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(The Daily Beast)   And the winner in the console wars is.... well, it wasn't even close. It's Sony   (thedailybeast.com) divider line 205
    More: Obvious, console wars, Xbox, Electronic Entertainment Expo, trade policies, technical writers, system console  
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7838 clicks; posted to Geek » on 13 Jun 2013 at 3:22 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-06-14 10:45:47 AM
Hebalo: I've said it before, but:

1) Farkers are not exactly the "average user". The "average user" doesn't care about trading games (really, who does that anyway?), couldn't care less about whether they have to be connected to the net (I'd wager the VAST majority of current gaming systems are connected 24/7).

The "average user" trades games and gives them as gifts all the time. A high-quality game that's been vetted is an excellent spontaneous gift. As the wife said earlier today, trading and giving games is a kind of social currency in schools and the workplace, creating a bridge of commonality between people who may not have much in common otherwise.

2) The price difference won't matter.

If you have anyone else in your life, I bet you can find a dozen better ways to spend $100 considering that, with the vast majority of games being non-exclusive, there is little difference between the systems. Hell, that's a week's groceries or a month of cable and internet for a lot of families.

3) People keep (wrongly) making the assumption that they are comparing two gaming systems. PS4 is a gaming system. XBONE is an entertainment center, for people who don't want to put together a media PC.

What exactly does the XB1 offer that a PS4/360 combo does not in terms of entertainment options? Will Hulu and Netflix not work unless you have a XB1? Will I not be able to play movies and tv shows from my computer? Is the XB1 the only one that can function as a DVR?

Remember, most people care about their desires being satisfied, not what's under the hood.
 
2013-06-14 10:56:46 AM
It's funny but whilst neither of the two new consoles (three I guess if you count the Wii U) appeal to me at all.  However I'd probably hand over money for something that could emulate a PS1, PS2 & PS3 all official like with Sony 's blessed firmware and such.

Beyond the original 60GB launch batch of PS3 I mean.
 
2013-06-14 11:09:50 AM

AdamK: i think that assumes 3rd parties aren't desperate for more revenue, if given that the hardware is pretty same across both platforms but one has more uptake and therefore more customers to generate revenue - then sony has the advantage over any DRM microsoft might have, on top of the reality xbone might generate less revenue than 360

i agree that PC is the clear beneficiary in all of this, both machines are x86 so porting to PC will become even more commonplace than it already is, Valve also figured out DRM that everybody was okay with years ago, and with a new generation of hardware already coming for PC there's a chance consoles will be just "gap fillers" before they even hit their 2nd year on the market



More consoles means more game sales, yes. But most consoles out there are old ones.
Its going to slow sales of X1 and PS4, dulling the effect of the price difference.

Used game sales are fairly measurable cut into the publishers take, especially on new titles with short shelf lives. Publisher based DRM costs them money and risks pitfalls like the Sim-City disaster. A lack of security slows sales of add-ons and micro transactions.

If Microsoft takes responsibility for all those things, and handles them successfully, its more money in the publishers pockets. More profit creates more interest in taking advantage of things like Kinect or cloud computing.

You end up with a scenario like Apple.   Yes the system costs more to own and operate, but the eco system is stocked more regularly because the stockers get paid more generously.  This keeps a strong customer base over the years.
 
2013-06-14 11:38:58 AM

way south: AdamK: i think that assumes 3rd parties aren't desperate for more revenue, if given that the hardware is pretty same across both platforms but one has more uptake and therefore more customers to generate revenue - then sony has the advantage over any DRM microsoft might have, on top of the reality xbone might generate less revenue than 360

i agree that PC is the clear beneficiary in all of this, both machines are x86 so porting to PC will become even more commonplace than it already is, Valve also figured out DRM that everybody was okay with years ago, and with a new generation of hardware already coming for PC there's a chance consoles will be just "gap fillers" before they even hit their 2nd year on the market


More consoles means more game sales, yes. But most consoles out there are old ones.
Its going to slow sales of X1 and PS4, dulling the effect of the price difference.

Used game sales are fairly measurable cut into the publishers take, especially on new titles with short shelf lives. Publisher based DRM costs them money and risks pitfalls like the Sim-City disaster. A lack of security slows sales of add-ons and micro transactions.

If Microsoft takes responsibility for all those things, and handles them successfully, its more money in the publishers pockets. More profit creates more interest in taking advantage of things like Kinect or cloud computing.

You end up with a scenario like Apple.   Yes the system costs more to own and operate, but the eco system is stocked more regularly because the stockers get paid more generously.  This keeps a strong customer base over the years.


that's taking the publisher viewpoint at face value, used games' effect on profit is fairly minimal because most revenue from new-game purchases is generated in the first month, the reason game discounting has become so common and popular over the last 3 years so soon after a game is released is because there's no revenue to be generated for most games months after release if high prices are retained - as such deep discounts are the only thing driving sales post-mortem and said customers then bring dollars for DLC which is an added benefit

in effect profit off of a game purchase is moot after the game has been on shelves for more than a few months - publishers are realizing they're better off nickle and diming people down the road than trying to get every cent out of the initial game purchase - the popularity of cheaper titles and f2p is also forcing this change in behavior

really the idea of making all of your money off of the initial purchase of a AAA game is mostly dead at this point - partially thanks to game development not getting any cheaper or efficient and publishers being too risk-averse to develop mid-tier projects, the idea that microsoft has "figured it all out" is idealistic at best - making it more difficult to get used games isn't going to fix the issue of games having to be discounted - this is already a reality in PC land where digital is king and used games haven't existed in almost a decade

the fact that this "one system to fix everything" is being rejected by consumers means it's a moot point - DRM isn't worth anything if it brings in less revenue because the entire point if DRM is to preserve revenue and profit, so if Sony garners a bigger userbase then Microsoft's strategy is a bad one
 
2013-06-14 04:14:04 PM
Sony and Nintendo came out on top, Steam is waiting in the wings, Apple planning their attack, Microsoft being the only Keanu on the bench.
 
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