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(Serious Eats)   Seven myths about steak. This has nothing to do with your dog   ( seriouseats.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, studios, Don't Bother, steaks  
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13317 clicks; posted to Main » on 13 Jun 2013 at 4:22 AM (4 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



98 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-06-13 12:11:04 AM  
static.igossip.com
 
2013-06-13 12:28:56 AM  
The poke test comment is 3/4 right. It depends on the cut, it depends on several factors, but experience tells, and yeah, I do a poke test, but then again, I cook steaks a bit more often than most folks. A professional's experience though, sometimes you do a sneak and peek, if you're not as familiar with the cut, or you have a fairly large piece, then a thermometer is your friend. A New York isn't the same as a ribeye, and they cook slightly differently, and you have to practice a bit to get to know the feel, and it doesn't hurt to know the cut, and if you're the one doing the butchery, that helps. I cut a lot of ribeye and New Yorks, and each slab is a bit different, and it comes down to experience and knowing the cut to do a poke test. It's not so cut and dried as folks seem to think.
 
2013-06-13 12:34:46 AM  
Myth#8: Any steak cooked beyond medium rare still tastes good.

/bloody as hell for me, thank you
 
2013-06-13 01:00:49 AM  

mamoru: Myth#8: Any steak cooked beyond medium rare still tastes good.

/bloody as hell for me, thank you


myth #9
a million morons will post here with their anecdotal evidence that they will pretend is the same thing as fact.
for example, the first contestant already is QQing about the poke test.
sorry, but unless you have a lot of experience, poking = guessing.

myth #10
no one on the planet cares about your sauce or skillz. unless you are cooking at my house for free, yawnnnnn. isnt there a food site somewhere where you are king?
 
2013-06-13 01:15:33 AM  

namatad: mamoru: Myth#8: Any steak cooked beyond medium rare still tastes good.

/bloody as hell for me, thank you

myth #9
a million morons will post here with their anecdotal evidence that they will pretend is the same thing as fact.
for example, the first contestant already is QQing about the poke test.
sorry, but unless you have a lot of experience, poking = guessing.

myth #10
no one on the planet cares about your sauce or skillz. unless you are cooking at my house for free, yawnnnnn. isnt there a food site somewhere where you are king?


myth #11 - charcoal is better than gas.  Most people can't get charcoal to provide even temperature, so the steak cooks unevenly.  Gas is better.
 
2013-06-13 01:53:58 AM  
Myth # 12 - steak is overrated. Actually this is true.
 
2013-06-13 02:14:28 AM  
Myth #8 - When the ketchup bottle is empty, stop pouring!
 
2013-06-13 02:43:28 AM  

namatad: mamoru: Myth#8: Any steak cooked beyond medium rare still tastes good.

/bloody as hell for me, thank you

myth #9
a million morons will post here with their anecdotal evidence that they will pretend is the same thing as fact.
for example, the first contestant already is QQing about the poke test.
sorry, but unless you have a lot of experience, poking = guessing.


Pretty much. Cook a few thousand steaks, and you can guess pretty well. And even then, if you are working with a cut you're not familiar with, it takes some getting used to. Hanger steaks were a learning curve, because the texture is a little odd. There are a lot of factors. I do 20-40 steaks a night on average, and maybe twice that on a Friday and Saturday, and you get to know your cook times fairly well. I will disagree with the "flip often" comment in the article, but again, that's from a professional standpoint--cooking is the gentle art of leaving sh*t alone to do its thing. I don't like rearranging my grill too often, and part of that is simple math on how many actions I can perform in a minute, how many plates I can set up, how many tickets I can call off, and it's more a matter of time management. Screwing around with steaks, and flipping and reflipping, and resetting, that's less time to do the work necessary to get plates and tickets off my board. Most home cooks aren't doing 200 plates a night, and that is what sets professionals apart--it's about time management and efficiency. A home cook can afford to screw around a bit, a chef, not so much. There are time constraints, and that means that prep is an important part of things. Setting steaks out to "rest" before they go on the grill, not exactly conducive to getting tickets out of the window. Letting steaks rest after cooking, that IS important, and that has to do with how the muscle fibers react with heat, and letting a steak rest after cooking is what you want, unless you want folks to have a mess on the plate.
 
2013-06-13 03:25:25 AM  
In the book HEAT (about a writer's stint in one of Mario Batali's restaurants) they used skewers stuck into the side of the cut of meat to determine doneness.  Stick the skewer in for a moment and then pull it out and touch it to your lip.  How hot it felt told you how far along the steak was cooked.
 
2013-06-13 04:29:28 AM  
There is a lot at steak in this thread.

You have a beef with my pun?
 
2013-06-13 04:34:03 AM  
Get food steak, salt lightly, set on fire, flip, eat.
 
2013-06-13 04:35:29 AM  
Farking hipster foodies.
 
2013-06-13 04:42:42 AM  

Mr. Coffee Nerves: Myth #8 - When the ketchup bottle is empty, stop pouring!


Good. I was just thinking about how I missed eating meat.  I haven't had a good steak in years, I can't even remember the last time yo be honest.
 
2013-06-13 04:44:11 AM  

relaxitsjustme: Stick the skewer in for a moment and then pull it out and touch it to your lip.


Two things.  One:  That sounds like the script from a bad porno.  Two: Remind me never to eat at one of those unsanitary establishments.

TFA was wrong about the bone.  Bones add nothing to a steak other than extra weight for the butcher to charge you.  He was wrong about cutting to check, also.  If you cut it open while it's cooking, or cut it and then throw it back on, that place where you cut into it will cook faster than the unbreached meat, making it uneven.  Thermometers are not quite as bad, but still no good; don't breach the meat unless it's a roast and you're cooking the whole thing to full doneness.
 
2013-06-13 04:44:42 AM  
How about: "The only proper doneness for a steak is the doneness that I prefer.  Anyone who likes their steak cooked to a different degree is a moron!"

Man, I get tired of hearing that one.

/medium-rare to medium, I'm not fussy about it.
 
2013-06-13 04:52:58 AM  
Myth #8 - Men can discuss rationally, sanely and without charges of grievous bodily harm the relative merits of their personal methods for cooking steak.
 
2013-06-13 04:53:19 AM  
Heat up a piece of cast iron as hot as you can, salt/pepper, sear one minute per side, two minutes in a hot oven, rest for a spell, enjoy. Don't over think it.
 
2013-06-13 04:54:26 AM  
I really enjoy when my waiter brother in law is chowing down on McDonalds telling me about how his customers have absolutely no taste or understanding of steak because they ordered it X or Y way with Z condiment.

The Best steak is one that I enjoy.
 
2013-06-13 04:56:25 AM  
so the same site that says don't bother to let the steak warm up at room temp has another article that says you should start with low heat then on really high heat
 
2013-06-13 04:57:44 AM  
hmmm...  going by this meat-o-graph I must be overcooking my steaks just a bit.

www.seriouseats.com

I cook mine over an old General Electric J79 Sportsman Turbo Afterburner Grill.

They usually come out looking like this...

dsp.imageg.net

Now that's good eatin'!
 
2013-06-13 04:59:17 AM  
If my steak isn't exactly 132 degrees I will strap you to a chair and make you watch as I murder your family and burn your house down with you in it.

/average response
//as long as it isnt burnt or still cold I'm not going to complain
 
2013-06-13 05:05:49 AM  

bedtundy: hmmm...  going by this meat-o-graph I must be overcooking my steaks just a bit.

[www.seriouseats.com image 500x195]

I cook mine over an old General Electric J79 Sportsman Turbo Afterburner Grill.

They usually come out looking like this...

[dsp.imageg.net image 275x279]

Now that's good eatin'!


You turn meat into ding dongs? Or is it a puck, I can't tell?
 
2013-06-13 05:12:05 AM  
There needs to be a nice crispy edge to a medium steak.

Nothing else will do, unless you are grilling some sort of exotic like elk, bison, or ostrich.
 
2013-06-13 05:19:05 AM  
What I do:

- Take steak out of fridge 30 minutes before grilling.
- Salt and pepper the steak, lightly oil the grate.
- Throw steak on for 3 minutes.
- Flip and grill for another 3 minutes.
- Take off and let rest for 5 minutes.

/Off to RTFA now.
 
2013-06-13 05:28:15 AM  
My recipe:

-Find someones cow
-Hit cow in head with steel pipe
-Start gnawing on the unconscious cow
 
2013-06-13 05:34:03 AM  
meh, steak
 
2013-06-13 05:42:45 AM  

Public Savant: bedtundy: hmmm...  going by this meat-o-graph I must be overcooking my steaks just a bit.

[www.seriouseats.com image 500x195]

I cook mine over an old General Electric J79 Sportsman Turbo Afterburner Grill.

They usually come out looking like this...

[dsp.imageg.net image 275x279]

Now that's good eatin'!

You turn meat into ding dongs? Or is it a puck, I can't tell?


heh... it's a puck, but I can see how it looks like a ding dong.

/now I miss hostess snacks even more.
 
2013-06-13 05:54:22 AM  
1. Cutting it to check.  Depending on how your meat is cooking, it can dry up the area a bit.  Depending on the size of the steak this can lose enough uniformity to the point some will find it takes away from the whole experience. (unless it's really close to being done and not much cooking is needed).

2. The bone(and things attached as mentioned) do flavor the meat, but it's not always as noticeable depending on how it's cooked.  Author states he likes the taste of the meat closer to the bone(as flavored by bits on the bone), ergo, he's fooling himself a smidge.  Anyone who specifically does not like the taste of the fat/gristle/cartilage/etc can tell you that it does affect the meat.  It's also just not the meat close to the bone.  This is very noticable if it's done in a pan and the meat simmers in it's own juices, the taste spreads.

Beef does have it's own flavor which can mask the situation, but it's very obvious in chicken.

Take a well trimmed breast fillet and boil it(I do this for a variety of things where the chicken gets spiced or sauced later, or cubed and dropped in a cheese dip or melted philly style sammige).  Compare to a baked whole chicken's breast meat.  Very different.

My parents make chicken soup with whole pieces of chicken(Ie meat on the bone, legs, thighs, etc).  I call it chicken bone soup because it's so earthy tasting as to be overpowering.  It's pervasive, meat is not as impermeable as people think.

Here's the thing.  Bone is not solid, it's porous, and many times hollow(but with marrow).  A lot of what's in those spaces oozes out when cooked.(smooth and waxy when raw, rough and dry when cooked, all that material went somewhere...)  You won't notice it a lot on the grill where it can drip right off, but in a pan, even in a batch of ribs, and it's noticeable to one who happens to be able to taste the difference, more so for people who dislike the taste.

Author sounds like someone with technical skill, but not exactly a super-taster.

3. Need to thaw your meat?  If it's not too thick, run a sink full of hot water, drop in the meat(if it's wrapped in plastic.)
We do this with frozen bacon in the vac-sealed plastic.  As long as you don't have too good of a water heater, it shouldn't do anything to the meat. I imagine it could work with steaks that aren't super thick, but you'd have to saran-wrap them even if they come on the styrofoam tray w/ plastic wrap(too much air and insulation from the tray), and not lie it flat on the bottom, prop it up with the drain from the other sink or something.

(not entirely sure you couldn't drop in bare meat, not that much of an expert)
 
2013-06-13 06:00:54 AM  

Tealeaf: How about: "The only proper doneness for a steak is the doneness that I prefer.  Anyone who likes their steak cooked to a different degree is a moron!"

Man, I get tired of hearing that one.

/medium-rare to medium, I'm not fussy about it.


That is the proper doneness, since that is the doneness that I also prefer.  I've given you a +smart.
 
2013-06-13 06:16:22 AM  
3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-06-13 06:27:13 AM  
Myth #1: "You should let a thick steak rest at room temperature before you cook it."
The Reality:  While it's true that slowly bringing a steak up to its final serving temperature will promote more even cooking.

And that's where I stopped reading. Does this farking person know what "Myth" means?
 
2013-06-13 06:31:22 AM  

abhorrent1: Myth #1: "You should let a thick steak rest at room temperature before you cook it."
The Reality:  While it's true that slowly bringing a steak up to its final serving temperature will promote more even cooking.

And that's where I stopped reading. Does this farking person know what "Myth" means?


He went on to say that letting it sit at room temperature for any reasonable length of time doesn't bring the core up to serving temperature.

See what happens when you stop reading?  You look foolish.
 
2013-06-13 06:32:54 AM  

bunner: Get food steak, salt lightly, set on near fire, flip, eat.


ftfy
 
2013-06-13 06:40:53 AM  
What about if she doesn't eat meat but she still likes the bone?
 
2013-06-13 06:41:16 AM  
All steak must be medium-well, which looks like TFA writer's version of "well". That is not a well-done steak, a well-done steak is not farking red inside, it's a very pale pink. I had to open the image on my other screen just to make sure I wasn't seeing things.

His idea of "rare" is just farking raw. I don't understand people who eat raw meat, they must be those people who still have Neanderthal DNA.
 
2013-06-13 06:44:17 AM  
After you cook a couple a dozen steaks a day for years, you figure a couple of things out about them. First, all steaks behave differently--it's nature, not McDonalds. So any rules are, essentially, useless. Next, after awhile you can look at a steak and figure out its doneness by the amount of liquid on its surface. When in doubt a good thermometer will tell you where it's at. As for when to season, if you can tell the difference between a steak seasoned before, after, or during cooking you are either an idiot savant or lying. The only golden rule re cooking is to stop cooking it a little before the desired doneness and let it rest 5 minutes or so.

That being said, a good steak is about sourcing, not cooking. There is nothing to cooking them, so you need to find a consistent supplier that isn't fudging on the number of days it was aged. Basically most steaks the general public eats are not dry aged, so they are staring with an inferior product, and will end up with a pretty bland meal. Even Costco "prime" meat is a waste of money unless aged. Go out and get a 32 day dry aged NY and you will see what I mean.
 
2013-06-13 06:45:00 AM  

Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy: All steak must be medium-well, which looks like TFA writer's version of "well". That is not a well-done steak, a well-done steak is not farking red inside, it's a very pale pink. I had to open the image on my other screen just to make sure I wasn't seeing things.

His idea of "rare" is just farking raw. I don't understand people who eat raw meat, they must be those people who still have Neanderthal DNA.


Make sense.  Neanderthals didn't yet develop a taste for show leather.
 
2013-06-13 06:45:36 AM  

sendtodave: show


shoe

/dammitsomuch
 
2013-06-13 06:57:42 AM  
Hrmm... so should I listen to Gordon Ramsay or some random blogger?
 
2013-06-13 07:07:27 AM  
Well done with A1 for this supertaster.
 
2013-06-13 07:11:06 AM  

whither_apophis: Myth # 12 - steak is overrated. Actually this is true.


You don't come to a steak porn thread and blather your godless vegan ways!
 
2013-06-13 07:17:24 AM  
This is all opinion.  However, I have found in that more people are of the opinion that the steaks I cook off the heat over charcoal with mesquite are damn good.    There is no flipping at all.  The meat is slow cooked just like bbq ribs.  After doing this for a while, the idea of cooking it on a grill and flipping it seems totally asinine.
 
2013-06-13 07:21:19 AM  

Authentic Chop Suey: After you cook a couple a dozen steaks a day for years, you figure a couple of things out about them. First, all steaks behave differently--it's nature, not McDonalds. So any rules are, essentially, useless. Next, after awhile you can look at a steak and figure out its doneness by the amount of liquid on its surface. When in doubt a good thermometer will tell you where it's at. As for when to season, if you can tell the difference between a steak seasoned before, after, or during cooking you are either an idiot savant or lying. The only golden rule re cooking is to stop cooking it a little before the desired doneness and let it rest 5 minutes or so.

That being said, a good steak is about sourcing, not cooking. There is nothing to cooking them, so you need to find a consistent supplier that isn't fudging on the number of days it was aged. Basically most steaks the general public eats are not dry aged, so they are staring with an inferior product, and will end up with a pretty bland meal. Even Costco "prime" meat is a waste of money unless aged. Go out and get a 32 day dry aged NY and you will see what I mean.


i39.tinypic.com
 
2013-06-13 07:22:48 AM  

Authentic Chop Suey: After you cook a couple a dozen steaks a day for years, you figure a couple of things out about them. First, all steaks behave differently--it's nature, not McDonalds. So any rules are, essentially, useless. Next, after awhile you can look at a steak and figure out its doneness by the amount of liquid on its surface. When in doubt a good thermometer will tell you where it's at. As for when to season, if you can tell the difference between a steak seasoned before, after, or during cooking you are either an idiot savant or lying. The only golden rule re cooking is to stop cooking it a little before the desired doneness and let it rest 5 minutes or so.

That being said, a good steak is about sourcing, not cooking. There is nothing to cooking them, so you need to find a consistent supplier that isn't fudging on the number of days it was aged. Basically most steaks the general public eats are not dry aged, so they are staring with an inferior product, and will end up with a pretty bland meal. Even Costco "prime" meat is a waste of money unless aged. Go out and get a 32 day dry aged NY and you will see what I mean.


I think you've nailed it.  I think a lot of folks who have a ritual they perform that supposedly produces the best steak in the world did it once with a steak and it turned out better than anything they had previously done so they figured they had discovered the secret formula.  As you point out, there are so many variables that no standardized set of rituals and incantations will produce the same results.  One needs to be able to evaluate the steak, the fire, if you're cooking outdoors you need to understand the effect of weather extremes, even the kind of salt used has a dramatic effect.

Probably your best point is the importance of sourcing.  You can get a dozen New York Strips from a dozen different sources and the differences can be dramatic.  Most good butcher shops have a single producer from whom they get most of their better cuts.  That, plus the fact that the shop will treat the beef in a consistent manner, reduces variability for that shop.  If you want to grill great steaks, try to control for as many variables as possible and then develop a method that works.

But cooking steaks is kind of like fattening the steer. Sure, there are plenty of formulas about what to feed and how to feed but if you really want to get consistent quality, start with the genetics and then have enough experience to look at that steer and know what adjustments to make.
 
2013-06-13 07:25:08 AM  

God Is My Co-Pirate: Authentic Chop Suey: After you cook a couple a dozen steaks a day for years, you figure a couple of things out about them. First, all steaks behave differently--it's nature, not McDonalds. So any rules are, essentially, useless. Next, after awhile you can look at a steak and figure out its doneness by the amount of liquid on its surface. When in doubt a good thermometer will tell you where it's at. As for when to season, if you can tell the difference between a steak seasoned before, after, or during cooking you are either an idiot savant or lying. The only golden rule re cooking is to stop cooking it a little before the desired doneness and let it rest 5 minutes or so.

That being said, a good steak is about sourcing, not cooking. There is nothing to cooking them, so you need to find a consistent supplier that isn't fudging on the number of days it was aged. Basically most steaks the general public eats are not dry aged, so they are staring with an inferior product, and will end up with a pretty bland meal. Even Costco "prime" meat is a waste of money unless aged. Go out and get a 32 day dry aged NY and you will see what I mean.


Yup. That'll do ya.
 
2013-06-13 07:25:48 AM  

Boloxor the Insipid: This is all opinion.  However, I have found in that more people are of the opinion that the steaks I cook off the heat over charcoal with mesquite are damn good.    There is no flipping at all.  The meat is slow cooked just like bbq ribs.  After doing this for a while, the idea of cooking it on a grill and flipping it seems totally asinine.


Would that technically be smoking, not grilling?
 
2013-06-13 07:27:19 AM  
Pfff... Steak is for the common folk. I only eat endangered species from the rain forest until they become extinct. Hell, I clone extinct animals just to eat them to extinction.
 
2013-06-13 07:31:02 AM  

Boloxor the Insipid: This is all opinion.  However, I have found in that more people are of the opinion that the steaks I cook off the heat over charcoal with mesquite are damn good.    There is no flipping at all.  The meat is slow cooked just like bbq ribs.  After doing this for a while, the idea of cooking it on a grill and flipping it seems totally asinine.


Please tell me this is a troll.
 
2013-06-13 07:35:33 AM  

Lsherm: myth #11 - charcoal is better than gas.  Most people can't get charcoal to provide even temperature, so the steak cooks unevenly.  Gas is better.


I am not saying charcoal or gas is better, but if you are used to doing it, there is nothing preventing an even temperature and you can get a different flavor from the meat. So, no myth here if you prefer charcoal flavor differences. I have no problem with either method of cooking because steak is awesome.
 
2013-06-13 07:38:09 AM  

mamoru: Myth#8: Any steak cooked beyond medium rare still tastes good.

/bloody as hell for me, thank you


Myth #9: Steak still has blood in it*

*beyond some trivial amount

/myoglobin is what you are seeing, which is found in muscle tissue
 
2013-06-13 07:41:37 AM  
Myth #12342: the only way to cook a good steak is on the grill.

For me, the best steak is this:

Get a 3 pound slab of sirloin- 2-3 inches thick is best.  Personally, I also prefer a little personality; grass fed beef may be a tad tougher and less marbled, but I prefer the taste and its MUCH healthier for you.  Slather it with some olive oil, salt, and pepper.  Maybe a chili flake or two if you want some spice.  Sear it crusty on each side on a cast-iron skillet that is hot as hell- 1-3 minutes usually works.  Transfer to the oven at 300 or so and bake it for 15-40 minutes (longer for more done, but I prefer shorter).

At 15 minutes, you'll get a thick piece of meat that is crusty on the outside, yet warm and bloody on the inside.  It'll feed 6-10 people easily, or can be re-heated for steak and eggs, steak sandwiches, etc.  You can also toss some potatoes into the skillet on the way to the oven- they'll soak up some of the oil and blood that the steak releases.
 
2013-06-13 07:43:42 AM  

UrinalPooper: Hrmm... so should I listen to Gordon Ramsay or some random blogger?


Kenji is hardly "some random blogger" I'm afraid. He's a vet of America's Test Kitchen / Cook's Illustrated, and I'd trust them a hell of a lot more than Ramsay.
 
2013-06-13 07:46:39 AM  

pkellmey: Lsherm: myth #11 - charcoal is better than gas.  Most people can't get charcoal to provide even temperature, so the steak cooks unevenly.  Gas is better.

I am not saying charcoal or gas is better, but if you are used to doing it, there is nothing preventing an even temperature and you can get a different flavor from the meat. So, no myth here if you prefer charcoal flavor differences. I have no problem with either method of cooking because steak is awesome.


It's an old argument.  I thought this was interesting, from the Art and Science of Cooking, Vol 2

Basically, charcoal sears better.  Duh.

Pardon the formatting, I'm lazy.

As the hot gases travel from the flame to the
radiating surface, they mix with cooler surrounding air. That mixing makes it difficult to raise the
temperature of the radiant emitters in a gas grill to
much higher than about 800 •c I 1,500 •F-a
good 300 ·c I 500 •F below the radiant temperature of glowing charcoal. That is a large difference
in effective temperature, and it has a disproportionate effect on radiant heating power.
So although a gas grill at full tilt may produce
5 Wlcm
2
(110 BTUih. in
2
)  of radiant heat, a
charcoal grill can easily deliver more than twice this
heat flux, or about 11 Wlcm
2
(250 BTUih · in
2
). The
awesome radiance of glowing coals is what gives
charcoal grills their unrivaled ability to sear in a
flash.
 
2013-06-13 07:48:28 AM  
Lsherm:
myth #11 - charcoal is better than gas.   Most people can't get charcoal to provide even temperature, so the steak cooks unevenly.  Gas is better.

You did not just argue that gas is better, you just argued that most people suck at grilling.

The "Only flip it once" myth is to keep people from farking with the grill.  If you continually flip your steak it will take FOREVER to cook.
 
2013-06-13 07:55:06 AM  

abhorrent1: Myth #1: "You should let a thick steak rest at room temperature before you cook it."
The Reality:  While it's true that slowly bringing a steak up to its final serving temperature will promote more even cooking.

And that's where I stopped reading. Does this farking person know what "Myth" means?


You should have kept reading. He explains that the amount of heating that occurs within 20 minutes of resting at room temp brings the inside of the steak a mere 2 degrees closer to being done. So 20 minutes does nothing interms of thawing.
 
2013-06-13 08:08:51 AM  
That's an awfully long meat thermometer advertisement.

mike_d85: The "Only flip it once" myth is to keep people from farking with the grill. If you continually flip your steak it will take FOREVER to cook.


Actually TFA claims that flipping makes it cook faster and that makes sense.  You get better heat transfer between objects that are further apart in temperature.
 
2013-06-13 08:16:59 AM  

juvandy: Myth #12342: the only way to cook a good steak is on the grill.


In my current living situation I can't do much grilling.

My preferred method for cooking steak is to season it with salt and pepper and then sear in a hot skillet. I then transfer it to a broiler pan with a drip tray in a hot oven.  Once I'm 5 degrees lower than my target internal temp I put the oven to broil for a few minutes.  Sometimes I add BBQ sauce but for a decent cut of meat I don't like to put anything on it.  When the steak is almost done I reheat the skillet with the steak juices from searing still in it and add a little butter and some sliced onion and cook until they are my preferred texture.  I'm not a fan of mushrooms but you can also do this with fungus if you like.
 
2013-06-13 08:19:34 AM  
This article is written by Kenji, the self-appointed expert on how to cook everything. Ignore, there's nothing of value here.
 
2013-06-13 08:21:46 AM  
letting the steak come to room temp really has nothing to do with cooking faster as it does with the proteins and fibers of the meat. if you are seeing steam coming from your steak as youre searing then it might not be hot enough.
cooking steak doesnt have to be a big ordeal. i do it like this and it always come out great.
i only buy my steaks fresh right before i cook them. pre heat oven to 400. i rinse quickly. a lil olive oil both sides. kosher salt and pepper both sides to taste. let a pan get nice and hot on the stove. throw the steak on and let it sear till it gets a nice crust. i check using tongs to see if the crust is nice. then flip to the other side till it gets a crust as well. then right in the oven for a few mins. take out, let it rest a few mins (by the time i get the wine and other stuff ready) sit, eat, enjoy. perfect everytime. rare to med rare
 
2013-06-13 08:48:14 AM  
I was at the grocery store looking for munchies while watching a baseball game at a buddies palce, and they wanted $8.99 for a dozen cold, pre-cooked, chicken wings, with a boring/typical buffalo sauce.  This seemed ridiculous to me, so I walked over to the meat dept. and they had New York Strips for $8.99/lb.  I couldn't believe a 1lb NYS cost the same as a dozen lame-ass wings...easiest decision ever as far as which one to buy.

/Cooked in a cast-iron skillet, montreal seasoning blend in the hot pan and on the meat, medium rare.  Rested 5 minutes, no sauce.
//Good decision
 
2013-06-13 08:52:19 AM  

my_cats_breath_smells_like_cat_food: I was at the grocery store looking for munchies while watching a baseball game at a buddies palce, and they wanted $8.99 for a dozen cold, pre-cooked, chicken wings, with a boring/typical buffalo sauce.  This seemed ridiculous to me, so I walked over to the meat dept. and they had New York Strips for $8.99/lb.  I couldn't believe a 1lb NYS cost the same as a dozen lame-ass wings...easiest decision ever as far as which one to buy.

/Cooked in a cast-iron skillet, montreal seasoning blend in the hot pan and on the meat, medium rare.  Rested 5 minutes, no sauce.
//Good decision


yea theres a key food by me in queens the sells 1" thick first cut rib eyes bone in that we get all the time for like 7-8 bucks a piece.
 
2013-06-13 08:52:26 AM  

Lsherm: myth #11 - charcoal is better than gas.  Most people can't get charcoal to provide even temperature, so the steak cooks unevenly.  Gas is better.


Blasphemy! Gas is for people too lazy to clean a grill after they've used it. If you're going to cook steaks with gas, you may as well do it indoors on a stove. As for charcoal not providing even temperature, if great-great-grandma could cook on a stove fueled by chunks of wood, then by gawd, you can learn to cook with chunks of charcoal. Also, flaaaaavor does not come from gas.
 
2013-06-13 08:58:38 AM  

greggm59: This article is written by Kenji, the self-appointed expert on how to cook everything. Ignore, there's nothing of value here.


You obviously DNRTFA.
 
2013-06-13 08:59:07 AM  
I cook my steak on a foreman and eat it with ketchup just to piss people off.
 
2013-06-13 09:01:29 AM  
This guy is full of shiat. He has contradicted several things touted by certified chefs, and I saw nothing to indicate that he is one. Also, My flip-a-holic father made awful steaks I could barely choke down when I was a kid. When I make them and turn them only once, they are good.
 
2013-06-13 09:11:02 AM  

kitsuneymg: ou should have kept reading


But then he might have learned something!

uncoveror: This guy is full of shiat. He has contradicted several things touted by certified chefs, and I saw nothing to indicate that he is one. Also, My flip-a-holic father made awful steaks I could barely choke down when I was a kid. When I make them and turn them only once, they are good.


This guy is a former test cook for ATK and his methodology is sound. His conclusion, if you had bothered to read with an open mind, is that flipping doesn't hurt, but not flipping also doesn't hurt. Neither method is a panacea for creating great steaks.

Also, he throws his methodology right out there - it's not like you can't go repeat his experiments if you think he's full of shiat, instead of appealing to authorities who do not show any indication of testing the voodoo that was handed down to them during their apprenticeships.
 
2013-06-13 09:28:27 AM  

WordyGrrl: Lsherm: myth #11 - charcoal is better than gas.  Most people can't get charcoal to provide even temperature, so the steak cooks unevenly.  Gas is better.

Blasphemy! Gas is for people too lazy to clean a grill after they've used it. If you're going to cook steaks with gas, you may as well do it indoors on a stove. As for charcoal not providing even temperature, if great-great-grandma could cook on a stove fueled by chunks of wood, then by gawd, you can learn to cook with chunks of charcoal. Also, flaaaaavor does not come from gas.


It's not even difficult to get even heat.  Spread the coals out and put the farking lid back on.  That way you cook the whole steak and absorb the flavor from the coals.  Seriously, not difficult.  A thick 1.5-2lb steak takes 4 minutes per side, rest for 5 minutes, eat (with a bottle of wine as a side, along with some fresh corn cooked on the cob and pretzel rolls).  If it's under 1.5lbs or a bit thinner, I'll generally go about 3.5 minutes per side.

I do rub it down with olive oil and fresh-cracked black pepper (not too much, just enough for seasoning).  I also do warm them up to room temp, but I do that by purchasing fresh cut steak from the meat department and letting it sit on the counter for a few hours, not the 20 minutes they're talking about.
 
2013-06-13 09:43:25 AM  

WordyGrrl: Lsherm: myth #11 - charcoal is better than gas.  Most people can't get charcoal to provide even temperature, so the steak cooks unevenly.  Gas is better.

Blasphemy! Gas is for people too lazy to clean a grill after they've used it. If you're going to cook steaks with gas, you may as well do it indoors on a stove. As for charcoal not providing even temperature, if great-great-grandma could cook on a stove fueled by chunks of wood, then by gawd, you can learn to cook with chunks of charcoal. Also, flaaaaavor does not come from gas.


A whole lot of MFing THIS.
 
2013-06-13 09:46:36 AM  

hubiestubert: The poke test comment is 3/4 right. It depends on the cut, it depends on several factors, but experience tells, and yeah, I do a poke test, but then again, I cook steaks a bit more often than most folks. A professional's experience though, sometimes you do a sneak and peek, if you're not as familiar with the cut, or you have a fairly large piece, then a thermometer is your friend. A New York isn't the same as a ribeye, and they cook slightly differently, and you have to practice a bit to get to know the feel, and it doesn't hurt to know the cut, and if you're the one doing the butchery, that helps. I cut a lot of ribeye and New Yorks, and each slab is a bit different, and it comes down to experience and knowing the cut to do a poke test. It's not so cut and dried as folks seem to think.


For some reason, this reminds me of the time our kitchen had hired some shiny new kids out of chef's school who spent the better part of the day constantly poking an entire rib primal with their fingers.  The head chef spent his valuable time leaning against the counter and laughing his ass off at these weird little creatures.  It turns out, he put them up to it by telling them that "real" chefs can check doneness on a prime rib by poking it.

I miss that job.

/He also had a policy that if you ever used the term "flavor profile," you had to clean the grease traps without any gloves.
 
2013-06-13 09:47:42 AM  
Been cooking excellent steaks for over 30 years and I have to say that list is laughable.

.1 DO let your steak reach room temp before cooking
.2 Meh
.3 Meh
.4 Meh
.5 Salt and pepper only, added about 10 to 15 minutes before cooking.
.6a Do NOT use a fork to turn your steak.
.6b Do not cut your steak to check it, learn to poke it with your finger.
7. See 6b
 
2013-06-13 09:51:13 AM  
My ex-neighbor was a chef and he gave me the "salt the shiat out the steak 2 days before" tip and it completely blew my mind how much better the outcome is when you do that.

I've even invested in a "steak resting" pan for the fridge with an elevated wire rack...can't recommend the method enough.
 
2013-06-13 09:52:45 AM  

Psycoholic_Slag: Been cooking excellent steaks for over 30 years and I have to say that list is laughable.

.1 DO let your steak reach room temp before cooking
.2 Meh
.3 Meh
.4 Meh
.5 Salt and pepper only, added about 10 to 15 minutes before cooking.
.6a Do NOT use a fork to turn your steak.
.6b Do not cut your steak to check it, learn to poke it with your finger.
7. See 6b


The thing about cooking steak is to figure out what works for you, not everyone else.  What tastes good to you.  Figure that out, repeat.  I may try the salting thing, just for a change, this weekend.  However, I actually like the taste of straight steak cooked on hickory charcoal (no damned lighter fluid, either - I light my coals in a chimney with just newspaper to get them going).
 
2013-06-13 10:20:40 AM  

ronaprhys: Psycoholic_Slag: Been cooking excellent steaks for over 30 years and I have to say that list is laughable.

.1 DO let your steak reach room temp before cooking
.2 Meh
.3 Meh
.4 Meh
.5 Salt and pepper only, added about 10 to 15 minutes before cooking.
.6a Do NOT use a fork to turn your steak.
.6b Do not cut your steak to check it, learn to poke it with your finger.
7. See 6b

The thing about cooking steak is to figure out what works for you, not everyone else.  What tastes good to you.  Figure that out, repeat.  I may try the salting thing, just for a change, this weekend.  However, I actually like the taste of straight steak cooked on hickory charcoal (no damned lighter fluid, either - I light my coals in a chimney with just newspaper to get them going).


Of course.  I don't even follow my own rules all the time but it's a guideline.  The worse thing you can do is overcook the poor steak. Now I'm craving steak.
 
2013-06-13 10:24:13 AM  

pkellmey: greggm59: This article is written by Kenji, the self-appointed expert on how to cook everything. Ignore, there's nothing of value here.

You obviously DNRTFA.


That's true, as I stopped reading his stuff a couple of years ago. It was annoying with his constantly describing everything he makes as " the "ultimate," "greatest," "best" and other such self-congratulatory superlatives. The America's Test Kitchen influence in that regard is obvious. I can also do without pictures of his dog on a regular basis. The Daily Puppy doesn't have pictures of food, so why are updates of his dog so often featured on Serious Eats, other than to read the fawning comments of readers that inevitably follow?
 
2013-06-13 10:24:46 AM  

hubiestubert: The poke test comment is 3/4 right. It depends on the cut, it depends on several factors, but experience tells, and yeah, I do a poke test, but then again, I cook steaks a bit more often than most folks. A professional's experience though, sometimes you do a sneak and peek, if you're not as familiar with the cut, or you have a fairly large piece, then a thermometer is your friend. A New York isn't the same as a ribeye, and they cook slightly differently, and you have to practice a bit to get to know the feel, and it doesn't hurt to know the cut, and if you're the one doing the butchery, that helps. I cut a lot of ribeye and New Yorks, and each slab is a bit different, and it comes down to experience and knowing the cut to do a poke test. It's not so cut and dried as folks seem to think.


If people think your steaks are dry...

/jk
 
2013-06-13 10:33:06 AM  

Psycoholic_Slag: Of course.  I don't even follow my own rules all the time but it's a guideline.  The worse thing you can do is overcook the poor steak. Now I'm craving steak.


I'm in the midst of a dissolution right now and one of the things I reinstituted in my newly-single life is steak night.  It's very simple:

- I used hickory charcoal.  I can't remember the brand, but it's in the grocery in a green bag (Kingsford?).  I could use lump charcoal, but that's just too much of a pain for me.
-Steaks come from the butcher's section in my grocery.  Typically strips or porterhouses, depending on the sale.  1.1 to 1.5lbs, about 1.25" thick
-As noted, they sit on my counter to warm up to room temp prior to anything happening.
-Once warmed and right after I start the coals, I rub the whole thing down with olive oil and put a decent coat of fresh cracked black pepper on it.  As a side note, I think I'll try sea salt on it first, let it sit, then the olive oil/pepper treatment this week.
-As noted, grilling is 3.5-4 minutes per side, with a 5 minute rest
-sides would be two ears of sweet corn, pretzel rolls, cheese (I've got a thing for cheese), and a bottle of wine - typically a nice cab that's been aged in oak.


This is Saturday or Sunday night, depending on when I do my shopping.
 
2013-06-13 10:35:40 AM  
The rationale behind turning it only once is that each time you pick it up with tongs and turn it over it toughens the meat. When I was a teenager i was trained by an really good, very cool old chef - you turned steaks once, and only with your fingers. You kept a bowl of cold water nearby to dip your fingers in before turning them.
 
2013-06-13 10:50:27 AM  

happydude45: The rationale behind turning it only once is that each time you pick it up with tongs and turn it over it toughens the meat. When I was a teenager i was trained by an really good, very cool old chef - you turned steaks once, and only with your fingers. You kept a bowl of cold water nearby to dip your fingers in before turning them.


I live with my mom

Devoid of culinary science and you over played the "wise old sage" card.
 
2013-06-13 10:54:11 AM  
Hmmm -- lots of pansies who insist on cooking their meat to some temperature so they dont get sick...

I cant recall ever having gotten sick from steak -- turkey yes but steak never. And i'm a good alberta boy from a farm -- steak was and still is a regualr food and its not crazy to have it once or twice a week during the summer.

fbcdn-sphotos-f-a.akamaihd.net

Mmmm -- Let me tell you -- wood fire works the best -- the flames spit up at the dripping fat just right to melt and render it all -- not a touch of gristly chew crap. I cant tell you how much i hate seeing someone slice the fatty edge off their steak. Tragic. Its the best damn part if you do it right...

Dont flip your steak over and over -- 99% of people will jab a fork or something in the meat to do so and putting holes in it while its cooking is just draining it of juice. The heat is going to push all the juices through those holes every time you make them so dont do it.

As for bringing it up to temperature -- take it out of the fridge in the morning -- salt and pepper the meat portion lightly and the white fatty parts very heavily. Then wrap it in saran (tight) and leave it on the counter on a plate. The salt needs time to move through the meat and the fat is packed with water and the salt needs time to draw that out. Moisture is what makes that fatty part so tough and you can turn it into the best damn part of your steak by treating it carefully with extra salt. It will also render better leaving it healthier.

And honestly -- dont worry about the internal temperature. Just cook it how you like it. If you cant do that like an old hand then cook more steakums. I know i know -- ecoli or some crap will kill me. Well frankly store bought greens seem to be the bigger culprit in killing people by ecoli and nobody suggests cooking them to the right temp...

Seriously -- use steakunms -- Go buy a cheap pack of stewing beef and cook it peice by peice on a cast iron pan. Have some good dipping sauces ready (they are stew beef chunks -- not ribeye -- sauce is alright here) practice searing those little guys one by one and then eating while you go. Practice makes perfect and stew beef is cheap and when you sear it up in a really hot cast iron they come out like tiny steaks.

Unless you work in a restaurant dont worry about the internal temp. Just grill the sob and if its too cooked then next time cook it less. And if its undercooked you can throw it back on the grill or into the oven for a bit. But i wouldn't. Learn to appreciate undercooked steak. After awhile you wont consider it undercooked - its 'perfect'
 
2013-06-13 11:01:25 AM  

happydude45: The rationale behind turning it only once is that each time you pick it up with tongs and turn it over it toughens the meat. When I was a teenager i was trained by an really good, very cool old chef - you turned steaks once, and only with your fingers. You kept a bowl of cold water nearby to dip your fingers in before turning them.


If you wrap bacon on the end of your tongs, you don't ruin the taste with your stinky man-digits or risk burning  your finger tips.

Duh.
 
2013-06-13 11:11:41 AM  

Weidermeijer: whither_apophis: Myth # 12 - steak is overrated. Actually this is true.

You don't come to a steak porn thread and blather your godless vegan ways!


I ain't a vegan. Seared duck breast > steak.

/you know it to be true.
 
2013-06-13 11:18:22 AM  

Coach_J: happydude45: The rationale behind turning it only once is that each time you pick it up with tongs and turn it over it toughens the meat. When I was a teenager i was trained by an really good, very cool old chef - you turned steaks once, and only with your fingers. You kept a bowl of cold water nearby to dip your fingers in before turning them.

I live with my mom

Devoid of culinary science and you over played the "wise old sage" card.


But he had to lug buckets of brine up an impossibly tall staircase every St. Patrick's day to prepare the corned beef.
 
2013-06-13 11:42:13 AM  
Buy cheap cuts, marinate them and cook them properly.

i.imgur.com
 
2013-06-13 01:15:21 PM  
I've never seen someone so wrong. About steak no less.

/if you prick a steak with something sharp to test doneness, you're and idiot. If you must use a thermometer, for farks sake leave it in there until after it has rested.
 
2013-06-13 01:27:53 PM  
You took three chomps and then threw your hotdog up over here!
I got thirteen snakes over here!
 
2013-06-13 02:14:04 PM  

mikefinch: Hmmm -- lots of pansies who insist on cooking their meat to some temperature so they dont get sick...

I cant recall ever having gotten sick from steak -- turkey yes but steak never. And i'm a good alberta boy from a farm -- steak was and still is a regualr food and its not crazy to have it once or twice a week during the summer.


Steak ain't like poultry. It doesn't have an endemic parasite like salmonella to make one sick. You could sear a steak and serve it raw on the inside and it'd still be safe to eat. So it's largely a matter of personal taste.

People who like theirs "well-done" tend to like sauces like leftover ketchup packets from McDonald's.

/not saying there's anything WRONG with that
//you know what? F*ck it. I am INDEED saying there's something wrong with that

lots of redundant advice about a topic that's been well covered...

Seriously -- use steakunms -- Go buy a cheap pack of stewing beef and cook it peice by peice on a cast iron pan. Have some good dipping s
auces ready (they are stew beef chunks -- not ribeye -- sauce is alright here) practice searing those little guys one by one and then eating while you go. Practice makes perfect and stew beef is cheap and when you sear it up in a really hot cast iron they come out like tiny steaks.

And here's where I get to whip out my phone and call bullsh*t. Stew beef is typically chuck. Tough as hell. It requires low and slow cooking while wet to make it chewable. Unless your butcher sells sirloin for stew, OR you slice these suckers into inch-square pieces, they are nowhere near as tender as a properly prepared steak.

/my little sister once mixed stew chuck and sirloin for steak tips
//she blamed the sirloin for the toughness because it was grass-fed
///different parts of the cow have different densities based on how much work that muscle did? UNPOSSIBLE!
 
2013-06-13 03:50:04 PM  
How to make any cheap cut tender as all hell:

1. Cover in sea salt. Like, make it white. Other seasonings are optional for this, but I add fresh garlic and rosemary.

2. Let rest for 30 mins per inch of thickness. Adjust according to your cut.

3. Rinse really, really well in cool water then pat it dry with a towel.

There you go! Really tender steak.
 
2013-06-13 04:43:23 PM  

twistofsin: How to make any cheap cut tender as all hell:

1. Cover in sea salt. Like, make it white. Other seasonings are optional for this, but I add fresh garlic and rosemary.

2. Let rest for 30 mins per inch of thickness. Adjust according to your cut.

3. Rinse really, really well in cool water then pat it dry with a towel.

There you go! Really tender steak.


Just to clarify for #1, use  coarse sea salt, not table salt.
 
2013-06-13 05:28:21 PM  

ronaprhys: It's not even difficult to get even heat.  Spread the coals out and put the farking lid back on.  That way you cook the whole steak and absorb the flavor from the coals.  Seriously, not difficult.  A thick 1.5-2lb steak takes 4 minutes per side, rest for 5 minutes, eat (with a bottle of wine as a side, along with some fresh corn cooked on the cob and pretzel rolls).


Yep, that's about it for even heat. I do like to leave a cool spot just in case something's getting too cooked. And ah loves me some roasted-in-the-husk corn! The pretzel rolls sound intriguing... Do tell?
 
2013-06-13 05:32:38 PM  

Coach_J: WordyGrrl: Lsherm: myth #11 - charcoal is better than gas.  Most people can't get charcoal to provide even temperature, so the steak cooks unevenly.  Gas is better.

Blasphemy! Gas is for people too lazy to clean a grill after they've used it. If you're going to cook steaks with gas, you may as well do it indoors on a stove. As for charcoal not providing even temperature, if great-great-grandma could cook on a stove fueled by chunks of wood, then by gawd, you can learn to cook with chunks of charcoal. Also, flaaaaavor does not come from gas.

A whole lot of MFing THIS.


High five, coach! Getting even heat isn't difficult. Cleaning a grill isn't that hard. You can always rub the cooking grate with a chunk of raw onion to prevent sticking (and add some nice flavor). Wait until the coals are dead and gone, then scoop it out with a garden trowel.
 
2013-06-13 05:52:27 PM  
Season, Bag, Sous Vide @~135F. adjusting the time on the thickness, Remove from bag, sear in stupid hot pan for ~10seconds per side, never look back.
 
2013-06-13 06:35:03 PM  
Step 1: Read article
Step 2: Open thread
Step 3: Roll eyes at all the people who repeat everything the author of TFA just debunked

None of you are master steak chefs. Your methods are not the best or only way to cook a steak. Stop pretending you are Grill Jesus.
 
2013-06-13 06:52:57 PM  

Saborlas: And here's where I get to whip out my phone and call bullsh*t. Stew beef is typically chuck. Tough as hell. It requires low and slow cooking while wet to make it chewable. Unless your butcher sells sirloin for stew, OR you slice these suckers into inch-square pieces, they are nowhere near as tender as a properly prepared steak.


They are not as tender -- i agree -- but the idea is to practice cooking meat so its still red inside while having a tasty and inexpensive snack -- and it CAN be tender -- just slice it into thirds across the grain. Flank steak is damn tough but london broil is freaking fine ass food.... Its not going to compare to a rib eye steak but for 4 bucks a pack at the store its a steal -- compared to a similar amount of steak its like a 1/5 the price -- and cooked right it can turn out like steaks -- slice your meat -- i know they are tiny -- give half of each piece to your wife or something

Wait -- 1 inch squares? Thats what i'm talking about -- the chopped 1 inch cubes of stewing beef. You can buy them in the little styrofoam packs... And then you snip those into two or three bite sized bits after its cooked so its super tender little steaky morsels good for dipping...
 
2013-06-13 09:54:32 PM  

Com-un-sense: Step 1: Read article
Step 2: Open thread
Step 3: Roll eyes at all the people who repeat everything the author of TFA just debunked

None of you are master steak chefs. Your methods are not the best or only way to cook a steak. Stop pretending you are Grill Jesus.


Neither is the author of TFA. He just pretends to be one online.
 
2013-06-13 10:19:18 PM  
1.5" boneless ribeyes:

Black and blue

That is all
 
2013-06-14 12:34:57 AM  
No one gives a perfectly seared werewolf's colon about how you like to prepare steak.
 
2013-06-14 03:06:27 AM  

Yogimus: No one gives a perfectly seared werewolf's colon about how you like to prepare steak.


But properly prepared wolf nipple chips are the bomb
 
2013-06-14 03:31:18 AM  

relaxitsjustme: But properly prepared wolf nipple chips are the bomb


Lord Bolton?


/since there's so much GoT discussion going on elsewhere on Fark, into perpetuity apparently....
 
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