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(Colorado Springs Gazette)   "Hello, DirecTV? My house was destroyed in a fire so I need to cancel my account." "No problem, sir. That will be $400 for the dish that was on your house"   (gazette.com) divider line 168
    More: Asinine, Direct TV, Black Forest  
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6201 clicks; posted to Main » on 14 Jun 2013 at 7:21 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-06-14 08:51:08 AM

rgGolf4: FTA, other utilities and even Comcast absorbed the loss of equipment from the fires.  Did anyone catch that?   Comcast told them not to worry about the lost equipment.  That just goes to show how awful DirecTV is.

Its not hard for the company to investigate.

Look up address
Turn the news on
Has it been burned to the ground by wildfire?

Pretty easy.  While they may be right, its another lesson in bad PR.


Comcast was great when sandy destroyed all our stuff. When I dropped off the remotes that were dry they smiled and told me don't worry about the rest, and that they hoped we would be able to go home soon. I was happily surprised. I expected a bill for the equipment.
 
2013-06-14 08:53:11 AM

Babwa Wawa: Mr. Coffee Nerves: Slightly off-topic, but doesn't it seem like most of the personal satellite dishes are attached to mobile homes and cheap apartments? Maybe it's just me. I rarely see the things in newer developments but when I drive through town some of the older houses chopped up in to Section 8 apartments have so many dishes it looks like a branch office for SETI.

I think it's the density of those places that make you notice.  More dishes/sq foot.


People that live in nicer places tend to make better decisions too, in general.  A nice apartment dweller is far more likely to go visit their management office before installing a dish.  When they get told that they have to put a $500 deposit down, do the wiring stuff I mentioned, and confine it to their patio (which has no guarantee of even being able to get reception) or they dcould ya know just call the cable company and be done, they usually just call the cable company.  In the event that they just do whatever the fark they want and install it anyways, those types of tenants are much more capable of paying damages so the landlords will go after them and threaten/evict over violating the lease.

When you are dealing with tenants paying damn near nothing to live in some shiathole, they tend to do stupid stuff like just stick it up and worry about it later, or showup one day with 5 pit bulls.  The landlord in this case is a little more farked.  If damage has occurred it already has.  He can now issue a lease violation, charge back a deposit, and pursue an eviction if they don't pay it (which most won't or can't).  Now he can refuse rent, file a case with the court, hire an attorney, and lose another few months before it all is settled with the court and he has a new tenant.  Plus at this point the tenant is going to be pissed, trash the place, and waste hours of employee time in dealing with this entire affair.  Then after he gets a judgement he might get lucky to garnish $25 or $50 a month to pay for this thousands of damage. In a lot of places he also has to pay to refile that judgement every so often which may not even cover what he is getting.  It frankly just makes more sense not to go after poor tenants for a lot of shiat that you wouldn't hesitate to enforce against richer ones, and the poorer ones tend to create those types of issues a hell of a lot more often.

If you are renting upscale apartments tenants are pickier too, a lot of them think the dishes look awful and as a owner/manager they won't want their property not looking great.  A shiathole tenant commonly just is looking for some place that will accept his/her application and couldn't care less if it looks like a communication center.
 
DAR
2013-06-14 08:53:27 AM
having burned up a couple of Dish Network boxes during a recent house fire, I called them up to report the damage & get the infor to file against the insurance claim (which covered the whole cost of replacement).   They requested I ship the burned out box's shipped back which I did.  They claimed non-receipt on one of them........

Every 2 or 3 years (ish) some database or audit kicks out my name as still having one of the burned out hulks which I've paid them in full year ago and still have all the paperwork to prove it.

I just add the latest letter to the stack, copy it, & add a strongly worded letter, mailed to the company's HQ addressed to the CEO, this shuts up till the next database audit.......k/dar
 
2013-06-14 08:55:43 AM
This is a little off topic, but I need to vent.
So I lose power due to the latest storm in VA. Lots of huge old trees, so when the wind blows stuff starts coming down and knocking out lines. Power goes out (ours did before the storm even started) and stays out for a while. Last major storm it was 8 days. (luckily my service line is still attached this time) Not to worry, I've got a generator to keep me up in cold Cokes and Xbox, but a limb took out my cable line. So no TV shows. But I've got the last three episodes of Revolution, 2 of Defiance, and a couple MLPs to watch. Wait, what's this? No signal apparently means my Goddamn DVR won't even turn on. It has power, I can hear things humming, but the power button does nothing. I un/replug it, and it goes through the boot process, gets as far as the Cisco screen, and then takes a shiat.

Apparently Comcast has decided, that if you don't have their express "OK" pinging into your machine 24 hours a day, you don't get to use their stuff. Not even to watch shows you *already* recorded. I guess this is so you can't take a DVR full of quality shows over to a friends house and let him get away with seeing something for free? Fark you, Comcast. It's bad enough that it takes 5 Goddamn days for you to fix the cablelines AFTER the power comes back, I would at least like to watch the shows I already have.

/And to think this is the route Xbox 1 is going...
//End rant.
 
2013-06-14 08:58:50 AM

DAR: having burned up a couple of Dish Network boxes during a recent house fire, I called them up to report the damage & get the infor to file against the insurance claim (which covered the whole cost of replacement).   They requested I ship the burned out box's shipped back which I did.  They claimed non-receipt on one of them........

Every 2 or 3 years (ish) some database or audit kicks out my name as still having one of the burned out hulks which I've paid them in full year ago and still have all the paperwork to prove it.

I just add the latest letter to the stack, copy it, & add a strongly worded letter, mailed to the company's HQ addressed to the CEO, this shuts up till the next database audit.......k/dar


Why did they need them back if they were paid for?
 
2013-06-14 08:59:31 AM

rgGolf4: FTA, other utilities and even Comcast absorbed the loss of equipment from the fires. Did anyone catch that? Comcast told them not to worry about the lost equipment. That just goes to show how awful DirecTV is.


My thoughts exactly.  DirecTV is getting *slammed* in the PR department by Dish.  Every time a show goes to commercial I see another one ripping them a new one over how bad their rating is with the Better Business Bureau.

Customer service CAN make or break a company.

At one staff development day, we had speakers whose presentations were all about over the top customer service, and how this excellent customer service was 100% correlated to the success of the company.  One example was a car company (not saying which because someone will snark at it), when a guy showed up by mistake to get a part for a different make of car, THEY DROVE THE GUY TO THE OTHER DEALER.

The level of PR they got for that was extremely high.  If DirecTV wants to promote itself this would be a good place to start.  Good customer service is NEVER a bad thing.
 
2013-06-14 09:01:22 AM

badhatharry: cretinbob: That's what homeowners insurance is for

And what insurance adjusters are for. "Dear Directv, minus depreciation, your dish is worth $10.95. Here is your check."


Dracolich: Right, but as Badhatharry brought up, they've been depreciating all of their rental equipment. This puts the residual value much lower than starting price especially if they used an accelerated depreciation method. If they charge you more than the residual on this, they can't turn a profit on the amount that goes over the residual due to depreciation recapture. I'm not an accountant, so I may be a little off; but to me it looks like any amount that the guy is asked to pay over the residual goes straight to the gov't.


Insurance does not factor in depreciation or market value -- you're given what the replacement cost is. So to replace the DirectTV equipment, new equipment would need to be purchased, and you're given the money needed to do that.
 
2013-06-14 09:02:46 AM
I HATE directv and I don't even have it.  I moved into a new house, and the previous owner had DirectTV and had their satellite dish mounted in a really terrible place on the roof.  Since I didn't want DirectTV I called and asked whether they would come and get their dish.  They don't (I have to pay someone $150 to come take it down).  So, apparently, they don't  actually give a crap about their dishes, they just want to charge the people they can for them.
 
2013-06-14 09:07:11 AM
I had Direct TV and I moved.  They told me to leave the dish and pack up the equipment, they would hook everything up at the new place.  When they got to the new place, they couldn't service it because of a contract problem that I knew nothing about.  So, they told me that I had to go back to the old place and remove the dish and the eye or I would have to pay them $1000.  I only left everything there because they said they could service the new place and there would be no charges.  This was not my fault.
The people that had rented the new place had Direct TV hooked up and I couldn't go ripping down their dish.  That is exactly what Direct TV told me to do.
I called he landlord of the rental property and had to get him involved.  It ended up that I had to close my bank account to keep them from removing the money and it took me two years to get it off of my credit.
 
2013-06-14 09:09:20 AM
i1056.photobucket.com
 
2013-06-14 09:09:48 AM

Koodz: At least they let him cancel.  I remember Verizon charging me $200 to cancel my father's cell phone even after I brought them a copy of the death certificate.


You should have told them to bill your father.
 
2013-06-14 09:12:46 AM

GalFriday: I had Direct TV and I moved.  They told me to leave the dish and pack up the equipment, they would hook everything up at the new place.  When they got to the new place, they couldn't service it because of a contract problem that I knew nothing about.  So, they told me that I had to go back to the old place and remove the dish and the eye or I would have to pay them $1000.  I only left everything there because they said they could service the new place and there would be no charges.  This was not my fault.
The people that had rented the new place had Direct TV hooked up and I couldn't go ripping down their dish.  That is exactly what Direct TV told me to do.
I called he landlord of the rental property and had to get him involved.  It ended up that I had to close my bank account to keep them from removing the money and it took me two years to get it off of my credit.


thats bs but i think i would of purchased a $20 dish and sent it to them in order to make that entire problem go away
 
2013-06-14 09:14:20 AM

LineNoise: NickelP: Hi its the semi-annual directv/comcast whoever wouldn't give me free shiat just because something bad happened to me and I'm too lazy to add it to the insurance claim article!

In all seriousness though I don't know why DirecTV doesn't insure these things theirselves just to avoid the bad PR.  The cost of doing that has to be negligible.

Its a headache. If they tried to stake some kind of ownership claim in the physical dish, you would have people trying to sue them every time some poorly installed one fell on some


some what? feathers, piles of paper, potato chips, cheese, candy???

I am in suspense here.
 
2013-06-14 09:15:30 AM
I know someone who had Verizon FIOS.  The guy's house burned to the ground and he was charged by Verizon for the destroyed router and other gear they supplied. Always read the contract and see if you'll be held responsible for the cable/net service provider's gear if it gets trashed through no fault of your own, like fire or storm.  If it says you're on the hook during the contract period, no matter what, tell them, "no thanks".  If they reply that they won't hold you responsible if you'll sign up, make sure you get it in writing.
 
2013-06-14 09:16:39 AM

thornhill: badhatharry: cretinbob: That's what homeowners insurance is for

And what insurance adjusters are for. "Dear Directv, minus depreciation, your dish is worth $10.95. Here is your check."

Dracolich: Right, but as Badhatharry brought up, they've been depreciating all of their rental equipment. This puts the residual value much lower than starting price especially if they used an accelerated depreciation method. If they charge you more than the residual on this, they can't turn a profit on the amount that goes over the residual due to depreciation recapture. I'm not an accountant, so I may be a little off; but to me it looks like any amount that the guy is asked to pay over the residual goes straight to the gov't.

Insurance does not factor in depreciation or market value -- you're given what the replacement cost is. So to replace the DirectTV equipment, new equipment would need to be purchased, and you're given the money needed to do that.


The insurance only owes to replace it with one of a similar condition as the one that was lost, not a new one. Since it will most likely not be replaced, they owe Directv the actual cash value.
 
2013-06-14 09:24:27 AM
Hmmm.... oh, look at that, I included the value of things like my Dish receiver in my homeowner's insurance when I last reviewed and modified it.

And if $400 is a lot to you, maybe you should have cancelled service for three or four months and banked the savings. Satellite TV isn't exactly cheap.

24.media.tumblr.com
/ And why the fark were there chickens in the house?
 
2013-06-14 09:26:04 AM
I thought all of these homes in Black Forest were million dollar homes on 3-5 acres of land.  If you can afford a million dollar home, I'd think you have money for diapers and such.

That said, it sounds like Directtv is being jerky considering the circumstances...
 
2013-06-14 09:30:59 AM
All this sounds crazy to me.  We had DirectTV and later cancelled, had them come back and they set up a new dish, we later cancelled again.  We never paid for the dish or equipment and the dish is still sitting on my property.  Never even got a call about returning anything, and now I am considering scrapping it.  People put satellites dishes to the road all the time around here.

/we got rid of it due to loosing signal all the time during hard weather.
//we took them back only because of the dish improvements which wasn't much better
 
2013-06-14 09:39:13 AM

Alonjar: Um... Yeah... That's how it works.a contract is a contract and it should be covered by isurance


But only between Ferengi.
 
2013-06-14 09:41:01 AM

NickelP: Babwa Wawa: Mr. Coffee Nerves: Slightly off-topic, but doesn't it seem like most of the personal satellite dishes are attached to mobile homes and cheap apartments? Maybe it's just me. I rarely see the things in newer developments but when I drive through town some of the older houses chopped up in to Section 8 apartments have so many dishes it looks like a branch office for SETI.

I think it's the density of those places that make you notice.  More dishes/sq foot.

People that live in nicer places tend to make better decisions too, in general.  A nice apartment dweller is far more likely to go visit their management office before installing a dish.  When they get told that they have to put a $500 deposit down, do the wiring stuff I mentioned, and confine it to their patio (which has no guarantee of even being able to get reception) or they dcould ya know just call the cable company and be done, they usually just call the cable company.  In the event that they just do whatever the fark they want and install it anyways, those types of tenants are much more capable of paying damages so the landlords will go after them and threaten/evict over violating the lease.

When you are dealing with tenants paying damn near nothing to live in some shiathole, they tend to do stupid stuff like just stick it up and worry about it later, or showup one day with 5 pit bulls.  The landlord in this case is a little more farked.  If damage has occurred it already has.  He can now issue a lease violation, charge back a deposit, and pursue an eviction if they don't pay it (which most won't or can't).  Now he can refuse rent, file a case with the court, hire an attorney, and lose another few months before it all is settled with the court and he has a new tenant.  Plus at this point the tenant is going to be pissed, trash the place, and waste hours of employee time in dealing with this entire affair.  Then after he gets a judgement he might get lucky to garnish $25 or $50 a month to pay for ...


That would be an illegal restriction. The law was written so that any consumer would have access to the cable/sat provider of choice. If the restrictions prevent access, then they violate the law.
 
2013-06-14 09:41:31 AM

lack of warmth: All this sounds crazy to me. We had DirectTV and later cancelled, had them come back and they set up a new dish, we later cancelled again. We never paid for the dish or equipment and the dish is still sitting on my property. Never even got a call about returning anything, and now I am considering scrapping it. People put satellites dishes to the road all the time around here.


I think it depends on how old the equipment is. If gets to a point where the tech on it is old enough that it's nothing but scrap metal they're more than happy to just let it sit around being your problem instead of coming to clean it up.

Telcos do it all the time with business equipment. Ostensibly they want their stuff back when you cut off of them but 9 times out of 10 by the time you're ready to get rid of them routers, firewalls etc. that you were leasing are close enough to obsolete that they never actually bother to come and collect it. Then you wind up with piles of old, largely useless crap that just sits around forever.

/ the only telco equipment I'll never trash no matter how long it sits is shelf cards b/c those mfers are expensive
 
2013-06-14 09:42:51 AM

d23: well damn me to hell for thinking that basic humanity and common sense should trump a contract!  Whoo wee!


This guy wants to pocket the insurance money that covers the rented shiat in his house, instead of paying the owners of the aforementioned rented shiat.   You don't have to be a corporate shill to realize that's both fraudulent and wrong.

Dahnkster: Stop making sense. You'd better get with the program citizen. Bow down before your corporate betters.   DirecTV is your friend. How do you ever expect the poors to learn personal responsibility and boot-strappiness? After all, fires are an act of God.


Same goes for you.
 
2013-06-14 09:43:15 AM

DAR: having burned up a couple of Dish Network boxes during a recent house fire, I called them up to report the damage & get the infor to file against the insurance claim (which covered the whole cost of replacement).   They requested I ship the burned out box's shipped back which I did.  They claimed non-receipt on one of them........

Every 2 or 3 years (ish) some database or audit kicks out my name as still having one of the burned out hulks which I've paid them in full year ago and still have all the paperwork to prove it.

I just add the latest letter to the stack, copy it, & add a strongly worded letter, mailed to the company's HQ addressed to the CEO, this shuts up till the next database audit.......k/dar


I think you should have your lawyer send the letter out on his/her stationary... they tend to actually pay attention if it comes from a lawyer.
 
2013-06-14 09:43:28 AM

Babwa Wawa: Waldo Pepper: If for some reason this guy has no fire insurance I can understand him making a fuss.

Why the hell should him having insurance make a damned bit of difference?


If he doesn't have insurance it makes sense for him to try and get out of paying for the equipment. Why is that so hard to understand?
 
DAR
2013-06-14 09:44:54 AM

5monkeys: Why did they need them back if they were paid for?


no idea, think it just a warehouse audit type of thing........k/dar
 
2013-06-14 09:47:04 AM
I see everything I came to say has been well covered.
 
2013-06-14 09:48:13 AM

HindiDiscoMonster: Koodz: At least they let him cancel.  I remember Verizon charging me $200 to cancel my father's cell phone even after I brought them a copy of the death certificate.

You should have told them to bill your father.


My dad passed away years ago and my Mom now has alzheimer's. The propane guy comes and delivers and leaves the bill on the doorknob, as the account is still in my Dad's name my Mom takes the bill writes "He is in Heaven" and sends it back to the company.
 
2013-06-14 09:52:06 AM

Waldo Pepper: HindiDiscoMonster: Koodz: At least they let him cancel.  I remember Verizon charging me $200 to cancel my father's cell phone even after I brought them a copy of the death certificate.

You should have told them to bill your father.

My dad passed away years ago and my Mom now has alzheimer's. The propane guy comes and delivers and leaves the bill on the doorknob, as the account is still in my Dad's name my Mom takes the bill writes "He is in Heaven" and sends it back to the company.


I know he passed away... that was the point...
you: "Bill my father... it's his phone."
Verion: "Didn't he pass away?"
you: "yes"
Verizon: ...
You:archive.4plebs.org
 
2013-06-14 09:53:27 AM

HindiDiscoMonster: NickelP: Babwa Wawa: Mr. Coffee Nerves: Slightly off-topic, but doesn't it seem like most of the personal satellite dishes are attached to mobile homes and cheap apartments? Maybe it's just me. I rarely see the things in newer developments but when I drive through town some of the older houses chopped up in to Section 8 apartments have so many dishes it looks like a branch office for SETI.

I think it's the density of those places that make you notice.  More dishes/sq foot.

People that live in nicer places tend to make better decisions too, in general.  A nice apartment dweller is far more likely to go visit their management office before installing a dish.  When they get told that they have to put a $500 deposit down, do the wiring stuff I mentioned, and confine it to their patio (which has no guarantee of even being able to get reception) or they dcould ya know just call the cable company and be done, they usually just call the cable company.  In the event that they just do whatever the fark they want and install it anyways, those types of tenants are much more capable of paying damages so the landlords will go after them and threaten/evict over violating the lease.

When you are dealing with tenants paying damn near nothing to live in some shiathole, they tend to do stupid stuff like just stick it up and worry about it later, or showup one day with 5 pit bulls.  The landlord in this case is a little more farked.  If damage has occurred it already has.  He can now issue a lease violation, charge back a deposit, and pursue an eviction if they don't pay it (which most won't or can't).  Now he can refuse rent, file a case with the court, hire an attorney, and lose another few months before it all is settled with the court and he has a new tenant.  Plus at this point the tenant is going to be pissed, trash the place, and waste hours of employee time in dealing with this entire affair.  Then after he gets a judgement he might get lucky to garnish $25 or $50 a month to ...


You can't write restrictions to prevent access, that does not mean the same thing as no restrictions COULD prevent access.  If you normally are allowed to place stuff in an area (such as a patio) then you are allowed to place a satellite there.  The landlord can't do something to block reception, but they can impose the same types of restrictions they impose on other items.  For example if they don't normally allow you to place personal items on the roof they can tell you that you are not allowed to place a satellite there.  If the tenant wants satellite they have every opportunity to investigate reception issues before signing a lease.  If they fail to do that it doesn't become the landlords responsibility to ensure reception.  It is really no different than apartments with lots of trees.  The landlord doesn't have to cut them down because they are in the way.

At least that was always my understanding of the law, I'm not going to pretend to be an expert, but that interpretation is consistent with everything I've ever seen from satellite forums and how management companies actually handle the issue.
 
2013-06-14 09:56:39 AM

SaladMonkey: I HATE directv and I don't even have it.  I moved into a new house, and the previous owner had DirectTV and had their satellite dish mounted in a really terrible place on the roof.  Since I didn't want DirectTV I called and asked whether they would come and get their dish.  They don't (I have to pay someone $150 to come take it down).  So, apparently, they don't  actually give a crap about their dishes, they just want to charge the people they can for them.


I wonder if you could send them a demand letter to get their farking crap off your property in 10 days or pay daily storage fees.
 
2013-06-14 10:03:29 AM

NickelP: You can't write restrictions to prevent access, that does not mean the same thing as no restrictions COULD prevent access. If you normally are allowed to place stuff in an area (such as a patio) then you are allowed to place a satellite there. The landlord can't do something to block reception, but they can impose the same types of restrictions they impose on other items. For example if they don't normally allow you to place personal items on the roof they can tell you that you are not allowed to place a satellite there. If the tenant wants satellite they have every opportunity to investigate reception issues before signing a lease. If they fail to do that it doesn't become the landlords responsibility to ensure reception. It is really no different than apartments with lots of trees. The landlord doesn't have to cut them down because they are in the way.

At least that was always my understanding of the law, I'm not going to pretend to be an expert, but that interpretation is consistent with everything I've ever seen from satellite forums and how management companies actually handle the issue.


What they cannot do is prevent you from having access. If there are already things such as trees blocking the clear sky view you need then you are correct... the landlord does not have to cut them down. What the landlord does have to do is allow the dish to be installed in a location with access (in Florida - elsewhere, your mileage may vary).
 
2013-06-14 10:04:42 AM

BarkingUnicorn: SaladMonkey: I HATE directv and I don't even have it.  I moved into a new house, and the previous owner had DirectTV and had their satellite dish mounted in a really terrible place on the roof.  Since I didn't want DirectTV I called and asked whether they would come and get their dish.  They don't (I have to pay someone $150 to come take it down).  So, apparently, they don't  actually give a crap about their dishes, they just want to charge the people they can for them.

I wonder if you could send them a demand letter to get their farking crap off your property in 10 days or pay daily storage fees.


additionally, what would be funny is they default on what they owe you in storage, and you send THEM to collections... :)
 
2013-06-14 10:08:40 AM

badhatharry: thornhill: badhatharry: cretinbob: That's what homeowners insurance is for

And what insurance adjusters are for. "Dear Directv, minus depreciation, your dish is worth $10.95. Here is your check."

Dracolich: Right, but as Badhatharry brought up, they've been depreciating all of their rental equipment. This puts the residual value much lower than starting price especially if they used an accelerated depreciation method. If they charge you more than the residual on this, they can't turn a profit on the amount that goes over the residual due to depreciation recapture. I'm not an accountant, so I may be a little off; but to me it looks like any amount that the guy is asked to pay over the residual goes straight to the gov't.

Insurance does not factor in depreciation or market value -- you're given what the replacement cost is. So to replace the DirectTV equipment, new equipment would need to be purchased, and you're given the money needed to do that.

The insurance only owes to replace it with one of a similar condition as the one that was lost, not a new one. Since it will most likely not be replaced, they owe Directv the actual cash value.


You're confusing "replacement value" and "actual value."

This is how replacement value works: the insurance company looks at what it would cost to replace that item. If the DirectTV equipment cost $400 to purchase in 2007, for example, but today comprable equipment can be purchased for $300, then you get only $300. But you only get that money when you replace the item.

Actual value does factor in depreciation, but that rate is negotiable (or rather, something you can argue to get reduced). The insurance company will try to apply a blanket depreciation rate to all of your property, but clearly not everything depreciates at the same rate, and some things do not depreciate at all, such as art and certain types of furniture.

Bottom line is that you need to check your insurance policy and be ready to argue with the company.
 
2013-06-14 10:20:13 AM

MooseUpNorth: abhorrent1: Does he expect the bank to forgive his mortgage too?

He should. At least in Canada, banks tend to require insurance (with the bank as beneficiary) as a condition for granting that mortgage. House burns down, insurance pays off the mortgage, everybody walks away.


Umm...this. Not only did I have to carry the standard home owners insurance, but where I live I have to carry flood insurance. I was shocked when the FEMA maps came back with my neighborhood in the highest of high risk areas, we are at least 5-10 miles from the nearest river. Because my street is 1 foot lower then the street one block over it gets classified in the highest flood risk while the street one block over gets classified in a much lower catagory. Difference in insurance $600 a year.
 
2013-06-14 10:21:03 AM

Babwa Wawa: This guy wants to pocket the insurance money that covers the rented shiat in his house, instead of paying the owners of the aforementioned rented shiat. You don't have to be a corporate shill to realize that's both fraudulent and wrong.


Where in the article does it say the guy has insurance? We don't know if he was renting the home or was an owner as far as I can tell. But you sure seem hellbent on tongue-punching DirecTV's fart box.  Good for you. Next time you should get some long pants when your mom buys you a suit. You're a big boy now. Yes you are. Who's a big boy? You're a big boy.
 
2013-06-14 10:36:19 AM
So let's see, with this "logic", my brand new Corvette was also destroyed.  Yeah, I only made one payment, but you still expect me to pay for the car??
 
2013-06-14 11:14:02 AM

Mr. Coffee Nerves: Slightly off-topic, but doesn't it seem like most of the personal satellite dishes are attached to mobile homes and cheap apartments? Maybe it's just me. I rarely see the things in newer developments but when I drive through town some of the older houses chopped up in to Section 8 apartments have so many dishes it looks like a branch office for SETI.


No, I see dishes all over the place, but many homeowners are better at hiding them than what an apartment or mobile home dweller can do.
 
2013-06-14 11:16:47 AM
Also, newer neighborhoods may have deed restrictions barring or forcing the dish to be hidden.  Dishes may also be more prevalent in areas that the cable companies don't offer service or updated service.
 
2013-06-14 11:21:09 AM

Dahnkster: Where in the article does it say the guy has insurance? We don't know if he was renting the home or was an owner as far as I can tell. But you sure seem hellbent on tongue-punching DirecTV's fart box.  Good for you. Next time you should get some long pants when your mom buys you a suit. You're a big boy now. Yes you are. Who's a big boy? You're a big boy.


And since when does a lack of insurance forgive people of their debts?  Renter's insurance is like $15/month.

It's up to the lessor to decide whether they want to forgive the value of destroyed in the possession of the lessee.  If you want to see this as me kissing some company's ass, I guess that's fine.
 
2013-06-14 11:22:06 AM
Send the bill to the insurance company and let them deal with it. Problem solved. WTF?
 
2013-06-14 11:24:19 AM

LineNoise: One of these threads again?

Yes, your insurance, (homeowners or renters, you are responsible and spend the like 75 bucks a year for renters insurance, right?) will take care of it, which is why direct tv will bill you. If they did not, anyone who wanted to get out of any contract ever could just make up some sob story, and companies would then have to play detective on everything.

Koodz: At least they let him cancel.  I remember Verizon charging me $200 to cancel my father's cell phone even after I brought them a copy of the death certificate.

Why shouldn't they? They are no different than any other creditor, be it a credit card, a mortgage, whatever, that the estate is OBLIGATED to pay out. Had your father died destitute, or had mr burnt dish mcdish been destitute, there are procedures in place to essentially say, "hey, we got nothing left to pay you with" to disolve the debt.

Lets say your dad owed 100k on his mortgage. Should the bank just say, "wow, sucks he is dead, we will forget about the 100k he owed us, enjoy the house!"


Well, he also wasn't using the phone number any more. He wasn't renting the phone from them when he burst into flames or something. The cancellation fee wasn't to recoup the value of a subsidized phone. It was purely punitive. You're a hell of a capitalist though. We need more of you in the world.
 
2013-06-14 11:26:35 AM

tbhouston: Koodz: At least they let him cancel.  I remember Verizon charging me $200 to cancel my father's cell phone even after I brought them a copy of the death certificate.

I'm guessing there is more to this story.. Was the account wasn't in his name was it?


Yes, yes it was. His phone, his account. One line, and he had the same phone for more than two years, so it wasn't a discounted phone to pay off either.
 
2013-06-14 11:26:53 AM

Dahnkster: We don't know if he was renting the home or was an owner as far as I can tell.


Beyond the facts that renter's insurance is about a fifth of the monthly cost of DirectTV, along with the fact that the TFA referred to Jeremy Beach's home, I've never encountered a landlord that would allow a renter to keep two dogs, a rabbit and chickens.
 
2013-06-14 11:30:33 AM

thornhill: Bottom line is that you need to check your insurance policy and be ready to argue with the company.


that
 
2013-06-14 11:38:36 AM

MythDragon: This is a little off topic, but I need to vent.
So I lose power due to the latest storm in VA. Lots of huge old trees, so when the wind blows stuff starts coming down and knocking out lines. Power goes out (ours did before the storm even started) and stays out for a while. Last major storm it was 8 days. (luckily my service line is still attached this time) Not to worry, I've got a generator to keep me up in cold Cokes and Xbox, but a limb took out my cable line. So no TV shows. But I've got the last three episodes of Revolution, 2 of Defiance, and a couple MLPs to watch. Wait, what's this? No signal apparently means my Goddamn DVR won't even turn on. It has power, I can hear things humming, but the power button does nothing. I un/replug it, and it goes through the boot process, gets as far as the Cisco screen, and then takes a shiat.

Apparently Comcast has decided, that if you don't have their express "OK" pinging into your machine 24 hours a day, you don't get to use their stuff. Not even to watch shows you *already* recorded. I guess this is so you can't take a DVR full of quality shows over to a friends house and let him get away with seeing something for free? Fark you, Comcast. It's bad enough that it takes 5 Goddamn days for you to fix the cablelines AFTER the power comes back, I would at least like to watch the shows I already have.

/And to think this is the route Xbox 1 is going...
//End rant.


*really easy solution*

as long as you have cable (I don't bother anymore), all you need is a TV card or usb coax adapter for either a laptop or a desktop. Dump a large hard drive in there, and Windows 7 and up have a pretty good DVR already built in called Windows Media Center.

The TV card will come with a remote, so it'll probably be *better* than the crappy Comcast DVR. Hell, you could even burn the shows off to a DVD or CD at that point.

All you have to do is hook the HDMI from the TV to either an HDMI out on your motherboard, or get a DVI to HMDI cable.

*even easier solution*

get a Roku or some other box like that (I haven't used them, but I've heard they are nice). -It's the same concept as above, but most of the work is done for you already.
 
2013-06-14 11:45:06 AM

Gabrielmot: get a Roku or some other box like that (I haven't used them, but I've heard they are nice). -It's the same concept as above, but most of the work is done for you already.


I believe Roku's only a streaming device.
 
2013-06-14 12:06:49 PM

Waldo Pepper: Maybe if you didn't spend the money on direct tv in the first place you would have money in savings to pay for those diapers and clothes for your family


Agreed.  I have a friend who whines because she is always broke and can't afford rent.  Yet she is always eating out, drinking with friends and spending huge sums on beauty supplies and treatments.  Obviously, she has decided what is more important in her life.  Having a roof is not one of them.
 
2013-06-14 12:11:55 PM

NickelP: cheap_thoughts: Koodz: At least they let him cancel.  I remember Verizon charging me $200 to cancel my father's cell phone even after I brought them a copy of the death certificate.

You're not responsible for your parents debt.

No but If his dad has assets that were going to get passed on to him and he didn't want $200 to turn into $2000 + penalties/interest and a lawsuit against dads estate that would hold up its disposition it may be a good idea.


This right here. My father died intestate and my brother and sister couldn't be bothered to do anything so I spent the summer after college graduation paying bills, getting the house ready to sell, etc. It was a shiatty year.

I was impressed by how Ford handled things. He got a new Five Hundred before he got sick but only made five or six payments before he died and Ford simply took it back and didn't ask for anything. He was about $12K upside down on it at the time.
 
2013-06-14 12:35:30 PM
 Ha, that's awesome because they couldn't care less about the dish, and unless it's an HR-34 they couldn't care less about the IRD. People have tried to sue unsuccessfully in order to get them to remove their dishes. It's all part of the fundamentally dishonest nature of the sat-tv industry in general. They use a mountain of trumped up debt in order to strong arm you into keeping their "service". They practically throw the equipment at you in order to get you signed up for as many features as they can but when you decide you can't afford or do not want their service they act like you stole it from  them and drop a shiatpot ton of cost on you at once in an effort to make you change your mind. Also a terrible service to support. Never again.
 
2013-06-14 01:00:19 PM
I just don't get it. The house was destroyed due to wildfires. The article and comments mention the wildfires  LAST YEAR created a similar situation. If you live in an area where the terrain bursts into flame on an annual basis, shouldn't you consider moving to a less-burny part of the state?

I just do not understand the mentality of people who choose to remain in areas that get annual or frequent natural disasters. Sure, we can ALL be hit by freak natural occurrences, but when it's a regular thing  I don't see why people stay after the third or fourth time watching neighbors (or themselves) end up homeless or worse.

If gang activity can scare people out of a neighborhood, then why doesn't a raging annual wildfire or month of tornadoes have the same effect? What is it about fighting nature that makes people more willing to suffer than when fighting other people?
 
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