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(MSN)   How I dug out of $80,000 in debt. Step #1: Start by saving even just $5 a month somehow   (money.msn.com) divider line 221
    More: Interesting, Married... with Children, SmartMoney, young professional  
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15062 clicks; posted to Main » on 13 Jun 2013 at 6:01 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-06-13 06:54:11 PM

Summercat: doglover: SevenizGud: Eating out is the #1 money waster for most people.

You fuggin come to my house and cook for me then mr judgemental.

I have two 8am-11pm days and work Saturday mornings. There's usually not enough time in the day and energy in my body left to cook anything worth eating at home and clean up the mess. So I eat out.

Also, don't know the last time you went grocery shopping, but most of my good meals come out to the same price as something cheap from take out as well.

So the real choice is between paying $10 for lunch with clean up or $10.50 for lunch with no cleanup.

Cook a bunch of food all at once. The time to cook 10 servings of pasta is only marginally more than 1 servings. Same thing for sauce; making 10 servings requires a larger pot than a single serving of sauce, and does take more time, but we're talking about maybe a quarter to half an hour.

When I used to work overnight as a security guard, I couldn't leave site to get food, not that there was any available. I had a microwave and a minifridge. Tortillas, guacamole, cheese, and chopped chicken (purchased at El Polo Loco in a single serving), spread it, nuke it, eat it; it's a full meal in of itself, and each instance of it cost like 2.50.

Unless food prices at national chains is omgwtf lower in suburban Southern California than other places, this isn't all that not doable.

/The tortillas could have been cheaper but I was using high-fiber-low-carb tortillas.


Eating at home can be far cheaper than even the cheapest fast food if you have knowledge and don't live in a food desert. In these threads there are usually people going on about how it just can't be done, they usually lack the knowledge.
 
2013-06-13 06:55:36 PM

shooteneq1: your math sucks then. I payed my truck off over 5 years ago and we bought my wifes car around the same time with cash. In the past 5 years we have spent $3100 on repairs between both vehicles. That 3100 also includes oil changes for 5 years. that averages out to only $51 a month for TWO vehicles and included general maintenance. Not to mention our car insurance is significantly cheaper with 2 vehicles that are both over 10 years old vs a new car. The cost of a new car vs used it way more than the $300 a month you claim it is. Not to mention all the money i am saving on those payments is going into my kids college fund and our retirement.


Disclaimer: I am 6'4" with a tall torso.  When I buy cars, I don't get to say "Which car is cheapest?," I get to say "Which car do I fit in and it costs HOW MUCH *faint*" (And gets WHAT MPG *faint again*).

New Car:  $400/month payment (for 5 years), $225/month insurance, 18 MPG, 7/70K warranty
Old Car with 100K miles: $250/month payment (for 4 years), $125/month insurance, 16 MPG, no warranty.
 
2013-06-13 06:57:28 PM

jst3p: meyerkev: Pray 4 Mojo: meyerkev: I blew a head seal

Are you sure it wasn't just ice cream?

That was Dad's car, but yes.

Car started smoking, we poured about 2 gallons of water into the radiator, got the heck out of Detroit, poured another 5 gallons of water in over the course of the drive home, and Dad got a nice $5000 repair bill after he took it up to the mechanic (or in his case, he said "Fark this noise", went up and dropped $9K on a nice used Camry pre-Cash for Clunkers)

I blew a seal once. I am never allowed back at the Denver Zoo.


I blew a tranny once.
 
2013-06-13 06:57:48 PM
Lottery tickets
 
2013-06-13 07:01:51 PM

dchurch0: YAY! It's this thread again!

I used to like reading the personal finance threads when I first joined Fark and started caring about my monthly income and expenses. Now I just find them repetitive.


Look, n00b, maybe there are other, newer people who have only recently come to Fark that are now enjoying these types of threads, ones that to them aren't repetitive.  If you find the need to go into threads just to complain that they exist, it might be time to step away from the keyboard, dust off the Cheetos crumbs and go outside.
 
2013-06-13 07:02:10 PM
Is this the thread where I mention I've paid down about $200k of mortgage debt in the last two years and I still have enough left over to feed premium to my Mercedes SUV and spend a month in Europe this summer?
 
2013-06-13 07:02:16 PM

jst3p: Eating at home can be far cheaper than even the cheapest fast food if you have knowledge and don't live in a food desert. In these threads there are usually people going on about how it just can't be done, they usually lack the knowledge.


Eating at home works out about the same for me. However... since I'm fat, single, have money, don't make a list, don't like being in the store and don't have a lot of self discipline about what I eat... I spend a ridiculous amount of money on groceries.

My personal experience would prove that you can eat significantly cheaper at home... if you're smart about it.
 
2013-06-13 07:06:57 PM
Car payments are for suckers. Most of the cost of a car is in the goofy electronics and "appointments". Learn to like cloth interior, manual transmissions and realize you don't need a big, fancy car. There's nothing sexier than a man living below his means. No one's impressed by a new Jetta, anyway, so don't bother trying.
 
2013-06-13 07:10:40 PM

mccallcl: Car payments are for suckers. Most of the cost of a car is in the goofy electronics and "appointments". Learn to like cloth interior, manual transmissions and realize you don't need a big, fancy car. There's nothing sexier than a man living below his means. No one's impressed by a new Jetta, anyway, so don't bother trying.


What if leather, navigation, heated seats, power moonroof and 4 zone climate control are still below our means?
 
2013-06-13 07:11:37 PM
It's very doable on a middle-class salary. Just cut expenses - really, you DON'T need cable, and if you are serious you will not have a car unless it's cheaper than living near work/public transit. If you make $40k, you can probably live on $30k or less and put away/pay off $10k+ a year. If you make $50k or more? Then it's all gravy. Honestly, if you apply yourself you can retire early.

That said, there is an absolute limit to cutting expenses. Even if you are careful, you still need to buy (cheap grocery store) food and pay rent (for the apartment you share with your roommate or roommates). If you make $25k, cutting expenses down to $15k a year is very hard, and if you make $20k you can forget about cutting expenses to $10k. If your pay barely cuts it, you're screwed.

At $5 a month, assuming no interest, it would take over a thousand years to pay off $80k. Sorry.
 
2013-06-13 07:14:55 PM

adamatari: It's very doable on a middle-class salary. Just cut expenses - really, you DON'T need cable, and if you are serious you will not have a car unless it's cheaper than living near work/public transit. If you make $40k, you can probably live on $30k or less and put away/pay off $10k+ a year. If you make $50k or more? Then it's all gravy. Honestly, if you apply yourself you can retire early.

That said, there is an absolute limit to cutting expenses. Even if you are careful, you still need to buy (cheap grocery store) food and pay rent (for the apartment you share with your roommate or roommates). If you make $25k, cutting expenses down to $15k a year is very hard, and if you make $20k you can forget about cutting expenses to $10k. If your pay barely cuts it, you're screwed.

At $5 a month, assuming no interest, it would take over a thousand years to pay off $80k. Sorry.


Something that changed my life, but old advice that not enough people do:

Take 10% of take home pay and send it to an online account the day you get paid. You learn to do without it when it isn't in your account and it adds up. I have emptied mine a few times (I have other investment and savings vehicles) for down payment for house or other things I have deemed reasonable but it is nice to have the cushion. The trick is to keep it ~3days away via transfer. Makes you really think "do I transfer it or get by?"
 
2013-06-13 07:17:33 PM

whistleridge: Let me guess:

1. Cut rent as much as possible, either by moving in with parents or with 8 roommates
2. Don't eat out, and eat rice and beans at home
3. Work 80 hours a week, probably including nights and weekends
4. Don't have a car payment, cell phone contract, or any other big ticket expenses
5. Kiss all entertainment and new purchases goodbye
6. Oh...and one of those 2-3 jobs will need to pay significantly more than minimum wage

/ at the end of the day, it's really just about #6


#4 is really the one where you can start socking away some serious money.  I switched from Sprint to Virgin Mobile and cut my phone bill by almost $100 a month.   No car payment, no cable bill, stopped eating out and going to movies every week / every other week, I was able to free up 500-600 a month.
 
2013-06-13 07:20:32 PM

whistleridge: 6. Oh...and one of those 2-3 jobs will need to pay significantly more than minimum wage

/ at the end of the day, it's really just about #6


6. is a fair assumption, however, if you're talking about paying of a huge student debt.  If you have a college loan, then you had the opportunity to acquire valuable and marketable skills.

After all, your loan debt is supposed to be related to your expected take-home pay, so that you can pay it off in the time alloted.  If you borrow enough to pay off in 10 years with 15% of your take-home pay, then you can kill that amount in 3 years with more like 40% of your take-home pay---severe, but doable by drastic measures.
 
2013-06-13 07:26:00 PM
We were 32k in credit card debt. I played the CC companies against each other. When I got an offer for 0% for a year I'd sign up and transfer over as much as possible. Make minimum payments on that one and pay as much as possible on the ones with high percentages. Those debts were quickly obliterated. Repeat until paid off. Took about 4 years.

No we didn't live extravagantly back then. We drove clunkers and had higher paying jobs than we do now. When money was tight we'd have to use the credit cards on groceries. Stupid, but you do what you have to do. It gets away from you faster than you think it will.

Didn't ruin my credit either (not that that's ever really come in handy anyway). It's 846.
 
2013-06-13 07:29:31 PM

Devo: Don't carry a balance on your credit cards.


Don't have credit cards. I've not had any for 20 years, and it's been a huge relief since my student loans came due. One less problem...
 
2013-06-13 07:29:35 PM
1)  Don't get $80000 in debt unless it's a mortgage or student loans for a PhD in something that pays.

I consider myself in financial emergency mode right now because my expenses are exceeding my income, even though I have decent enough savings to get by until hopefully I actually get a raise next year after 3 years of negative take-home pay growth (and that's before inflation.)  The idea that there are large numbers of people who carry high-interest debt in "normal" circumstances is completely insane.  The idea that they blame their creditors for offering them that credit is even more insane.
 
2013-06-13 07:33:30 PM
Pretty soon he made it to assistant manager, and that's where the big bucks were.
 
2013-06-13 07:36:51 PM

trappedspirit: dchurch0: YAY! It's this thread again!

I used to like reading the personal finance threads when I first joined Fark and started caring about my monthly income and expenses. Now I just find them repetitive.

you sound...like you got a raise


To be fair, I did. I read a lot of these types of threads and took a lot of mental notes. I now live in a low cost of living area (Western Nebraska) and make about $80K a year. The only debts I have are the mortgage and the car payment, so money is not really a worry of mine anymore.
 
2013-06-13 07:37:07 PM

Gyrfalcon: Devo: Don't carry a balance on your credit cards.

Don't have credit cards. I've not had any for 20 years, and it's been a huge relief since my student loans came due. One less problem...


Agreed... but... can't it's really hard to get credit w/out credit cards. It's a farking smarmy system.

I grudgingly have one for that reason. I use it to buy gas and groceries... and autopay it twice a month (on paydays).
 
2013-06-13 07:37:24 PM
dustman81:
You don't need a brand new car (with the attached car payment). Get a good used car
You don't need the unlimited everything iPhone 5 plan. Get a Tracfone
You don't need the cable package with every premium channel on the planet. Get an antenna

Those three alone will save you at least $500 a month.


This. I see people all the time with a good job and substantial paycheck who never have any money because they piss their paycheck away on shiat that they do not need and can't really afford.
 
2013-06-13 07:38:03 PM
LDM90:   No we didn't live extravagantly back then. We drove clunkers and had higher paying jobs than we do now. When money was tight we'd have to use the credit cards on groceries. Stupid, but you do what you have to do. It gets away from you faster than you think it will.

Didn't ruin my credit either (not that that's ever really come in handy anyway). It's 846.



Let me get this straight.  I pay everything on time.  I own a house. I have zero LT debts except the mortgage. But my sins was I was late for a credit card and school loan payment 6 years ago (due to moving and missing the bill - admittedly it was a few months before I settled up in full).  And worse I recently lived overseas for 4 years where I didn't use any credit cards at all.

But yet, I have a lower credit score than you and am occassionally considered a credit risk.

I guess that makes sense?
 
2013-06-13 07:39:25 PM

timujin: dchurch0: YAY! It's this thread again!

I used to like reading the personal finance threads when I first joined Fark and started caring about my monthly income and expenses. Now I just find them repetitive.

Look, n00b, maybe there are other, newer people who have only recently come to Fark that are now enjoying these types of threads, ones that to them aren't repetitive.  If you find the need to go into threads just to complain that they exist, it might be time to step away from the keyboard, dust off the Cheetos crumbs and go outside.


Point taken. Sorry for being a d-bag.

I still do enjoy reading threads on Fark, even these types. I have learned a lot in the threads here, and applied a lot of the insight gained to my own life. I'm better off for it. I didn't mean to threadshiat.

/They are Doritos crumbs
//Just came in from outside (yardwork)
///Slashies come in threes
 
2013-06-13 07:39:29 PM

Gyrfalcon: Don't have credit cards. I've not had any for 20 years, and it's been a huge relief since my student loans came due. One less problem.


"Don't have guns, so you don't shoot yourself in the leg with them.  One less problem"

"Don't have a motorcycle, so you don't hit a curb at 140mph.  One less problem"

"Don't have scissors, so you don't cut your finger off.  One less problem"
 
2013-06-13 07:40:26 PM

BMFPitt: The idea that there are large numbers of people who carry high-interest debt in "normal" circumstances is completely insane. The idea that they blame their creditors for offering them that credit is even more insane.


That's another important guideline for paying off debt:  don't blame the system.  Even if the system has cheated you, that attitude makes it easier to give up, or to regard your debt as something inescapable and beyond your control.

One of the easiest ways to never dig out of debt is to start on day 1 with the indignant insistence that it's not possible.  The only challenge is occasionally encountering people who do pay off their debt, but if you encounter them on the Internet you can claim the story is bullshiat written by a paid shill.
 
2013-06-13 07:40:28 PM
Two things that make a chump out of a man:
1) Car payments
2) pussy
 
2013-06-13 07:42:46 PM
SirEattonHogg:
I guess that makes sense?

Simple: it doesn't, credit scores are bullshiat and (nearly)everybody who uses them knows it but they're convenient for lenders.
 
2013-06-13 07:43:02 PM

dchurch0: The only debts I have are the mortgage and the car payment, so money is not really a worry of mine anymore.


Isn't being a grownup just farking awesome?
 
2013-06-13 07:47:59 PM

Pray 4 Mojo: dchurch0: The only debts I have are the mortgage and the car payment, so money is not really a worry of mine anymore.

Isn't being a grownup just farking awesome?


And how!
 
2013-06-13 07:51:39 PM

Voiceofreason01: Simple: it doesn't, credit scores are bullshiat and (nearly)everybody who uses them knows it but they're convenient for lenders.


You should come up with a system that can more accurately predict the credit risk of strangers, then.

You'll make billions.
 
2013-06-13 07:52:36 PM

meyerkev: dustman81:You don't need a brand new car (with the attached car payment). Get a good used car
You don't need the unlimited everything iPhone 5 plan. Get a Tracfone
You don't need the cable package with every premium channel on the planet. Get an antenna

Those three alone will save you at least $500 a month.

Doing these in reverse.

#3) Maybe.  Dad did the antenna thing for a bit, got annoyed at not getting certain channels (like ABC and Fox), and picked up super-basic cable for $30/month.
#2) Yup.  Also, if you must have a smartphone, see if you can mooch off family. Picking up $60 to add an extra line to the family plan is WAY cheaper than $120 for your own plan.  (Or heck, if work requires a smartphone, see if you can get them to pay for it or at least make it tax-deductible)
#1) Maybe.  I did the math once, and having a new car with sweet warranty was about $300/month more (including fark-you 20-year old new car insurance) than the used car IF nothing broke.  It may be worth $300/month to have the certainty of never going "Whoops, I blew a head seal and now I'm out 5 grand."


I was going to say pretty much the same thing. Of course you don't need any of those things. You also don't *need* to eat anything but ramen noodles and cereal, either. But I bet you'd be hard pressed to find some who actually is willing to do that.

It's all about the second job. Or, in my case, winning multi million dollar settlements.

/maybe law school wasn't such a bad idea.
 
2013-06-13 07:55:47 PM

BMFPitt: Voiceofreason01: Simple: it doesn't, credit scores are bullshiat and (nearly)everybody who uses them knows it but they're convenient for lenders.

You should come up with a system that can more accurately predict the credit risk of strangers, then.

You'll make billions.


There are better ways to determine credit worthiness but they're difficult to automate. That's why reputable lenders(banks) ask for more than just your name and SS# when you apply for a loan.
 
2013-06-13 08:00:11 PM

Pray 4 Mojo: What if leather, navigation, heated seats, power moonroof and 4 zone climate control are still below our means?

 Go for it, grandma.
 
2013-06-13 08:00:51 PM

2 Replies: Save $5 a month... then in 1333 years you'll be debt free!
ಠ_ಠ


You're forgetting the interest you'd be paying on it over those 1333 years.
 
2013-06-13 08:04:22 PM
step 1. pass regulations limiting usurious interest rates.
step 2. make the minimum wage a realistic number, that allows one to live in reasonable dignity and comfort.
step 3. make student debt dispellable in bankruptcy.
 
2013-06-13 08:07:35 PM

Gyrfalcon: Devo: Don't carry a balance on your credit cards.

Don't have credit cards. I've not had any for 20 years, and it's been a huge relief since my student loans came due. One less problem...


Nope. Devo was correct. You can get 1-3% cash back on everything and build a credit score which can be useful for things besides taking out loans, like renting an apartment. As long as you just use it as if it were cash and not "woo, free money," you come out ahead by having one.
 
2013-06-13 08:08:05 PM
I think that the best advice in this thread is not to rack up $80k in debt if you don't have the income to service it.

I know that "fark happens," but $80k is a lot of fark.

I have a friend that got into financial trouble when we were roommates.  He was cruising along just fine and he had a fairly small unexpected expense (A few hundred dollars).  Granted, we had very small incomes back then, so a few hundred bucks felt significant.  However, once he had a credit card balance he couldn't pay in full it was like he'd broken the seal on having credit card debt.  His debt quickly ballooned until he was in a really bad spot (and wrecked his credit in the process).

I wonder about the psychology of what happened.  He was (somewhat) responsible with money until he had a bit of unsecured debt.  Then when he had a small credit card bill he couldn't pay it's as though he decided that if he's going to have a balance he didn't care how big it was.

That's why I think that even a little debt is a really bad thing.  For a lot of people it really is a slippery slope.
 
2013-06-13 08:21:06 PM

ripple123: step 1. pass regulations limiting usurious interest rates.
step 2. make the minimum wage a realistic number, that allows one to live in reasonable dignity and comfort.
step 3. make student debt dispellable in bankruptcy.


The minimum wage should be ONE MILLION DOLLARS A MINUTE!


/You people are farking idiots.
/Have you thought about how minimum wages affect prices of goods and services?
/The poor were meant to be poor
//In addition poor people smell funny.
 
2013-06-13 08:26:42 PM
I'm a little suspicious since the article was basically lacking in details.  Since part of his $80K in debt was credit cards then interest actually put it over $80K, unless the $80K included the interest.  Saving $80K in 3 years not easy unless he was pulling in good money to start with.
 
2013-06-13 08:29:14 PM

dchurch0: timujin: dchurch0: YAY! It's this thread again!

I used to like reading the personal finance threads when I first joined Fark and started caring about my monthly income and expenses. Now I just find them repetitive.

Look, n00b, maybe there are other, newer people who have only recently come to Fark that are now enjoying these types of threads, ones that to them aren't repetitive.  If you find the need to go into threads just to complain that they exist, it might be time to step away from the keyboard, dust off the Cheetos crumbs and go outside.

Point taken. Sorry for being a d-bag.

I still do enjoy reading threads on Fark, even these types. I have learned a lot in the threads here, and applied a lot of the insight gained to my own life. I'm better off for it. I didn't mean to threadshiat.

/They are Doritos crumbs
//Just came in from outside (yardwork)
///Slashies come in threes


all good, I just like to look for reasons to call someone n00b... makes me feel all tingly inside.
 
2013-06-13 08:30:29 PM

Propain_az: ripple123: step 1. pass regulations limiting usurious interest rates.
step 2. make the minimum wage a realistic number, that allows one to live in reasonable dignity and comfort.
step 3. make student debt dispellable in bankruptcy.

The minimum wage should be ONE MILLION DOLLARS A MINUTE!


/You people are farking idiots.
/Have you thought about how minimum wages affect prices of goods and services?
/The poor were meant to be poor
//In addition poor people smell funny.


The minimum wage should be zero! Then goods and services will be free!

/Wait, what do you mean it's more nuanced than that?
 
2013-06-13 08:31:22 PM
"My dad is a saver, but my mom is a spender. She used credit cards and just bought the things she wanted. In a lot of marriages, I think the woman's personality ends up winning out. I did what my mom did rather than what my dad said."

Well, duh.  Let that be a lesson and just stay the hell away from women or you'll find yourself back in that spot.
 
2013-06-13 08:31:24 PM
credit card and student loan debt.

Also known as "the two easiest types of debt to defer, refinance, and get out from under".

Call me when he's behind on car payments or has unpaid house payments/back rent, or had his mortgage or a fully-owned business go underwater and magically recovers in three years.  For CC debt and student loans that's not impressive, particularly, basic common sense will get you through that.
 
2013-06-13 08:33:45 PM

ripple123: step 1. pass regulations limiting usurious interest rates.
step 2. make the minimum wage a realistic number, that allows one to live in reasonable dignity and comfort.
step 3. make student debt dispellable in bankruptcy.


rolls eyes
 
2013-06-13 08:36:04 PM

Propain_az: ripple123: step 1. pass regulations limiting usurious interest rates.
step 2. make the minimum wage a realistic number, that allows one to live in reasonable dignity and comfort.
step 3. make student debt dispellable in bankruptcy.

The minimum wage should be ONE MILLION DOLLARS A MINUTE!


/You people are farking idiots.
/Have you thought about how minimum wages affect prices of goods and services?
/The poor were meant to be poor
//In addition poor people smell funny.


Look closely in his eyes, you'll see Supply-Side Jesus staring back at you

/or was that Republican Jesus
//NRA Jesus?
///.........Conservipedia Jesus?!
 
2013-06-13 08:37:02 PM
"My wife -- my girlfriend at the time -- knew about it."

Never mind.  It's too late now.  You're farked.
 
2013-06-13 08:39:12 PM

What_do_you_want_now: Propain_az: ripple123: step 1. pass regulations limiting usurious interest rates.
step 2. make the minimum wage a realistic number, that allows one to live in reasonable dignity and comfort.
step 3. make student debt dispellable in bankruptcy.

The minimum wage should be ONE MILLION DOLLARS A MINUTE!


/You people are farking idiots.
/Have you thought about how minimum wages affect prices of goods and services?
/The poor were meant to be poor
//In addition poor people smell funny.

Look closely in his eyes, you'll see Supply-Side Jesus staring back at you

/or was that Republican Jesus
//NRA Jesus?
///.........Conservipedia Jesus?!


NRA
 
2013-06-13 08:39:35 PM
CSB: I came out of college with $40k in student loans and paid it off in two years on a $40k net salary.

Getting ahead is all about biting the bullet and living well below your usual means - even if it's just for a little while. No credit cards, no mortgage, no car payments, no television, no cell phone, no electronics, no traveling, no parties, no booze, and no girlfriends. I went out for lunch every day and still managed to build up a $10k cash reserve over that period. Had I made my own lunches, that reserve probably would've been more like $15k.

/still haven't figured out what to do with the left over income yet.
//yes, I have a retirement fund.
///no, I'm not feeling charitable.
 
2013-06-13 08:43:42 PM
whistleridge:  . .   you maybe considered NOT being an asshole ex husband, and becoming a miserable deadbeat sonofabiatch asshole ex husband instead? Either way you suck, but at least with one of them you get to keep your money...

an old Eye-talian miser actually told me that once, "If you are going to be called a Son of a biatch either way, you might as well be the Son of a biatch with the money".
 
2013-06-13 08:44:39 PM
VoiceofReason01:
Simple: it doesn't, credit scores are bullshiat and (nearly)everybody who uses them knows it but they're convenient for lenders.

Yes, and it drives our consumerist economy.  God forbid you don't play their stupid game and spend.
 
2013-06-13 08:47:29 PM

screwzloos: CSB: I came out of college with $40k in student loans and paid it off in two years on a $40k net salary.

Getting ahead is all about biting the bullet and living well below your usual means - even if it's just for a little while.


No, it's about getting a $40k/year net salary (if that's net then you're talking $50k/year gross plus you probably have health care) and being lucky enough to have no health problems to speak of.
 
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