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(Some Food Nut)   Fark Food Thread: Cooking for yourself or your friends and family where allergies are a concern? Are peanuts, wheat glutens, or other modern horrors part of your routine to avoid? Show us the recipes and help farkers avoid adverse reactions:   (tescohealthandwellbeing.com) divider line 17
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765 clicks; posted to Main » on 13 Jun 2013 at 5:00 PM (43 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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Archived thread
2013-06-13 01:47:18 PM
4 votes:
peanut, gluten and lactose intolerant people are all just pansies that need to be culled from the herd
2013-06-13 04:46:08 PM
3 votes:

mysticcat: Bunny Deville: Wow, half the people in here are violating Wheaton's law in a way I have rarely before seen.

I suppose my son bleeding from his intestines because of his milk allergy is just him being a whiny, self obsessed, self diagnosed pansy?
When he was two weeks old?
Was it my imagination that this bleeding occurred, or maybe a practicing physician told me? Hmm?
Anyway.

When making food for people with milk allergies, Smart Balance Light buttery spread has no milk in it. My kid loves it.

Egg allergies: substitute coconut oil for eggs when baking. I often do this anyway, it makes the cakes much more delicious.

And you Wheaton's Law violators need to get a better farking hobby.

Not trying to be a jerk, but was your child tested?


Yes, several times. They tested his stool twice, both times it came back positive for occult blood. He had severe vomiting, breathing issues, and failure to thrive for three months because no one believed it was allergies, which is why I have little patience with those who dismiss them. He had an endoscopy, was put on three different medications that didn't work, had several breathing treatments, and was diagnosed with everything from laryngomalacia to reflux before someone finally figured out what was wrong. I had to quit eating dairy and several other foods so I could continue to nurse him. 18 months was the earliest they could scratch test him, it came back positive for seven different food allergies. He had another scratch test at 4, which came back positive only for dairy. The same guy scratch tested him, and said kids often grow out of the milder allergies, but we don't know about milk. We're testing again this month.

If you had to stay up all night because your baby could barely breathe, if you had to clean up projectile vomit every two hours, if you had to take your baby to the doctor twice a week and subject him to an endoscopy at one month old, and the whole time you kept asking if it could be allergies, AND EVERYONE WAS farkING DISMISSIVE OF YOU AND TOLD YOU YOU WERE PARANOID, only to find out that yes, in fact, it was farking food allergies, and they almost killed your infant, you'd be short on patience with this issue as well.

His father and grandfather have the same allergies, only not as severe.

The problem is not misdiagnosis. The problem is that, like autism, it's now being diagnosed correctly.

It certainly wasn't about getting attention. I had to send my daughter, who was two, away from home for almost a month because I seriously thought my son was going to die, and I couldn't drag her around from doctor to doctor to procedure to hospital stay to doctor with me. my baby was dying, and I was helpless. My mother kept telling me not to get attached. It was that bad. Since then, I have watched other moms go through the exact same thing. No one believes them. You have to understand, a hundred years ago these kids would have died. It was an accepted part of life. Now they can be saved, and pass on the allergies to their own kids, as my father in law passed them down to my husband and son.

People getting on a message board and crowing about how fake allergies are isn't helping anyone. It's just making people look like unfeeling, ignorant jackasses.
2013-06-13 01:52:44 PM
2 votes:
i have a wheat allergy. there is still a shiatload of stuff i can eat. i'm not a biatch about going over to friends' houses. i will find something to eat without making a stink about it.
2013-06-13 11:44:53 PM
1 votes:

kabar: Oh look, it's this thread again.  The one where somehow, 25% of the US miraculously contracted celiac disease within the last 3 years.


Wheat sensitivity (which people often think is gluten sensitivity) is not due to a miraculous increase in celiac disease.  It is due to the genetic mutation of wheat.  What we call wheat is not wheat.  The wheat grown now contains a protein that ALL people are sensitive too.  Some of us just have healthy enough bodies to let us know there is a problem.  The rest of you dumbf*ks are running on Big Macs and Doritos and your system is so plugged up with trans fats and msg that you wouldn't know a food sensitivity if it hit you in your fat face.

Just because you're too dumb to understand it doesn't mean it doesn't exist.
2013-06-13 07:27:56 PM
1 votes:

Skywolf the Scribbler: So here's a tough one: suppose you and some buddies want to throw a BBQ, and some vegan friends who are very offended at the concept of eating meat want to be part of things, but don't want anything to do with a BBQ? Is there any way to Shatner out of that situation, or do you just have to request to your offended friends that they join other festivities later on?

/This would be a fine fake Dear Abby letter


Just straight up tell them it's going to be a BBQ because that's what you guys want to do this time, and that they are welcome to come later after the meat cooking has died down, but otherwise, it'll be up to them what they want to do.  If they're that uncomfortable seeing people eat meat, they'll just have to skip, and if you're worried about your relationship with them you can have a different party/soiree/drink-'em-up later that better fits them.  But if they're so sensitive and prissy that they can't handle other people's personal choices, they're probably going to be unhappy about a lot more than just your party.
Some people like to be martyrs and be all up in everyone else's business--be it religion, sex, food stuff, politics, the kind of car/computer/phone/pet/shoes--and nothing is going to stop them.  I've been a vegetarian for years, but I certainly don't expect other people to change themselves for me, nor do I make a big deal about it (except for the time a former boss ordered pizza for the office, and every single pie was full-on meat-lovers, not even one cheese pizza; the muslim guy and I had a great time out at lunch together that day, after we both just kind of stared at boss and said "what is wrong with you?").
2013-06-13 05:47:42 PM
1 votes:
My perfect, allergy free genetics mock your overly sensitive physiology.
2013-06-13 05:42:56 PM
1 votes:
There is a big difference between regular allergies, food intolerance, and anaphylactic reactions such as peanut allergy.  Most people when they hear peanut allergy, they think it is just discomfort, or makes us a little sick.  What actually happens is that all of the soft tissue in you body swells within just a few seconds, including your lung vessels, respiratory passages, and so on.  So while the issue may be a big joke to most of you, it has put me in the the ICU with machines breathing for me for a week twice already.  So yes, if I had a kid with anaphylactic allergies to any food item, you bet I would do my best to make sure they wouldn't go through what I've been through.

And no, it isn't just a matter of "don't eat peanuts then".  I can have the reaction if I come in contact with something that has come in contact with peanuts.

And no, it is not about kids today being shielded from everything.  I grew-up in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil in the 1960's & 70s, and my family had a farm.  I used to swim in highly polluted waters in the big city, and run through cow & horse dung infested fields barefoot at the farm.  And I didn't develop peanut allergy until I was in my 40's and living in NYC.

And for those who say people with anaphylaxis "need to be culled from the herd", fark you.  With a pineapple.
2013-06-13 05:39:18 PM
1 votes:

mysticcat: Bunny Deville: mysticcat: Bunny Deville: Wow, half the people in here are violating Wheaton's law in a way I have rarely before seen.

I suppose my son bleeding from his intestines because of his milk allergy is just him being a whiny, self obsessed, self diagnosed pansy?
When he was two weeks old?
Was it my imagination that this bleeding occurred, or maybe a practicing physician told me? Hmm?
Anyway.

When making food for people with milk allergies, Smart Balance Light buttery spread has no milk in it. My kid loves it.

Egg allergies: substitute coconut oil for eggs when baking. I often do this anyway, it makes the cakes much more delicious.

And you Wheaton's Law violators need to get a better farking hobby.

Not trying to be a jerk, but was your child tested?

Yes, several times. They tested his stool twice, both times it came back positive for occult blood. He had severe vomiting, breathing issues, and failure to thrive for three months because no one believed it was allergies.....

Not sure why someone would say you couldn't test until 18 mos old.  We routinely test infants with GI symptoms, malabsorption, FTT, etc  for food allergies .

Unfortunately, for every real food allergy there are lots of misdiagnoses and simple poseurs.


I agree about the poseurs. I have a good friend who won't let her kids eat gluten, although there is no documented medical reason for it. My husband actually is gluten intolerant. He still eats gluten. He figures it doesn't mess with him enough to matter, even though his tests came back positive for the intolerance.

The clinic we went to in South Carolina wouldn't skin test my son until he was 12 months, but we moved right before his birthday and didn't have insurance until he was 18 months. I don't have anything good to say about that clinic.

I spent a lot of time in Sedona, AZ, where every single person there had some type of food that they wouldn't eat for health reasons. I get just as sick of that as anyone else. But I get even sicker of people being flippant about the reality of allergies. And I'm glad that my son is sitting next to me right now, badgering me about getting him the new Smash Brothers, instead of in a hole in the ground, because things were pretty goddamned iffy with him for a while.
2013-06-13 05:31:04 PM
1 votes:

GrahamManning: peanut, gluten and lactose intolerant people are all just pansies defective dna that need to be culled from the herd

-=-
They may not be pansies and beat your ass for saying so..., or perhaps I like pansies..., so I FTFY.

Well, I get headaches from peanut butter and some spices, but I didn't have any spawn to pollute the well.
(You're welcome.)
2013-06-13 05:24:02 PM
1 votes:
"Gluten free".   To truly protect your allergy suffering friends and family, wash the pans/utensils/dishes that will be used for gluten free cooking more than once before use.   This is extremely important and often underestimated by people doing 'gluten free'.    Don't bake in the same kitchen used to prepare gluten foods for several hours (gluten can be microscopic and still cause serious reactions).

Peanut.   Give up Thai food from restaurants , learn to make you own.  Same with Burmese.   Most Asian restaurants are family businesses, and you just can't trust them to not cross-contaminate ingredients.   Five trips might be ok--but trip #6 could cause an event.    Organic Almond Butter can be better than peanut butter.  It's also 3X pricier.   They claim that boiled peanuts removes the oils that cause the reactions.   Peanut kicks me around and steals my wallet every time we meet up, so I have not tried this.

Soy.   This one is surprisingly hard, because it's a filler in everything these days in USA. Read the labels on everything.

Wheat:   Keep the benadryl handy.   A 'rescue dose' is apparently 3-4x a normal over the counter dosage.   Consult your allergist.

Coconut.   This one is rare, and so it's not generally bold faced or listed in allergy warning labels.  Sometimes falls under 'natural flavors'.   Hard to avoid.

Vinegar.   No wine.   No ketchup, mustard, mayo, etc.   Vinegar is in tons of things as a natural preservative.   Lemon juice is a good substitute to make your own stuff with, it can be diluted to minimize the lemon flavor.

Chocolate:   You're doomed, hold out as long as you can.

Inevitably, there will be issues.   If you need an epi pen, keep one in the car, one in the kitchen, and possibly carry one with you at all times.   A 'rescue dose' of some other medicine (consult your allergist) is a good idea to have around as well.   Learn to pay attention to yourself, and the signs that you are having an event.   Don't wait for it to get 'really bad' before taking action.
2013-06-13 05:05:54 PM
1 votes:
I have pretty severe allergies to nuts and shellfish.  I don't care what people make at a party, as long as they don't mind that I ask what is in anything questionable.

I kinda prefer that people DON'T try to cook around my allergies, because they can get weird about it.  "HERE, TRY THIS DIP, THERE'S NOTHING YOU'RE ALLERGIC TO IN IT."
2013-06-13 02:53:27 PM
1 votes:
Celiac disease (gluten) is nasty, but it is not an allergy.  Many people who are "gluten-free" have no evidence of celiac disease and are just being trendy.

Peanut allergy can be deadly.  For real.  Somewhere around 80% of people who carry a diagnosis of peanut allergy are not peanut allergic.

She cannot digest meat from hooved animals (i.e. no beef, pork, mutton/lamb, venison) -That's really odd.  Does she have alpha-gal sensitivity?

/Board Certified Allergist
2013-06-13 01:55:35 PM
1 votes:
Let them bring their own food. It's their allergy, not mine.
2013-06-13 01:53:34 PM
1 votes:
No one in my immediate family has any food issues, but a close friend who I often cook with was just diagnosed with celiac disease. It's been an interesting challenge - and fun - to experiment with gluten-free options. There's a lot of good recipes out there. Though I have yet to find a gluten-free bread that doesn't suck.
2013-06-13 01:50:01 PM
1 votes:
If I'm making dinner for a friend and that person has dietary or allergy restrictions, I don't make the food that would bad for them.

If I'm making something for a cookout, picnic, pot luck, etc. I tell everyone "don't eat this is you're a whiny little biatch."
2013-06-13 01:48:49 PM
1 votes:
good friend of mine has an actual gluten allergy. have just gotten into cooking for her and man is it a pain...

...but it's a new skill so, can't complain.
2013-06-13 01:48:18 PM
1 votes:
Not so much with the allergies.

My wife, however, is type-1, so I favor two small side dishes (one carb and one uncarb) to just one.
 
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