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(Serious Eats)   Seven myths about steak. This has nothing to do with your dog   (seriouseats.com) divider line 98
    More: Interesting, studios, Don't Bother, steaks  
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13280 clicks; posted to Main » on 13 Jun 2013 at 4:22 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-06-13 12:11:04 AM
static.igossip.com
 
2013-06-13 12:28:56 AM
The poke test comment is 3/4 right. It depends on the cut, it depends on several factors, but experience tells, and yeah, I do a poke test, but then again, I cook steaks a bit more often than most folks. A professional's experience though, sometimes you do a sneak and peek, if you're not as familiar with the cut, or you have a fairly large piece, then a thermometer is your friend. A New York isn't the same as a ribeye, and they cook slightly differently, and you have to practice a bit to get to know the feel, and it doesn't hurt to know the cut, and if you're the one doing the butchery, that helps. I cut a lot of ribeye and New Yorks, and each slab is a bit different, and it comes down to experience and knowing the cut to do a poke test. It's not so cut and dried as folks seem to think.
 
2013-06-13 12:34:46 AM
Myth#8: Any steak cooked beyond medium rare still tastes good.

/bloody as hell for me, thank you
 
2013-06-13 01:00:49 AM

mamoru: Myth#8: Any steak cooked beyond medium rare still tastes good.

/bloody as hell for me, thank you


myth #9
a million morons will post here with their anecdotal evidence that they will pretend is the same thing as fact.
for example, the first contestant already is QQing about the poke test.
sorry, but unless you have a lot of experience, poking = guessing.

myth #10
no one on the planet cares about your sauce or skillz. unless you are cooking at my house for free, yawnnnnn. isnt there a food site somewhere where you are king?
 
2013-06-13 01:15:33 AM

namatad: mamoru: Myth#8: Any steak cooked beyond medium rare still tastes good.

/bloody as hell for me, thank you

myth #9
a million morons will post here with their anecdotal evidence that they will pretend is the same thing as fact.
for example, the first contestant already is QQing about the poke test.
sorry, but unless you have a lot of experience, poking = guessing.

myth #10
no one on the planet cares about your sauce or skillz. unless you are cooking at my house for free, yawnnnnn. isnt there a food site somewhere where you are king?


myth #11 - charcoal is better than gas.  Most people can't get charcoal to provide even temperature, so the steak cooks unevenly.  Gas is better.
 
2013-06-13 01:53:58 AM
Myth # 12 - steak is overrated. Actually this is true.
 
2013-06-13 02:14:28 AM
Myth #8 - When the ketchup bottle is empty, stop pouring!
 
2013-06-13 02:43:28 AM

namatad: mamoru: Myth#8: Any steak cooked beyond medium rare still tastes good.

/bloody as hell for me, thank you

myth #9
a million morons will post here with their anecdotal evidence that they will pretend is the same thing as fact.
for example, the first contestant already is QQing about the poke test.
sorry, but unless you have a lot of experience, poking = guessing.


Pretty much. Cook a few thousand steaks, and you can guess pretty well. And even then, if you are working with a cut you're not familiar with, it takes some getting used to. Hanger steaks were a learning curve, because the texture is a little odd. There are a lot of factors. I do 20-40 steaks a night on average, and maybe twice that on a Friday and Saturday, and you get to know your cook times fairly well. I will disagree with the "flip often" comment in the article, but again, that's from a professional standpoint--cooking is the gentle art of leaving sh*t alone to do its thing. I don't like rearranging my grill too often, and part of that is simple math on how many actions I can perform in a minute, how many plates I can set up, how many tickets I can call off, and it's more a matter of time management. Screwing around with steaks, and flipping and reflipping, and resetting, that's less time to do the work necessary to get plates and tickets off my board. Most home cooks aren't doing 200 plates a night, and that is what sets professionals apart--it's about time management and efficiency. A home cook can afford to screw around a bit, a chef, not so much. There are time constraints, and that means that prep is an important part of things. Setting steaks out to "rest" before they go on the grill, not exactly conducive to getting tickets out of the window. Letting steaks rest after cooking, that IS important, and that has to do with how the muscle fibers react with heat, and letting a steak rest after cooking is what you want, unless you want folks to have a mess on the plate.
 
2013-06-13 03:25:25 AM
In the book HEAT (about a writer's stint in one of Mario Batali's restaurants) they used skewers stuck into the side of the cut of meat to determine doneness.  Stick the skewer in for a moment and then pull it out and touch it to your lip.  How hot it felt told you how far along the steak was cooked.
 
2013-06-13 04:29:28 AM
There is a lot at steak in this thread.

You have a beef with my pun?
 
2013-06-13 04:34:03 AM
Get food steak, salt lightly, set on fire, flip, eat.
 
2013-06-13 04:35:29 AM
Farking hipster foodies.
 
2013-06-13 04:42:42 AM

Mr. Coffee Nerves: Myth #8 - When the ketchup bottle is empty, stop pouring!


Good. I was just thinking about how I missed eating meat.  I haven't had a good steak in years, I can't even remember the last time yo be honest.
 
2013-06-13 04:44:11 AM

relaxitsjustme: Stick the skewer in for a moment and then pull it out and touch it to your lip.


Two things.  One:  That sounds like the script from a bad porno.  Two: Remind me never to eat at one of those unsanitary establishments.

TFA was wrong about the bone.  Bones add nothing to a steak other than extra weight for the butcher to charge you.  He was wrong about cutting to check, also.  If you cut it open while it's cooking, or cut it and then throw it back on, that place where you cut into it will cook faster than the unbreached meat, making it uneven.  Thermometers are not quite as bad, but still no good; don't breach the meat unless it's a roast and you're cooking the whole thing to full doneness.
 
2013-06-13 04:44:42 AM
How about: "The only proper doneness for a steak is the doneness that I prefer.  Anyone who likes their steak cooked to a different degree is a moron!"

Man, I get tired of hearing that one.

/medium-rare to medium, I'm not fussy about it.
 
2013-06-13 04:52:58 AM
Myth #8 - Men can discuss rationally, sanely and without charges of grievous bodily harm the relative merits of their personal methods for cooking steak.
 
2013-06-13 04:53:19 AM
Heat up a piece of cast iron as hot as you can, salt/pepper, sear one minute per side, two minutes in a hot oven, rest for a spell, enjoy. Don't over think it.
 
2013-06-13 04:54:26 AM
I really enjoy when my waiter brother in law is chowing down on McDonalds telling me about how his customers have absolutely no taste or understanding of steak because they ordered it X or Y way with Z condiment.

The Best steak is one that I enjoy.
 
2013-06-13 04:56:25 AM
so the same site that says don't bother to let the steak warm up at room temp has another article that says you should start with low heat then on really high heat
 
2013-06-13 04:57:44 AM
hmmm...  going by this meat-o-graph I must be overcooking my steaks just a bit.

www.seriouseats.com

I cook mine over an old General Electric J79 Sportsman Turbo Afterburner Grill.

They usually come out looking like this...

dsp.imageg.net

Now that's good eatin'!
 
2013-06-13 04:59:17 AM
If my steak isn't exactly 132 degrees I will strap you to a chair and make you watch as I murder your family and burn your house down with you in it.

/average response
//as long as it isnt burnt or still cold I'm not going to complain
 
2013-06-13 05:05:49 AM

bedtundy: hmmm...  going by this meat-o-graph I must be overcooking my steaks just a bit.

[www.seriouseats.com image 500x195]

I cook mine over an old General Electric J79 Sportsman Turbo Afterburner Grill.

They usually come out looking like this...

[dsp.imageg.net image 275x279]

Now that's good eatin'!


You turn meat into ding dongs? Or is it a puck, I can't tell?
 
2013-06-13 05:12:05 AM
There needs to be a nice crispy edge to a medium steak.

Nothing else will do, unless you are grilling some sort of exotic like elk, bison, or ostrich.
 
2013-06-13 05:19:05 AM
What I do:

- Take steak out of fridge 30 minutes before grilling.
- Salt and pepper the steak, lightly oil the grate.
- Throw steak on for 3 minutes.
- Flip and grill for another 3 minutes.
- Take off and let rest for 5 minutes.

/Off to RTFA now.
 
2013-06-13 05:28:15 AM
My recipe:

-Find someones cow
-Hit cow in head with steel pipe
-Start gnawing on the unconscious cow
 
2013-06-13 05:34:03 AM
meh, steak
 
2013-06-13 05:42:45 AM

Public Savant: bedtundy: hmmm...  going by this meat-o-graph I must be overcooking my steaks just a bit.

[www.seriouseats.com image 500x195]

I cook mine over an old General Electric J79 Sportsman Turbo Afterburner Grill.

They usually come out looking like this...

[dsp.imageg.net image 275x279]

Now that's good eatin'!

You turn meat into ding dongs? Or is it a puck, I can't tell?


heh... it's a puck, but I can see how it looks like a ding dong.

/now I miss hostess snacks even more.
 
2013-06-13 05:54:22 AM
1. Cutting it to check.  Depending on how your meat is cooking, it can dry up the area a bit.  Depending on the size of the steak this can lose enough uniformity to the point some will find it takes away from the whole experience. (unless it's really close to being done and not much cooking is needed).

2. The bone(and things attached as mentioned) do flavor the meat, but it's not always as noticeable depending on how it's cooked.  Author states he likes the taste of the meat closer to the bone(as flavored by bits on the bone), ergo, he's fooling himself a smidge.  Anyone who specifically does not like the taste of the fat/gristle/cartilage/etc can tell you that it does affect the meat.  It's also just not the meat close to the bone.  This is very noticable if it's done in a pan and the meat simmers in it's own juices, the taste spreads.

Beef does have it's own flavor which can mask the situation, but it's very obvious in chicken.

Take a well trimmed breast fillet and boil it(I do this for a variety of things where the chicken gets spiced or sauced later, or cubed and dropped in a cheese dip or melted philly style sammige).  Compare to a baked whole chicken's breast meat.  Very different.

My parents make chicken soup with whole pieces of chicken(Ie meat on the bone, legs, thighs, etc).  I call it chicken bone soup because it's so earthy tasting as to be overpowering.  It's pervasive, meat is not as impermeable as people think.

Here's the thing.  Bone is not solid, it's porous, and many times hollow(but with marrow).  A lot of what's in those spaces oozes out when cooked.(smooth and waxy when raw, rough and dry when cooked, all that material went somewhere...)  You won't notice it a lot on the grill where it can drip right off, but in a pan, even in a batch of ribs, and it's noticeable to one who happens to be able to taste the difference, more so for people who dislike the taste.

Author sounds like someone with technical skill, but not exactly a super-taster.

3. Need to thaw your meat?  If it's not too thick, run a sink full of hot water, drop in the meat(if it's wrapped in plastic.)
We do this with frozen bacon in the vac-sealed plastic.  As long as you don't have too good of a water heater, it shouldn't do anything to the meat. I imagine it could work with steaks that aren't super thick, but you'd have to saran-wrap them even if they come on the styrofoam tray w/ plastic wrap(too much air and insulation from the tray), and not lie it flat on the bottom, prop it up with the drain from the other sink or something.

(not entirely sure you couldn't drop in bare meat, not that much of an expert)
 
2013-06-13 06:00:54 AM

Tealeaf: How about: "The only proper doneness for a steak is the doneness that I prefer.  Anyone who likes their steak cooked to a different degree is a moron!"

Man, I get tired of hearing that one.

/medium-rare to medium, I'm not fussy about it.


That is the proper doneness, since that is the doneness that I also prefer.  I've given you a +smart.
 
2013-06-13 06:16:22 AM
3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-06-13 06:27:13 AM
Myth #1: "You should let a thick steak rest at room temperature before you cook it."
The Reality:  While it's true that slowly bringing a steak up to its final serving temperature will promote more even cooking.

And that's where I stopped reading. Does this farking person know what "Myth" means?
 
2013-06-13 06:31:22 AM

abhorrent1: Myth #1: "You should let a thick steak rest at room temperature before you cook it."
The Reality:  While it's true that slowly bringing a steak up to its final serving temperature will promote more even cooking.

And that's where I stopped reading. Does this farking person know what "Myth" means?


He went on to say that letting it sit at room temperature for any reasonable length of time doesn't bring the core up to serving temperature.

See what happens when you stop reading?  You look foolish.
 
2013-06-13 06:32:54 AM

bunner: Get food steak, salt lightly, set on near fire, flip, eat.


ftfy
 
2013-06-13 06:40:53 AM
What about if she doesn't eat meat but she still likes the bone?
 
2013-06-13 06:41:16 AM
All steak must be medium-well, which looks like TFA writer's version of "well". That is not a well-done steak, a well-done steak is not farking red inside, it's a very pale pink. I had to open the image on my other screen just to make sure I wasn't seeing things.

His idea of "rare" is just farking raw. I don't understand people who eat raw meat, they must be those people who still have Neanderthal DNA.
 
2013-06-13 06:44:17 AM
After you cook a couple a dozen steaks a day for years, you figure a couple of things out about them. First, all steaks behave differently--it's nature, not McDonalds. So any rules are, essentially, useless. Next, after awhile you can look at a steak and figure out its doneness by the amount of liquid on its surface. When in doubt a good thermometer will tell you where it's at. As for when to season, if you can tell the difference between a steak seasoned before, after, or during cooking you are either an idiot savant or lying. The only golden rule re cooking is to stop cooking it a little before the desired doneness and let it rest 5 minutes or so.

That being said, a good steak is about sourcing, not cooking. There is nothing to cooking them, so you need to find a consistent supplier that isn't fudging on the number of days it was aged. Basically most steaks the general public eats are not dry aged, so they are staring with an inferior product, and will end up with a pretty bland meal. Even Costco "prime" meat is a waste of money unless aged. Go out and get a 32 day dry aged NY and you will see what I mean.
 
2013-06-13 06:45:00 AM

Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy: All steak must be medium-well, which looks like TFA writer's version of "well". That is not a well-done steak, a well-done steak is not farking red inside, it's a very pale pink. I had to open the image on my other screen just to make sure I wasn't seeing things.

His idea of "rare" is just farking raw. I don't understand people who eat raw meat, they must be those people who still have Neanderthal DNA.


Make sense.  Neanderthals didn't yet develop a taste for show leather.
 
2013-06-13 06:45:36 AM

sendtodave: show


shoe

/dammitsomuch
 
2013-06-13 06:57:42 AM
Hrmm... so should I listen to Gordon Ramsay or some random blogger?
 
2013-06-13 07:07:27 AM
Well done with A1 for this supertaster.
 
2013-06-13 07:11:06 AM

whither_apophis: Myth # 12 - steak is overrated. Actually this is true.


You don't come to a steak porn thread and blather your godless vegan ways!
 
2013-06-13 07:17:24 AM
This is all opinion.  However, I have found in that more people are of the opinion that the steaks I cook off the heat over charcoal with mesquite are damn good.    There is no flipping at all.  The meat is slow cooked just like bbq ribs.  After doing this for a while, the idea of cooking it on a grill and flipping it seems totally asinine.
 
2013-06-13 07:21:19 AM

Authentic Chop Suey: After you cook a couple a dozen steaks a day for years, you figure a couple of things out about them. First, all steaks behave differently--it's nature, not McDonalds. So any rules are, essentially, useless. Next, after awhile you can look at a steak and figure out its doneness by the amount of liquid on its surface. When in doubt a good thermometer will tell you where it's at. As for when to season, if you can tell the difference between a steak seasoned before, after, or during cooking you are either an idiot savant or lying. The only golden rule re cooking is to stop cooking it a little before the desired doneness and let it rest 5 minutes or so.

That being said, a good steak is about sourcing, not cooking. There is nothing to cooking them, so you need to find a consistent supplier that isn't fudging on the number of days it was aged. Basically most steaks the general public eats are not dry aged, so they are staring with an inferior product, and will end up with a pretty bland meal. Even Costco "prime" meat is a waste of money unless aged. Go out and get a 32 day dry aged NY and you will see what I mean.


i39.tinypic.com
 
2013-06-13 07:22:48 AM

Authentic Chop Suey: After you cook a couple a dozen steaks a day for years, you figure a couple of things out about them. First, all steaks behave differently--it's nature, not McDonalds. So any rules are, essentially, useless. Next, after awhile you can look at a steak and figure out its doneness by the amount of liquid on its surface. When in doubt a good thermometer will tell you where it's at. As for when to season, if you can tell the difference between a steak seasoned before, after, or during cooking you are either an idiot savant or lying. The only golden rule re cooking is to stop cooking it a little before the desired doneness and let it rest 5 minutes or so.

That being said, a good steak is about sourcing, not cooking. There is nothing to cooking them, so you need to find a consistent supplier that isn't fudging on the number of days it was aged. Basically most steaks the general public eats are not dry aged, so they are staring with an inferior product, and will end up with a pretty bland meal. Even Costco "prime" meat is a waste of money unless aged. Go out and get a 32 day dry aged NY and you will see what I mean.


I think you've nailed it.  I think a lot of folks who have a ritual they perform that supposedly produces the best steak in the world did it once with a steak and it turned out better than anything they had previously done so they figured they had discovered the secret formula.  As you point out, there are so many variables that no standardized set of rituals and incantations will produce the same results.  One needs to be able to evaluate the steak, the fire, if you're cooking outdoors you need to understand the effect of weather extremes, even the kind of salt used has a dramatic effect.

Probably your best point is the importance of sourcing.  You can get a dozen New York Strips from a dozen different sources and the differences can be dramatic.  Most good butcher shops have a single producer from whom they get most of their better cuts.  That, plus the fact that the shop will treat the beef in a consistent manner, reduces variability for that shop.  If you want to grill great steaks, try to control for as many variables as possible and then develop a method that works.

But cooking steaks is kind of like fattening the steer. Sure, there are plenty of formulas about what to feed and how to feed but if you really want to get consistent quality, start with the genetics and then have enough experience to look at that steer and know what adjustments to make.
 
2013-06-13 07:25:08 AM

God Is My Co-Pirate: Authentic Chop Suey: After you cook a couple a dozen steaks a day for years, you figure a couple of things out about them. First, all steaks behave differently--it's nature, not McDonalds. So any rules are, essentially, useless. Next, after awhile you can look at a steak and figure out its doneness by the amount of liquid on its surface. When in doubt a good thermometer will tell you where it's at. As for when to season, if you can tell the difference between a steak seasoned before, after, or during cooking you are either an idiot savant or lying. The only golden rule re cooking is to stop cooking it a little before the desired doneness and let it rest 5 minutes or so.

That being said, a good steak is about sourcing, not cooking. There is nothing to cooking them, so you need to find a consistent supplier that isn't fudging on the number of days it was aged. Basically most steaks the general public eats are not dry aged, so they are staring with an inferior product, and will end up with a pretty bland meal. Even Costco "prime" meat is a waste of money unless aged. Go out and get a 32 day dry aged NY and you will see what I mean.


Yup. That'll do ya.
 
2013-06-13 07:25:48 AM

Boloxor the Insipid: This is all opinion.  However, I have found in that more people are of the opinion that the steaks I cook off the heat over charcoal with mesquite are damn good.    There is no flipping at all.  The meat is slow cooked just like bbq ribs.  After doing this for a while, the idea of cooking it on a grill and flipping it seems totally asinine.


Would that technically be smoking, not grilling?
 
2013-06-13 07:27:19 AM
Pfff... Steak is for the common folk. I only eat endangered species from the rain forest until they become extinct. Hell, I clone extinct animals just to eat them to extinction.
 
2013-06-13 07:31:02 AM

Boloxor the Insipid: This is all opinion.  However, I have found in that more people are of the opinion that the steaks I cook off the heat over charcoal with mesquite are damn good.    There is no flipping at all.  The meat is slow cooked just like bbq ribs.  After doing this for a while, the idea of cooking it on a grill and flipping it seems totally asinine.


Please tell me this is a troll.
 
2013-06-13 07:35:33 AM

Lsherm: myth #11 - charcoal is better than gas.  Most people can't get charcoal to provide even temperature, so the steak cooks unevenly.  Gas is better.


I am not saying charcoal or gas is better, but if you are used to doing it, there is nothing preventing an even temperature and you can get a different flavor from the meat. So, no myth here if you prefer charcoal flavor differences. I have no problem with either method of cooking because steak is awesome.
 
2013-06-13 07:38:09 AM

mamoru: Myth#8: Any steak cooked beyond medium rare still tastes good.

/bloody as hell for me, thank you


Myth #9: Steak still has blood in it*

*beyond some trivial amount

/myoglobin is what you are seeing, which is found in muscle tissue
 
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