Last major storm it was 8 days. (luckily my service line is still attached this time) Not to worry, I've got a generator to keep me up in cold Cokes and Xbox, but a limb took out my cable line. So no TV shows. But I've got the last three episodes of Revolution, 2 of Defiance, and a couple MLPs to watch. Wait, what's this? No signal apparently means my Goddamn DVR won't even turn on. It has power, I can hear things humming, but the power button does nothing. I un/replug it, and it goes through the boot process, gets as far as the Cisco screen, and then takes a shiat.

Apparently Comcast has decided, that if you don't have their express "OK" pinging into your machine 24 hours a day, you don't get to use their stuff. Not even to watch shows you *already* recorded. I guess this is so you can't take a DVR full of quality shows over to a friends house and let him get away with seeing something for free? Fark you, Comcast. It's bad enough that it takes 5 Goddamn days for you to fix the cablelines AFTER the power comes back, I would at least like to watch the shows I already have.

/And to think this is the route Xbox 1 is going...
//End rant.


*really easy solution*

as long as you have cable (I don't bother anymore), all you need is a TV card or usb coax adapter for either a laptop or a desktop. Dump a large hard drive in there, and Windows 7 and up have a pretty good DVR already built in called Windows Media Center.

The TV card will come with a remote, so it'll probably be *better* than the crappy Comcast DVR. Hell, you could even burn the shows off to a DVD or CD at that point.

All you have to do is hook the HDMI from the TV to either an HDMI out on your motherboard, or get a DVI to HMDI cable.

*even easier solution*

get a Roku or some other box like that (I haven't used them, but I've heard they are nice). -It's the same concept as above, but most of the work is done for you already.
 
2013-06-14 11:45:06 AM  

Gabrielmot: get a Roku or some other box like that (I haven't used them, but I've heard they are nice). -It's the same concept as above, but most of the work is done for you already.


I believe Roku's only a streaming device.
 
2013-06-14 12:06:49 PM  

Waldo Pepper: Maybe if you didn't spend the money on direct tv in the first place you would have money in savings to pay for those diapers and clothes for your family


Agreed.  I have a friend who whines because she is always broke and can't afford rent.  Yet she is always eating out, drinking with friends and spending huge sums on beauty supplies and treatments.  Obviously, she has decided what is more important in her life.  Having a roof is not one of them.
 
2013-06-14 12:11:55 PM  

NickelP: cheap_thoughts: Koodz: At least they let him cancel.  I remember Verizon charging me $200 to cancel my father's cell phone even after I brought them a copy of the death certificate.

You're not responsible for your parents debt.

No but If his dad has assets that were going to get passed on to him and he didn't want $200 to turn into $2000 + penalties/interest and a lawsuit against dads estate that would hold up its disposition it may be a good idea.


This right here. My father died intestate and my brother and sister couldn't be bothered to do anything so I spent the summer after college graduation paying bills, getting the house ready to sell, etc. It was a shiatty year.

I was impressed by how Ford handled things. He got a new Five Hundred before he got sick but only made five or six payments before he died and Ford simply took it back and didn't ask for anything. He was about $12K upside down on it at the time.
 
2013-06-14 12:35:30 PM  
 Ha, that's awesome because they couldn't care less about the dish, and unless it's an HR-34 they couldn't care less about the IRD. People have tried to sue unsuccessfully in order to get them to remove their dishes. It's all part of the fundamentally dishonest nature of the sat-tv industry in general. They use a mountain of trumped up debt in order to strong arm you into keeping their "service". They practically throw the equipment at you in order to get you signed up for as many features as they can but when you decide you can't afford or do not want their service they act like you stole it from  them and drop a shiatpot ton of cost on you at once in an effort to make you change your mind. Also a terrible service to support. Never again.
 
2013-06-14 01:00:19 PM  
I just don't get it. The house was destroyed due to wildfires. The article and comments mention the wildfires  LAST YEAR created a similar situation. If you live in an area where the terrain bursts into flame on an annual basis, shouldn't you consider moving to a less-burny part of the state?

I just do not understand the mentality of people who choose to remain in areas that get annual or frequent natural disasters. Sure, we can ALL be hit by freak natural occurrences, but when it's a regular thing  I don't see why people stay after the third or fourth time watching neighbors (or themselves) end up homeless or worse.

If gang activity can scare people out of a neighborhood, then why doesn't a raging annual wildfire or month of tornadoes have the same effect? What is it about fighting nature that makes people more willing to suffer than when fighting other people?
 
2013-06-14 01:05:04 PM  

ajgeek: DirecTV could've been a bit more tactful about that. The guy was obviously emotional as hell. He just lost his farking HOUSE! But I agree he owes the money, and the homeowner's insurance should cover it

/I know, tact is a 4 letter word.


I would say it has a lot to do with outsourcing their call center. Language barriers, ennui, etc.
 
2013-06-14 01:05:04 PM  

skozlaw: lack of warmth: All this sounds crazy to me. We had DirectTV and later cancelled, had them come back and they set up a new dish, we later cancelled again. We never paid for the dish or equipment and the dish is still sitting on my property. Never even got a call about returning anything, and now I am considering scrapping it. People put satellites dishes to the road all the time around here.

I think it depends on how old the equipment is. If gets to a point where the tech on it is old enough that it's nothing but scrap metal they're more than happy to just let it sit around being your problem instead of coming to clean it up.

Telcos do it all the time with business equipment. Ostensibly they want their stuff back when you cut off of them but 9 times out of 10 by the time you're ready to get rid of them routers, firewalls etc. that you were leasing are close enough to obsolete that they never actually bother to come and collect it. Then you wind up with piles of old, largely useless crap that just sits around forever.

/ the only telco equipment I'll never trash no matter how long it sits is shelf cards b/c those mfers are expensive


The first time we dropped them, I would agree with you.  The dish was first generation small dish.  The second time, we only had them for a couple years before dropping them.  They didn't even want the boxes back, and the dish is one of those four receiver dishes so each box had a dedicated line.  They tried giving us deals to keep us, but I was just too sick of loosing signal every time it snowed.  Even more annoying with a DVR.  Hey I'll watch that movie I recorded, only to get a recording of junk signal.  I've scrapped so many dishes left on the side of the road to suggest that it is common place around here.  When an apartment complex switched to cable, they never retrieved their dishes.  My buddy got 15 dishes out of it.  They really do treat the dishes as one time use around here.  That's why I don't get why they are playing the game different elsewhere.
 
2013-06-14 01:13:35 PM  
As I was reading that an add for DirecTV was on with people saying how great they were.
 
2013-06-14 01:16:53 PM  
This has nothing to do with personal responsibility.  Its just a way to rip off insurance companies(which we all pay for).  When you cancel direct the only thing they ever want back are the cards from the receivers and now that they have improved their security im not sure they even want them back.
 
2013-06-14 01:33:29 PM  
I had the same experience with another DISH provider.  My homeowner's insurance would only cover a set amount on the contents (which I more than cleared with my other possessions).  I did not receive the bill until six months after they had already established a new service, and the receiver in question was over 3 years old. I gave them a choice, either tear up the bill, or come retrieve their new equipment - which would be a smoldering pile of rubbish by the next day.

I am definitely in favor of personal accountability, but the provider would do well to consider future business and bad PR when writing these contracts. In my case, the receiver was old enough that it was worth nothing more than scrap value at best.  I did offer to ship it back to them if they would be so kind as to provide a shipping container. This offer was subsequently declined and the burned equipment was written off by the provider.
 
2013-06-14 01:39:57 PM  
Bottom line is that you need to check your insurance policy and be ready to argue with the com ...

I"m always surprised by the number of people who don't understand what kind of insurance they are paying for until after a claim happens.  "But I thought I had replacement cost coverage!"  You thought?  You are paying $1000 a year for this and you don't even know exactly what you purchased?
 
2013-06-14 01:49:31 PM  

cretinbob: That's what homeowners insurance is for


I'm not a huge fan of 'done in one', but in this case it works.

"I signed a contract and now I can't fulfill my part. Gimme something free. What do you mean no? THIS IS AN OUTRAGE... I CAN'T MANAGE LIFE'S SIMPLE TASKS!"

End snark.

Is it happy hour time yet?
 
2013-06-14 02:06:51 PM  
fark you pay me
 
2013-06-14 02:38:47 PM  

ggecko: So let's see, with this "logic", my brand new Corvette was also destroyed.  Yeah, I only made one payment, but you still expect me to pay for the car??


Yes.  That's how contract law works.  If you didn't insure the car, then that's on you, not the dealership.
 
2013-06-14 03:37:19 PM  
Look, of course DirecTV is due the money in the contract. I don't think anyone is disputing that except for those who believe that they are evil corporate whores who should be lucky we don't destroy them. There is a right and a wrong way to go about collecting the money and handling these calls when the inevitable fire, huricane, earthquake, flood strikes.

Demanding the money up front is a horrible burden on individuals who have just lost everything and are living day to day.  A better strategy would be to suspend the account from the disaster date, explain to them that the lost equipment is part of the homeowners claim and place a due date on the $400 payment well into the future so it can be settled down the road.  Insurance money may or may not pop up right away depending on the policy and the company therefore demanding the money immediately is rather cold and plays badly with the public.  The value of positive PR in a ceasepool of an industry like TV service is well over the cost of a few dozen obsolete dishes and receivers.
 
2013-06-14 05:15:21 PM  

The Only Jeff: ggecko: So let's see, with this "logic", my brand new Corvette was also destroyed.  Yeah, I only made one payment, but you still expect me to pay for the car??

Yes.  That's how contract law works.  If you didn't insure the car, then that's on you, not the dealership.


Wow, people don't understand that this is how the world works? You are on the hook for your actions which is why lenders require you to purchase insurance or get collateral so they know if you do what you said that they're still going to get paid. Or you show you understand you have to pay them no matter what by having a high credit score. Otherwise it would be prohibitively expensive to get loans.
 
2013-06-14 05:18:59 PM  

MadMattressMack: The Only Jeff: ggecko: So let's see, with this "logic", my brand new Corvette was also destroyed.  Yeah, I only made one payment, but you still expect me to pay for the car??

Yes.  That's how contract law works.  If you didn't insure the car, then that's on you, not the dealership.

Wow, people don't understand that this is how the world works? You are on the hook for your actions which is why lenders require you to purchase insurance or get collateral so they know if you do what you said that they're still going to get paid. Or you show you understand you have to pay them no matter what by having a high credit score. Otherwise it would be prohibitively expensive to get loans.


I guess i shouldn't be an a$$ on this. I had to learn this as well. And I had to learn a lot of stuff about lenders and laws by getting screwed over with bad advice from a bank and stupidity on my part when I was 18.
 
2013-06-14 06:14:09 PM  

Daedalus27: A better strategy would be to suspend the account from the disaster date, explain to them that the lost equipment is part of the homeowners claim and place a due date on the $400 payment well into the future so it can be settled down the road.


Who's to say that DirecTV didn't do exactly this?

TFA:   They told him he would owe $400 for a satellite dish and two receivers destroyed in the blaze.

They didn't say anything the due date.  In fact, the spokesperson mentions that it's covered by insurance.

DirecTV is probably better off just writing this shiat off rather than having people futz with insurance.  But it's simultaneously very clear to me that the guy here is proposing to pocket the insurance payout without compensating the owners of the rental equipment he had in his home.

On top of that, he's running off and whining to the press that DirecTV won't let him commit fraud by taking the compensation for the video equipment in his home and spending it on other shiat.
 
2013-06-14 06:22:54 PM  

The Muthaship: rufus-t-firefly: Securitywyrm: Exactly. Yeah it sucks that something bad happened to you, but you rented the dish from them. That's how it works.

But when you move, DirecTV tells you to just leave the dish behind and they send you another one.

It's been mentioned, but since it's not sinking in:

They told him he would owe $400 for a satellite dish and two receivers destroyed in the blaze.


Exactly. I think the charge was for the receivers, not the actual dish. When I canceled DirecTV, I had to send back the receivers, but they let me keep the dish (which was good because I didn't want to go on the roof to unbolt it).
 
2013-06-14 06:35:21 PM  

GizmoToy: TimonC346: The only reason I call shenanigans: there were 3 DirectTv dishes attached to my roof when my wife andi bought our house, farking 3. I have no idea why 3 would be needed, but they were there.

If it's anything like DISH, they have more than one orbit where their satellites are.  To get channels offered by both satellite constellations, you need multiple dishes.  For DISH, the majority of the channels were in one direction, but for my local HD channels a dish had to be pointed in a different direction.

So, I had two dishes.  I would imagine the same holds true for DirectTV


When I had DirecTV a little over a year ago, I had a dish that was pointed at 5 satellites at once as DirecTV's satellites are in the same area. The dish looks more like a tilted oval than a circle.

www.montanasatellite.com
 
2013-06-14 08:46:04 PM  
Hmm.. when i canceled direct tv they didnt even ask for the dish back.

It was still hanging on the house when i sold it.
 
2013-06-15 02:00:49 AM  

Babwa Wawa: Daedalus27: A better strategy would be to suspend the account from the disaster date, explain to them that the lost equipment is part of the homeowners claim and place a due date on the $400 payment well into the future so it can be settled down the road.

Who's to say that DirecTV didn't do exactly this?

TFA:   They told him he would owe $400 for a satellite dish and two receivers destroyed in the blaze.

They didn't say anything the due date.  In fact, the spokesperson mentions that it's covered by insurance.

DirecTV is probably better off just writing this shiat off rather than having people futz with insurance.  But it's simultaneously very clear to me that the guy here is proposing to pocket the insurance payout without compensating the owners of the rental equipment he had in his home.

On top of that, he's running off and whining to the press that DirecTV won't let him commit fraud by taking the compensation for the video equipment in his home and spending it on other shiat.


If they did do this, they would have come out and explained it.  I have to think the Indian or Phillipeans customer service representative had the script and had zero flexibility and the language/culture barrier comes out badly.
 
2013-06-15 08:40:14 AM  

Daedalus27: If they did do this, they would have come out and explained it.  I have to think the Indian or Phillipeans customer service representative had the script and had zero flexibility and the language/culture barrier comes out badly.


I disagree.  This whole story looks to me like this guy doesn't think he should have to pay DirecTV a dime for the gear, and therefore went running to the press about it.

the very fact that things like due dates and all the rest of the who/what/why/where/when/how is missing means to me that this has been spun to generate as much outrage as possible.
 
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