Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Sportsnet)   You know how Canada produces the best goalies in the world? No, you don't know that, because it hasn't been true for years. USA USA   (sportsnet.ca ) divider line
    More: Interesting, goal tender, Corey Crawford, Steve Yzerman, Martin Brodeur, Team Canada, Joel Quenneville, James Reimer, United States  
•       •       •

875 clicks; posted to Sports » on 13 Jun 2013 at 10:59 AM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



24 Comments   (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread
 
2013-06-13 11:04:27 AM  
One interesting question is who will be Canada's goalie at the 2014 Olympics.

Corey Crawford?
Marc-Andre Fleury?
Roberto Luongo?
Martin Brodeur's corpse?

Just amazing that goaltending has morphed into a legitimate weakness for Canada.
 
2013-06-13 11:04:42 AM  
Crawford definitely lent credence to this last night.
 
2013-06-13 11:05:54 AM  
My //sarcasm got eaten in case it wasn't obvious.
 
2013-06-13 11:09:07 AM  
And that is why CHL has banned the drafting of European goalies (at least in the first round or two of the draft).

However, if the NHL decides to go with the smaller pads (and that will cascade down to all other leagues) I wonder how that will affect the big Europeans goalies that rely on size and good positioning vs smaller goalies that are more flexible and quicker.
 
2013-06-13 11:10:50 AM  

RumsfeldsReplacement: One interesting question is who will be Canada's goalie at the 2014 Olympics.


Mike Smith of the Coyotes could have a legitimate shot.
 
2013-06-13 11:19:47 AM  
We've known about our goalie problems for years... I guess if you don't follow hockey this might be news to you.

The saving grace is we just need ONE GUY to step up. It was supposed to be Price but he seems to be declining. Luongo still may be an option, especially if he gets traded before next season and regains whatever Vancouver sucked out of him.

Hopefully we don't have to resort to one of these "one good year" guys...
 
2013-06-13 11:54:34 AM  
There are just four Canadian goalies who played in more than 20 NHL games this year and finished among the top 20 in goals-against average: Crawford, his teammate Ray Emery, Martin Brodeur and Marc-Andre Fleury.

Writer forgot Brian Elliot.
 
2013-06-13 11:58:06 AM  

Milk D: RumsfeldsReplacement: One interesting question is who will be Canada's goalie at the 2014 Olympics.

Mike Smith of the Coyotes could have a legitimate shot.


If Luongo gets moved -- a big if -- and plays well as a number one goalie he's probably at least #2 on Canada's depth chart. He's never been worse than a top 10 NHL goalie, and you can't honestly put any other Canadians in that class -- excepting Crawford though he screams smoke and mirrors to me.

As of today, the depth chart probably goes something like:

Favourites to get picked
- Price
- Crawford
- Luongo
Could be a decent option
- Smith
- Reimer
- Eliott
Will get considered, but shouldn't
- Ward
- Fleury
- Brodeur
Deserves a look, but won't even get an invite to camp
- Dubnyk
- Emery

/ This list is sad
 
2013-06-13 12:01:10 PM  
You can add Holtby to that last category.
 
2013-06-13 12:21:29 PM  

TeamEd: If Luongo gets moved -- a big if -- and plays well as a number one goalie he's probably at least #2 on Canada's depth chart. He's never been worse than a top 10 NHL goalie, and you can't honestly put any other Canadians in that class -- excepting Crawford though he screams smoke and mirrors to me.


Crawford often looks like he scrambles to make saves that other goalies make routinely. But I wonder if that's part of his style. I don't know enough to actually know if this is true, but from my own memory, even though Crawford sometimes gives up soft goals, but he rarely gets beat into wide open nets.

And I wonder if that's because he relies more on his reactions rather than anticipating shots. Someone like Johnathan Quick makes a lot of stonewall saves, but once in a while he'll get caught out of position and someone will have a tap in. Crawford flails around a lot, but is never really out of a play.

It's more nerve wracking because you don't know when he'll misjudge his reaction and give up a 50 footer, whereas when Quick gets beat you know he's beat before the shot even gets away. So Quick "had no chance" and Crawford "should have had that."

No idea if any of that's true, but that's how it seems to me.
 
2013-06-13 12:43:10 PM  

Jubeebee: TeamEd: If Luongo gets moved -- a big if -- and plays well as a number one goalie he's probably at least #2 on Canada's depth chart. He's never been worse than a top 10 NHL goalie, and you can't honestly put any other Canadians in that class -- excepting Crawford though he screams smoke and mirrors to me.

Crawford often looks like he scrambles to make saves that other goalies make routinely. But I wonder if that's part of his style. I don't know enough to actually know if this is true, but from my own memory, even though Crawford sometimes gives up soft goals, but he rarely gets beat into wide open nets.

And I wonder if that's because he relies more on his reactions rather than anticipating shots. Someone like Johnathan Quick makes a lot of stonewall saves, but once in a while he'll get caught out of position and someone will have a tap in. Crawford flails around a lot, but is never really out of a play.

It's more nerve wracking because you don't know when he'll misjudge his reaction and give up a 50 footer, whereas when Quick gets beat you know he's beat before the shot even gets away. So Quick "had no chance" and Crawford "should have had that."

No idea if any of that's true, but that's how it seems to me.


Crawford has a kinda lumbering straight-legged style that reminds me a lot of guys like Ray Emery or Patrick Lalime (probably something to do with his extremely stiff leg pads). It seems to be effective, sure, but he doesn't look like he has anywhere near the agility of elite goalie-athletes like like Rask, Fleury, Quick or Price. To my eye, Crawford seems comparatively slow in every sense... slow to react to the puck on shots (he seems to get beat on a lot of shots that hit his glove-side arm), slow to move laterally, slow to move north-south to cut off the angle and retreat, slow to close the five-hole in the butterfly, slow to get square after going down or losing his balance, etc.

Clearly he makes the first save most of the time. In that he's as good as any Canadian option. But, I'm not confident on his ability on scrambles, one timers and second chance plays. I think you're right that Crawford doesn't often get beat to an open net, but I think you can call that a combination of the Hawks defence being good at preventing those plays and the fact that Crawford plays deep in his net.

/ Regardless, his numbers are excellent and if he keeps it up he deserves a solid look for the Olympic team.
 
2013-06-13 12:51:13 PM  
You mean other countries with equal/larger populations or dedicated national hockey programs are starting to catch up?  I'm shocked, SHOCKED I tell you.
 
2013-06-13 01:10:20 PM  
I'm sure TSN will have a week month long panel about this issue.
 
2013-06-13 01:15:39 PM  
Playing goalie for a Canadian Hockey Team is like being put in right field for little league.
 
2013-06-13 01:43:34 PM  
#NHL14Bobrovsky
#NHL14Bobrovsky
#NHL14Bobrovsky

/oops, sorry, force of habit
 
2013-06-13 02:48:15 PM  

RumsfeldsReplacement: One interesting question is who will be Canada's goalie at the 2014 Olympics.

Corey Crawford?
Marc-Andre Fleury?
Roberto Luongo?
Martin Brodeur's corpse?

Just amazing that goaltending has morphed into a legitimate weakness for Canada.


Please be fleury

/ for the lulz
 
sn0
2013-06-13 04:18:02 PM  

TeamEd: Milk D: RumsfeldsReplacement: One interesting question is who will be Canada's goalie at the 2014 Olympics.

Mike Smith of the Coyotes could have a legitimate shot.

If Luongo gets moved -- a big if -- and plays well as a number one goalie he's probably at least #2 on Canada's depth chart. He's never been worse than a top 10 NHL goalie, and you can't honestly put any other Canadians in that class -- excepting Crawford though he screams smoke and mirrors to me.

As of today, the depth chart probably goes something like:

Favourites to get picked
- Price
- Crawford
- Luongo
Could be a decent option
- Smith
- Reimer
- Eliott
Will get considered, but shouldn't
- Ward
- Fleury
- Brodeur
Deserves a look, but won't even get an invite to camp
- Dubnyk
- Emery

/ This list is sad


I think Ward will be highly considered. (Let's see you stop pucks when Corvo/Faulk are your teams best defensemen.)
 
2013-06-13 04:56:42 PM  
The best goalie in the league isn't from USA or Canada.
 
2013-06-13 07:30:21 PM  
Optimus Reim!
 
2013-06-13 07:33:50 PM  

octopied: The best goalie in the league isn't from USA or Canada.


Yeah but Bobrovsky isn't playing right now, so it's tough to talk about him.
 
2013-06-14 12:24:00 AM  
Goaltending no longer matters. All a goalie has to be is adequate (ie: no unforced errors).

The system in front of him is everything. If you get the best defense, the best shot blockers, the best face off specialists and the best special teams, the goalie will never see a serious scoring chance all game long. He will see weak outside low percentage shots that he will save 99 times out of 100.

Goaltending is overrated. Coaching and deep systems play is what matters.

And Canada has the best hockey minds in the world.
 
2013-06-14 12:39:15 AM  

Flappyhead: octopied: The best goalie in the league isn't from USA or Canada.

Yeah but Bobrovsky isn't playing right now, so it's tough to talk about him.


I actually meant Lundqvist. Bobrovsky's going to have to put in another Veznia  worthy season next year to be considered mentionable in "the best goalie in the league" scenario as far as I'm concerned. Lots of players can have a "One of" terrific season of part thereof. Need the continuity of doing it a few times to actually be considered as the best.
 
2013-06-14 09:01:05 AM  

Ishkur: Goaltending no longer matters. All a goalie has to be is adequate (ie: no unforced errors).

The system in front of him is everything. If you get the best defense, the best shot blockers, the best face off specialists and the best special teams, the goalie will never see a serious scoring chance all game long. He will see weak outside low percentage shots that he will save 99 times out of 100.

Goaltending is overrated. Coaching and deep systems play is what matters.

And Canada has the best hockey minds in the world.


That might work on the smaller NHL ice surface where you can pack it in in front of the net, but on an Olympic sized sheet the defense is more spread out and the offense has more room to operate and be creative. Quality shots will get through and then you need a good goaltender to keep them out.
 
2013-06-14 02:08:24 PM  

soopey: That might work on the smaller NHL ice surface where you can pack it in in front of the net, but on an Olympic sized sheet the defense is more spread out and the offense has more room to operate and be creative. Quality shots will get through and then you need a good goaltender to keep them out.


Actually, the exact opposite happens: The larger ice stupifies the game, and reduces the action quotient because there's more "dead zone" play (ie: any area of the ice where the puck is not in a threatening scoring position). Hockey is most exciting when the puck is in front of the net or is moving towards it. The larger ice surface is counter-intuitive to that, because it encourages collapsing zone defenses, stunted positional play, endless cycling in the dead zones in the corners, and lots of dump ins and dump outs because the width of the ice makes it easier to clear the puck and defend better.

In short, the Olympic-sized ice surface turns hockey into soccer on skates: Lots of movement but nothing getting accomplished, and the puck always far away from the net (where all the excitement happens). That's why there is less scoring in European leagues.

We want aggressive fore-checking, forced puck movement from lack of space, mobile defence, and an uptempo, physical style where each shift is going for broke. You do not get this in international hockey.
 
Displayed 24 of 24 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter






In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report