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(Time)   Beer bellies are a myth, tubby   (newsfeed.time.com) divider line 74
    More: PSA, abdominal obesity, visceral fat, serving sizes, liver damage  
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7133 clicks; posted to Main » on 14 Jun 2013 at 6:46 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-06-14 08:58:06 AM
Also, cirrhosis makes even larger bellies

2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-06-14 08:59:07 AM

Vertdang: Also, cirrhosis makes even larger bellies

[2.bp.blogspot.com image 300x399]


He looks happy, maybe I should give alcoholism a try?
 
2013-06-14 09:01:00 AM

Beta Tested: sboyle1020: I have a "beer gut", but it's hard it's not all flabby like you would typically see in an overweight person with rolls and what not.  Is that just my body type?  Anyone have the same?  And it only notice weight gain in the stomach and a little in that face, no place else...

That is visceral or intraorgan fat.  It is the very dangerous kind, the one that gives you metabolic syndrome and heart attacks.  The rolly flabby, or subcutaneous, fat isn't very pleasant to look at but comparatively isn't all that dangerous.

You genes and hormones determine where, how, and how much fat is stored.  So yea, it is genetic, but you've rolled a bad number and your body stores it in the worst way possible.


Also love good news on a Friday...guess I need to get my butt to the gym

God Is My Co-Pirate: sboyle1020: I have a "beer gut", but it's hard it's not all flabby like you would typically see in an overweight person with rolls and what not.  Is that just my body type?  Anyone have the same?  And it only notice weight gain in the stomach and a little in that face, no place else...

Are you pregnant?


Haha, that could explain it!  I've been living a lie for 30 years...it's not THAT hard, there's some flab but doesn't jiggle like a normal fat belly, if that makes any sense.
 
2013-06-14 09:08:09 AM

sboyle1020: Also love good news on a Friday...guess I need to get my butt to the gym


Well, the good news is that visceral fat is usually the first to go when you start eating properly and exercising, which is why overweight but active people are still pretty healthy. While they keep the subcutaneous fat they don't have all that much visceral fat.

The bad news is that you pretty much have to give up alcohol and sugar (fructose specifically), and basically think of them as the same thing.  For example, a decent rule of thumb is to keep sugar/alcohol intake to 2 beers OR sodas a week.
 
2013-06-14 09:09:09 AM
I'm still rather skeptical on the idea that "calories are calories" when it comes to fat gain, just as I am very skeptical on the idea that "alcohol is alcohol" when it comes to getting drunk.
 
2013-06-14 09:13:15 AM
I drink a lot of beer and I don't have a beer gut (5'11" and 195 lb.). I also run a lot of miles. I'm almost 50 and this is me finishing my first marathon about 2 months ago. Calories in - Calories out.
 
2013-06-14 09:13:20 AM

sboyle1020: I have a "beer gut", but it's hard it's not all flabby like you would typically see in an overweight person with rolls and what not.  Is that just my body type?  Anyone have the same?  And it only notice weight gain in the stomach and a little in that face, no place else...


I'm kind of in the same boat. Skinnyfat.

I look like those starving kids with the distended bellies.

Though I wouldn't describe my pouch as "hard", it has a pillow-like quality that my cat enjoys.
 
2013-06-14 09:14:49 AM

A Leaf in Fall: I'm still rather skeptical on the idea that "calories are calories" when it comes to fat gain, just as I am very skeptical on the idea that "alcohol is alcohol" when it comes to getting drunk.


You are right about the first part.  A Calorie is not a Calorie when it comes to metabolic syndrome and weight gain.  You can watch a good, concise, scientifically supported explanation of the obesity epidemic on Youtube from UC
 
2013-06-14 09:14:51 AM
image dimensions are too small? That's a weird error.
 
2013-06-14 09:17:57 AM

NoGods: image dimensions are too small? That's a weird error.


THATSWHATSHESAID!
 
2013-06-14 09:24:48 AM
Yeah, used to be when I felt a bit heavy, I'd lay off the booze and the mid-morning muffins and I'd spring back into shape. Then I hit my mid-30s and had two kids, and I cannot get rid of that last inch or so around my waist.

Well, "cannot" without being miserable and cranky all the time because I can't have my wine and my brie.
 
2013-06-14 09:25:09 AM

The Googles Do Nothing: NoGods: image dimensions are too small? That's a weird error.

THATSWHATSHESAID!


What? "That's a weird error"?  That's not funny.
 
2013-06-14 09:33:56 AM

HotWingConspiracy: sboyle1020: I have a "beer gut", but it's hard it's not all flabby like you would typically see in an overweight person with rolls and what not.  Is that just my body type?  Anyone have the same?  And it only notice weight gain in the stomach and a little in that face, no place else...

I'm kind of in the same boat. Skinnyfat.

I look like those starving kids with the distended bellies.

Though I wouldn't describe my pouch as "hard", it has a pillow-like quality that my cat enjoys.


He's talking about the hard pregnant belly that looks and feels like a bowling ball under the shirt. Middle aged man's curse. Skinnyfat's more annoying and a lot harder to lose, short of lipo.
 
2013-06-14 09:35:12 AM

violentsalvation: UC Davis huh? So alcohol doesn't cause my tummy, OK so there is more to my beer than alcohol. But you would know that wouldn't you, UC Davis?


I don't know if you're kidding or not, but UC Davis has one of the best brewing education programs in the nation.

http://extension.ucdavis.edu/unit/brewing/course/description/?type=A& u nit=BR&SectionID=164401&prglist=MBP">http://extension.ucdavis.edu/uni t/brewing/course/description/?type=A&u nit=BR&SectionID=164401&prglist=MBP
 
2013-06-14 11:30:35 AM
This is "me" finishing my first marathon, guys!
 
2013-06-14 11:37:59 AM
This seems like Government Grant jobs territory
 
2013-06-14 01:24:01 PM
It's not the beer that makes you fat, it's the chicken wings, pork rinds, sandwiches and all the other junk you eat while you drink the beer that's the main problem. I've known plenty of skinny drunks.
 
2013-06-14 03:27:49 PM

sboyle1020: I have a "beer gut", but it's hard it's not all flabby like you would typically see in an overweight person with rolls and what not.  Is that just my body type?  Anyone have the same?  And it only notice weight gain in the stomach and a little in that face, no place else...


It's probably a giant tumor. Don't worry about it.

Seriously, I vaguely remember that it's fat around your organs if it's hard rather than fat outside the abdominal wall that jiggles. Or something like that. Either way it doesn't really matter. If you're fat, you should lose weight.
 
2013-06-14 03:57:55 PM

TheJoe03: jimmyego: "You are drinking it in more quantities than wine or liquor, so you tend to have more caloric intake"

So they are not a myth then.  Good article.

Came here to point that out, really misleading study. You need more beer to get drunk than you would need liquor, so it makes you fatter than other types of alcohol.


Also it is by volume a lot more fluid, so your stomach/etc becomes distended.
 
2013-06-15 01:24:41 AM

sboyle1020: I have a "beer gut", but it's hard it's not all flabby like you would typically see in an overweight person with rolls and what not.  Is that just my body type?  Anyone have the same?  And it only notice weight gain in the stomach and a little in that face, no place else...


You have under the muscle fat accumulation in your abdominal cavity.

/as do I.
//in my case, quite a bit
///
 
2013-06-15 02:36:55 AM

Jument: Seriously, I vaguely remember that it's fat around your organs if it's hard rather than fat outside the abdominal wall that jiggles. Or something like that. Either way it doesn't really matter. If you're fat, you should lose weight.


It matters quite a lot actually.  Visceral fat is very, very dangerous (either it causes heart disease directly or is an excellent marker for heart disease).  Subcutaneous fat, without visceral, is relatively benign.
 
2013-06-15 02:58:47 AM

Beta Tested: Jument: Seriously, I vaguely remember that it's fat around your organs if it's hard rather than fat outside the abdominal wall that jiggles. Or something like that. Either way it doesn't really matter. If you're fat, you should lose weight.

It matters quite a lot actually.  Visceral fat is very, very dangerous (either it causes heart disease directly or is an excellent marker for heart disease).  Subcutaneous fat, without visceral, is relatively benign.


Uh, what is the difference? Serious question.
 
2013-06-15 05:44:25 AM

TheJoe03: Uh, what is the difference? Serious question.


All of the academic studies I found were behind pay walls unfortunately.  This science blog link has a decent breakdown with relevant sources.

"Visceral fat is composed of several adipose depots which may contribute insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia, hypertension and coronary artery disease (NIH)."

It still isn't clear whether it is the fat itself that is the problem or if it is just a very highly correlated marker of the underlying organ diseases that actually kill you.  But either way, if you have it you have a much higher risk of cardiopulmonary disease than someone with equal amounts of subcutaneous (jiggly) fat.
 
2013-06-15 01:29:05 PM
Never had a beer gut. I had a food gut. Decided I didn't want to be fat, anymore. Dropped 60 lbs in the last year.

A beer gut is more properly called a calorie gut.
 
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