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(NBC News)   "I could perceive the dead bodies of my crew were nearby. I could smell them. The fish came in and began eating the bodies. I could hear the sound. It was horror"   (worldnews.nbcnews.com ) divider line
    More: Scary  
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21354 clicks; posted to Main » on 13 Jun 2013 at 2:26 AM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



79 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-06-12 11:57:16 PM  
25.media.tumblr.com
 
2013-06-13 12:35:24 AM  
b.vimeocdn.com
 
2013-06-13 12:38:52 AM  
i44.tinypic.com
 
2013-06-13 02:22:58 AM  
img834.imageshack.us
 
2013-06-13 02:23:01 AM  
media.thedenverchannel.com
 
2013-06-13 02:29:32 AM  
images3.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2013-06-13 02:29:52 AM  
now that would suck
 
2013-06-13 02:30:13 AM  
i314.photobucket.com
 
2013-06-13 02:33:28 AM  
Bullschitt.  It sank because of all the money in the hold.
 
2013-06-13 02:33:48 AM  

Omahawg: now that would suck


Yeah.

The article is poorly written, but when they said he had to sit in a decompression chamber?

That farking boat wasn't just capsized. It rolled and SANK. Damn.

And the only sensations for him in the pitch black were the smells of the dead bodies, the fish moving around, the sound of the fish eating the dead bodies.

That would have sucked.
 
2013-06-13 02:34:13 AM  
2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-06-13 02:34:27 AM  
I don't think he'll be returning back to the sea. What ship's crew would want a cook that was the only crew member to survive a sinking ship? Especially in Nigeria, I bet they look at him as bad luck.
 
2013-06-13 02:36:20 AM  

legion_of_doo: Omahawg: now that would suck

Yeah.

The article is poorly written, but when they said he had to sit in a decompression chamber?

That farking boat wasn't just capsized. It rolled and SANK. Damn.

And the only sensations for him in the pitch black were the smells of the dead bodies, the fish moving around, the sound of the fish eating the dead bodies.

That would have sucked.


My thoughts too when it was mentioned he had to decompress for 60 hours.
 
2013-06-13 02:38:48 AM  
This one time I went snorkeling and water went up my nose. I'm pretty extreme like that.
 
2013-06-13 02:43:10 AM  
I wonder how often something like this happens, and the person doesn't get rescued.
 
2013-06-13 02:44:18 AM  
Found a better article:

http://oilprice.com/Latest-Energy-News/World-News/Ships-Cook-Found-A li ve-in-Sunken-Tug-Boat-off-the-Nigerian-Coast.html

The divers gave Okene a suit, helmet, and mask and after spending more than 60 hours in the cold, dark waters trapped under the ship he finally reached the surface.

Another one told the depth was 100 feet.
 
2013-06-13 02:46:19 AM  

anotar: legion_of_doo: Omahawg: now that would suck

Yeah.

The article is poorly written, but when they said he had to sit in a decompression chamber?

That farking boat wasn't just capsized. It rolled and SANK. Damn.

And the only sensations for him in the pitch black were the smells of the dead bodies, the fish moving around, the sound of the fish eating the dead bodies.

That would have sucked.

My thoughts too when it was mentioned he had to decompress for 60 hours.


Guy is going to be having nightmares for a very long time, like that girl rescued from the factory in Bangladesh. I cringed when I read the article, poor bastard.
 
2013-06-13 02:48:47 AM  
Did the tiger survive?
 
2013-06-13 02:51:35 AM  
Wonder if he has trouble using a  toilet now.
 
2013-06-13 02:56:56 AM  

Dahnkster: This one time I went snorkeling and water went up my nose. I'm pretty extreme like that.


I'm sorry for your loss. It's hard to hear stories like that.
 
2013-06-13 03:03:33 AM  
I smell a made-for-tv movie.
 
2013-06-13 03:09:07 AM  
I'm not even scared of swimming in the open sea. Well not until now.
 
2013-06-13 03:12:20 AM  
Holy jesus crap, I can't imagine.
 
2013-06-13 03:12:21 AM  
i.imgur.com
 
2013-06-13 03:13:30 AM  

Jirafa: I wonder how often something like this happens, and the person doesn't get rescued.


Pearl Harbor springs to mind

At first, everyone thought it was a piece of loose rigging slapping against the wrecked hull of the USS West Virginia.

Bang. Bang.

To the survivors on land, it was just another noise amid the carnage of Pearl Harbor a day after the Dec. 7, 1941, attack. Like the sound of fireboats squirting water on the USS Arizona. Or the hammers chipping into the overturned hull of the Oklahoma.

But they realized the grim truth the next morning, in the quiet dawn. Someone was still alive, trapped deep in the forward hull of the sunken battleship.

Bang. Bang.

The Marines standing guard covered their ears. There was nothing anyone could do.
When salvage crews raised the West Virginia six months later, they found the bodies of three men huddled in an airtight storeroom: Ronald Endicott, 18; Clifford Olds, 20; and Louis "Buddy" Costin, 21.

But the most haunting discovery was the calendar.

Sixteen days had been crossed off in red pencil. The young sailors had marked their time, not knowing what had happened to their ship or that their country was at war.

For 54 years, their story has been told in hushed tones among the West Virginia's survivors. It has become a symbol of courage and perseverance for these aging men.

Few people knew the whole truth. The Navy never told the families how long their loved ones had survived. And for those brothers and sisters who eventually found out, the truth was so devastating they kept it a secret. Even from their own parents.


http://community.seattletimes.nwsource.com/archive/?date=19951207&sl ug =2156455

/read the rest at your own risk
 
2013-06-13 03:23:08 AM  

realityVSperception: Jirafa: I wonder how often something like this happens, and the person doesn't get rescued.

Pearl Harbor springs to mind

At first, everyone thought it was a piece of loose rigging slapping against the wrecked hull of the USS West Virginia.

Bang. Bang.

To the survivors on land, it was just another noise amid the carnage of Pearl Harbor a day after the Dec. 7, 1941, attack. Like the sound of fireboats squirting water on the USS Arizona. Or the hammers chipping into the overturned hull of the Oklahoma.

But they realized the grim truth the next morning, in the quiet dawn. Someone was still alive, trapped deep in the forward hull of the sunken battleship.

Bang. Bang.

The Marines standing guard covered their ears. There was nothing anyone could do.
When salvage crews raised the West Virginia six months later, they found the bodies of three men huddled in an airtight storeroom: Ronald Endicott, 18; Clifford Olds, 20; and Louis "Buddy" Costin, 21.

But the most haunting discovery was the calendar.

Sixteen days had been crossed off in red pencil. The young sailors had marked their time, not knowing what had happened to their ship or that their country was at war.

For 54 years, their story has been told in hushed tones among the West Virginia's survivors. It has become a symbol of courage and perseverance for these aging men.

Few people knew the whole truth. The Navy never told the families how long their loved ones had survived. And for those brothers and sisters who eventually found out, the truth was so devastating they kept it a secret. Even from their own parents.

http://community.seattletimes.nwsource.com/archive/?date=19951207&sl ug =2156455

/read the rest at your own risk


Meh.  They just did not try hard enough to get out.
 
2013-06-13 03:25:36 AM  

Jirafa: I wonder how often something like this happens, and the person doesn't get rescued.


or the russian sub Kursk

There has been much debate over how long the sailors survived. Russian sources say that they would have died very quickly. The Dutch recovery team report a widely believed two- to three-hour survival time in the least affected sternmost compartment In normal operation, water leaks into a stationary Oscar-II craft around the propeller shafts, and at 100 metres (330 ft) depth it would have been impossible to prevent. Others point out that many superoxide chemical cartridges, used to absorb carbon dioxide and provide oxygen in an emergency, were found to have been used when the craft was recovered, suggesting survival for several days. The cartridges seem to have been the final cause of death: a cartridge appears to have come in contact with oily sea water, causing a chemical reaction and flash fire. The official investigation into the disaster showed that some men survived this fire by plunging under water (fire marks on bulkheads indicate the water was at waist level at the time) but the fire would have used up any remaining oxygen in the air, causing death by asphyxiation.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_submarine_Kursk_explosion
 
2013-06-13 03:26:55 AM  

odenen: I smell a made-for-tv movie.


James Franco trapped in a submerged tugboat restroom for 127 hours and forced to pinch off his own loaf. I wonder if Lilo is available to play the turd.
 
2013-06-13 03:32:46 AM  

Dahnkster: This one time I went snorkeling and water went up my nose. I'm pretty extreme like that.


This one time, I slipped in the shower. So I know exactly how this guy must feel.
 
2013-06-13 03:43:12 AM  

realityVSperception: Jirafa: I wonder how often something like this happens, and the person doesn't get rescued.

Pearl Harbor springs to mind

At first, everyone thought it was a piece of loose rigging slapping against the wrecked hull of the USS West Virginia.

Bang. Bang.

To the survivors on land, it was just another noise amid the carnage of Pearl Harbor a day after the Dec. 7, 1941, attack. Like the sound of fireboats squirting water on the USS Arizona. Or the hammers chipping into the overturned hull of the Oklahoma.

But they realized the grim truth the next morning, in the quiet dawn. Someone was still alive, trapped deep in the forward hull of the sunken battleship.

Bang. Bang.

The Marines standing guard covered their ears. There was nothing anyone could do.
When salvage crews raised the West Virginia six months later, they found the bodies of three men huddled in an airtight storeroom: Ronald Endicott, 18; Clifford Olds, 20; and Louis "Buddy" Costin, 21.

But the most haunting discovery was the calendar.

Sixteen days had been crossed off in red pencil. The young sailors had marked their time, not knowing what had happened to their ship or that their country was at war.

For 54 years, their story has been told in hushed tones among the West Virginia's survivors. It has become a symbol of courage and perseverance for these aging men.

Few people knew the whole truth. The Navy never told the families how long their loved ones had survived. And for those brothers and sisters who eventually found out, the truth was so devastating they kept it a secret. Even from their own parents.

http://community.seattletimes.nwsource.com/archive/?date=19951207&sl ug =2156455

/read the rest at your own risk


"Louis' sister, Edna Heil, first learned the truth about his death from a reporter last week. "It is so sad, it just breaks you up," she said.
Her brother Harlan, now 70, had kept his secret. "I just wanted to spare them the grief," he said, fighting tears."


Wow. Fark that reporter. What a piece of shiat.
 
2013-06-13 03:48:14 AM  

realityVSperception: http://community.seattletimes.nwsource.com/archive/?date=19951207&sl ug =2156455

/read the rest at your own risk


I do apologize for sounding cynical but why would reading the rest be at my own risk?  I just completed the article and could not understand anything but the logical choice they made.

It was not the easiest way to die, but it was the only choice.
 
2013-06-13 03:49:13 AM  

realityVSperception: http://community.seattletimes.nwsource.com/archive/?date=19951207&sl ug =2156455


Holy crap!  I kind of wish I hadn't read that.
 
2013-06-13 04:00:32 AM  
That is crazy. Thank you submitter.
 
2013-06-13 04:03:06 AM  
That guys going to have nightmares? What about me?

/ what about raven?!
// obscure?
 
2013-06-13 04:22:03 AM  
Nope.
 
2013-06-13 04:24:38 AM  

realityVSperception: Jirafa: I wonder how often something like this happens, and the person doesn't get rescued.

Pearl Harbor springs to mind

At first, everyone thought it was a piece of loose rigging slapping against the wrecked hull of the USS West Virginia.

Bang. Bang.

To the survivors on land, it was just another noise amid the carnage of Pearl Harbor a day after the Dec. 7, 1941, attack. Like the sound of fireboats squirting water on the USS Arizona. Or the hammers chipping into the overturned hull of the Oklahoma.

But they realized the grim truth the next morning, in the quiet dawn. Someone was still alive, trapped deep in the forward hull of the sunken battleship.

Bang. Bang.

The Marines standing guard covered their ears. There was nothing anyone could do.
When salvage crews raised the West Virginia six months later, they found the bodies of three men huddled in an airtight storeroom: Ronald Endicott, 18; Clifford Olds, 20; and Louis "Buddy" Costin, 21.

But the most haunting discovery was the calendar.

Sixteen days had been crossed off in red pencil. The young sailors had marked their time, not knowing what had happened to their ship or that their country was at war.

For 54 years, their story has been told in hushed tones among the West Virginia's survivors. It has become a symbol of courage and perseverance for these aging men.

Few people knew the whole truth. The Navy never told the families how long their loved ones had survived. And for those brothers and sisters who eventually found out, the truth was so devastating they kept it a secret. Even from their own parents.

http://community.seattletimes.nwsource.com/archive/?date=19951207&sl ug =2156455

/read the rest at your own risk


They were able to last 16 days in an airtight room?? Wouldn't their oxygen have run out much sooner? (I mean, I'm not a science talking guy...)
 
2013-06-13 05:07:31 AM  

B.L.Z. Bub: They were able to last 16 days in an airtight room?? Wouldn't their oxygen have run out much sooner? (I mean, I'm not a science talking guy...)


A valid point.  Would be interesting if they had just marked a bunch of days in a dark humor.  I mean... its not like there would be much to do in there...
 
2013-06-13 06:08:35 AM  
I understand his feelings as part of my navy training in SERE was a pow camp and experiencing the various aspects of the enemy's tortures, etc.  I was waterboarded and it terrified me so much that I gave my scuba stuff to the church's yard sale and never went swimming again.  It took me 18 months before I could put my face under the showerhead again.
 
2013-06-13 06:16:01 AM  
 
2013-06-13 06:32:52 AM  
i.imgur.com
 
2013-06-13 06:40:56 AM  

phojo1946: I understand his feelings as part of my navy training in SERE was a pow camp and experiencing the various aspects of the enemy's tortures, etc.  I was waterboarded and it terrified me so much that I gave my scuba stuff to the church's yard sale and never went swimming again.  It took me 18 months before I could put my face under the showerhead again.


Ha, look at you, scared of a little water!

Torture.

Water torture.
 
2013-06-13 06:52:42 AM  
He's lucky the Deep Ones didn't find him before the divers did.

/Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn
 
2013-06-13 06:53:25 AM  
They groaned, they stirred, they all uprose,
Nor spake, nor moved their eyes;
It had been strange, even in a dream,
To have seen those dead men rise.

The helmsman steered, the ship moved on;
Yet never a breeze up blew;
The mariners all 'gan work the ropes,
Where they were wont to do;
They raised their limbs like lifeless tools -
We were a ghastly crew.
 
2013-06-13 07:22:29 AM  

Godscrack: [25.media.tumblr.com image 500x250]


Well, that didn't take long...
 
2013-06-13 07:31:38 AM  

sendtodave: phojo1946: I understand his feelings as part of my navy training in SERE was a pow camp and experiencing the various aspects of the enemy's tortures, etc.  I was waterboarded and it terrified me so much that I gave my scuba stuff to the church's yard sale and never went swimming again.  It took me 18 months before I could put my face under the showerhead again.

Ha, look at you, scared of a little water!

Torture.

Water torture.


It's not torture.  It's just blowing off steam.
 
2013-06-13 07:34:12 AM  

bmihura: I'm not even scared of swimming in the open sea. Well not until now.


Swimming in the open sea is no big deal. It's taking a crap in a tugboat that'll kill you.
 
2013-06-13 07:43:25 AM  

AngryJailhouseFistfark: bmihura: I'm not even scared of swimming in the open sea. Well not until now.

Swimming in the open sea is no big deal. It's taking a crap in a tugboat that'll kill  save you.


FTFY
 
2013-06-13 07:51:16 AM  
Holy shiatballs.
 
2013-06-13 07:56:06 AM  
Please to assist in exportation of man presently trapped in Nigeria.
 
2013-06-13 07:57:04 AM  
I don't know that I believe this tug was on the sea floor. Sounds more like that was a miss-understanding or embellishment. I imagine it was capsized and still on the surface.
 
2013-06-13 08:00:41 AM  

goatleggedfellow: [i.imgur.com image 200x200]


Came for The Black Freighter, thanks.
 
2013-06-13 08:02:17 AM  

Mobius strip of human stupidity: I don't know that I believe this tug was on the sea floor. Sounds more like that was a miss-understanding or embellishment. I imagine it was capsized and still on the surface.


I'm thinking he got a little water splashed on his ass when dropping a deuce and now he wants to tell his story. Some of the details got embellished in the translation.
 
2013-06-13 08:02:22 AM  

booger42: AngryJailhouseFistfark: bmihura: I'm not even scared of swimming in the open sea. Well not until now.

Swimming in the open sea is no big deal. It's taking a crap in a tugboat that'll kill  save you.

FTFY


Oh, save. Right. But it'll be traumatic, just the same.
 
2013-06-13 08:06:54 AM  

Mobius strip of human stupidity: I don't know that I believe this tug was on the sea floor. Sounds more like that was a miss-understanding or embellishment. I imagine it was capsized and still on the surface.


He wouldn't have needed decompression if it was on the surface.
 
2013-06-13 08:24:12 AM  
flak attack: Mobius strip of human stupidity: I don't know that I believe this tug was on the sea floor. Sounds more like that was a miss-understanding or embellishment. I imagine it was capsized and still on the surface.

He wouldn't have needed decompression if it was on the surface.


If you're stuck 20' (a reasonable guesstimate)under then you most certainly do need decompression.  Divers have been killed via embolism when attempting a landing in shallow water, a wave passes over and they accidentally hold their breath.
The biggest increase in pressure occurs in the first (+,-) 30' feet or so as the ambient pressure doubles.  I don't fark around with this ever.  At one point in my life I could recite the dive tables from memory.

www.naui.org

Diving, it aint all pretty fish and naked wimmins
 
2013-06-13 08:32:56 AM  

flak attack: Mobius strip of human stupidity: I don't know that I believe this tug was on the sea floor. Sounds more like that was a miss-understanding or embellishment. I imagine it was capsized and still on the surface.

He wouldn't have needed decompression if it was on the surface.


His depth under the water was irrelevant. The entire weight of the vessel was pushing down on the pocket compressing the air. He was breathing gas at a very high pressure and would have required extensive decompression time on the way out. And a recreational dive table was not gonna cut it.
 
2013-06-13 08:45:10 AM  
Monkeyfark Ridiculous:
/read the rest at your own risk


This is at odds with a book I read by Cdr. Edward Raymer, one of the salvage divers at Pearl Harbor.  His crew surveyed the  West Virginiaafter the attack, with specific instructions to listen for hammering.  According to Raymer's account, they never heard any pounding because they were unable to get near the part of  West Virginia's hull where the trapped sailors were- it was up against the  Tennessee.

http://www.amazon.com/Descent-Darkness-Pearl-Harbor-Story/dp/0891417 45 1
 
2013-06-13 08:49:57 AM  
Marcintosh:  At one point in my life I could recite the dive tables from memory.

Me too- but it seems the YMCA taught differet tables back in 1980.  I remember that 60 feet was 60 minutes, 70 was 50, 80 was 40, and 90 was 30 (all add up to 120).  This was supposedly from the U.S. Navy tables, which gave you a 95% chance of NOT getting bent.

I'm guessing NAUI plays it slightly more conservatively- unlike the Navy, they can be sued.
 
2013-06-13 08:55:21 AM  

skinink: I don't think he'll be returning back to the sea. What ship's crew would want a cook that was the only crew member to survive a sinking ship? Especially in Nigeria, I bet they look at him as bad luck.


Nigeria please
 
2013-06-13 09:00:41 AM  

Marcintosh: flak attack: Mobius strip of human stupidity: I don't know that I believe this tug was on the sea floor. Sounds more like that was a miss-understanding or embellishment. I imagine it was capsized and still on the surface.

He wouldn't have needed decompression if it was on the surface.

If you're stuck 20' (a reasonable guesstimate)under then you most certainly do need decompression.  Divers have been killed via embolism when attempting a landing in shallow water, a wave passes over and they accidentally hold their breath.
The biggest increase in pressure occurs in the first (+,-) 30' feet or so as the ambient pressure doubles.  I don't fark around with this ever.  At one point in my life I could recite the dive tables from memory.

[www.naui.org image 375x332]

Diving, it aint all pretty fish and naked wimmins


I don't understand that chart.  Am I just stupid?  What does the A-L mean?  What if im an L diving at 130 feet?

/they told me no question was a stupid question i swear
 
2013-06-13 09:02:40 AM  

Dahnkster: odenen: I smell a made-for-tv movie.

James Franco trapped in a submerged tugboat restroom for 127 hours and forced to pinch off his own loaf. I wonder if Lilo is available to play the turd.


Oh dear God ... don't do that ... lol a lot
 
2013-06-13 09:07:32 AM  
horrorcultfilms.co.uk
Herbie Robinson from Cleveland. Baseball player. Boatswain's mate. I thought he was asleep. I reached over to wake him up. He bobbed up, down in the water just like a kinda top. Upended. Well, he'd been bitten in half below the waist.
 
2013-06-13 09:11:18 AM  
I could film that movie.  "Lights out......camera.....action!"

But seriously, being trapped in a boat 100 feet down in total darkness had to be a piece of hell.  As a diver going into a sunken boat and finding bodies is equally bad....but imagine groping around in the dark bumping into dead things, and then.....one of them grabs you back and your flashlight hits the man's face with his wide open blinking eyes.  Talk about pooping in your drysuit!
 
2013-06-13 09:16:34 AM  
jfivealive: Marcintosh: flak attack: Mobius strip of human stupidity: I don't know that I believe this tug was on the sea floor. Sounds more like that was a miss-understanding or embellishment. I imagine it was capsized and still on the surface.

He wouldn't have needed decompression if it was on the surface.

If you're stuck 20' (a reasonable guesstimate)under then you most certainly do need decompression.  Divers have been killed via embolism when attempting a landing in shallow water, a wave passes over and they accidentally hold their breath.
The biggest increase in pressure occurs in the first (+,-) 30' feet or so as the ambient pressure doubles.  I don't fark around with this ever.  At one point in my life I could recite the dive tables from memory.

[www.naui.org image 375x332]

Diving, it aint all pretty fish and naked wimmins


I don't understand that chart.  Am I just stupid?  What does the A-L mean?  What if im an L diving at 130 feet?

/they told me no question was a stupid question i swear


Agreed, that isn't the easiest to unnerstan chart.
Try this on for size. It deals with the PADI chart but they're all similar
http://www.instructables.com/id/Reading-Dive-Tables/step2/Side-1-Tab le -1-Left-Side/
 
2013-06-13 09:33:15 AM  

camelclub: I could film that movie.  "Lights out......camera.....action!"

But seriously, being trapped in a boat 100 feet down in total darkness had to be a piece of hell.  As a diver going into a sunken boat and finding bodies is equally bad....but imagine groping around in the dark bumping into dead things, and then.....one of them grabs you back and your flashlight hits the man's face with his wide open blinking eyes.  Talk about pooping in your drysuit!


I'm gonna need a bigger suit.
 
2013-06-13 10:23:55 AM  

jfivealive: Marcintosh: flak attack: Mobius strip of human stupidity: I don't know that I believe this tug was on the sea floor. Sounds more like that was a miss-understanding or embellishment. I imagine it was capsized and still on the surface.

He wouldn't have needed decompression if it was on the surface.

If you're stuck 20' (a reasonable guesstimate)under then you most certainly do need decompression.  Divers have been killed via embolism when attempting a landing in shallow water, a wave passes over and they accidentally hold their breath.
The biggest increase in pressure occurs in the first (+,-) 30' feet or so as the ambient pressure doubles.  I don't fark around with this ever.  At one point in my life I could recite the dive tables from memory.

[www.naui.org image 375x332]

Diving, it aint all pretty fish and naked wimmins

I don't understand that chart.  Am I just stupid?  What does the A-L mean?  What if im an L diving at 130 feet?

/they told me no question was a stupid question i swear




The letters corespond to theoretical models of nitrogen loading. They are used to plan repetitive dives. The letter tells the diver theoretically how much nitrogen is in their body so they know how deep/ long they can go on a second dive without getting into the need for decompression stops.

The reason we don't use Navy tables is they are not able to calculate respetitive dives.
 
2013-06-13 10:33:24 AM  

Marcintosh: jfivealive: Marcintosh: flak attack: Mobius strip of human stupidity: I don't know that I believe this tug was on the sea floor. Sounds more like that was a miss-understanding or embellishment. I imagine it was capsized and still on the surface.

He wouldn't have needed decompression if it was on the surface.

If you're stuck 20' (a reasonable guesstimate)under then you most certainly do need decompression.  Divers have been killed via embolism when attempting a landing in shallow water, a wave passes over and they accidentally hold their breath.
The biggest increase in pressure occurs in the first (+,-) 30' feet or so as the ambient pressure doubles.  I don't fark around with this ever.  At one point in my life I could recite the dive tables from memory.

[www.naui.org image 375x332]

Diving, it aint all pretty fish and naked wimmins

I don't understand that chart.  Am I just stupid?  What does the A-L mean?  What if im an L diving at 130 feet?

/they told me no question was a stupid question i swear

Agreed, that isn't the easiest to unnerstan chart.
Try this on for size. It deals with the PADI chart but they're all similar
http://www.instructables.com/id/Reading-Dive-Tables/step2/Side-1-Tab le -1-Left-Side/


Sweet, thanks for the response.  I get it!
 
2013-06-13 10:53:42 AM  

legion_of_doo: The article is poorly written, but when they said he had to sit in a decompression chamber?

That farking boat wasn't just capsized. It rolled and SANK. Damn.


Or the reporter doesn't know what they are talking about.  You could be deep enough in a capsized boat to need decompression if you stayed there that long but that doesn't mean you would have died if you came up quickly.  At a low depth like that it's a risk of harm, not a certainty of it.

anotar: Found a better article:

http://oilprice.com/Latest-Energy-News/World-News/Ships-Cook-Found-A li ve-in-Sunken-Tug-Boat-off-the-Nigerian-Coast.html

The divers gave Okene a suit, helmet, and mask and after spending more than 60 hours in the cold, dark waters trapped under the ship he finally reached the surface.

Another one told the depth was 100 feet.


Yeah, surfacing without decompression would have been a very bad idea!
 
2013-06-13 10:57:02 AM  

legion_of_doo: Omahawg: now that would suck

Yeah.

The article is poorly written, but when they said he had to sit in a decompression chamber?

That farking boat wasn't just capsized. It rolled and SANK. Damn.

And the only sensations for him in the pitch black were the smells of the dead bodies, the fish moving around, the sound of the fish eating the dead bodies.

That would have sucked.


Plus...

After two days trapped in freezing cold water

Conditions that would have any other human in shock from hypothermia and drowned in just a few minutes.
 
2013-06-13 11:50:20 AM  
I'm dropping a deuce at sea right now, so I'm getting a kick out of this story.
 
2013-06-13 12:48:32 PM  

AngryJailhouseFistfark: booger42: AngryJailhouseFistfark: bmihura: I'm not even scared of swimming in the open sea. Well not until now.

Swimming in the open sea is no big deal. It's taking a crap in a tugboat that'll kill  save you.

FTFY

Oh, save. Right. But it'll be traumatic, just the same.


An unspeakable horror seems closer, but still not enough.

/munch munch
 
2013-06-13 01:24:48 PM  
Loren:

Or the reporter doesn't know what they are talking about.  You could be deep enough in a capsized boat to need decompression if you stayed there that long but that doesn't mean you would have died if you came up quickly.  At a low depth like that it's a risk of harm, not a certainty of it.

He would have died. The depth of the water was irrelevant. The deco obligation would have assuridly been fatal if skipped.
 
2013-06-13 01:58:48 PM  
Okene is not sure he will return to the sea.

No farking shiat.
 
2013-06-13 02:10:07 PM  

Mobius strip of human stupidity: flak attack: Mobius strip of human stupidity: I don't know that I believe this tug was on the sea floor. Sounds more like that was a miss-understanding or embellishment. I imagine it was capsized and still on the surface.

He wouldn't have needed decompression if it was on the surface.

His depth under the water was irrelevant. The entire weight of the vessel was pushing down on the pocket compressing the air. He was breathing gas at a very high pressure and would have required extensive decompression time on the way out. And a recreational dive table was not gonna cut it.


Which orifice did you pull that out of?  It's not a closed system, the weight of the ship would not have determined the amount of pressure even if it was still floating on the surface.  It may have affected how deep the top of the ship was submerged relative to the water's surface, but the pressure could be determined solely by using his depth in the water.   There is no other factor that would have increased or decreased the pressure.
 
2013-06-13 02:14:18 PM  

realityVSperception: Jirafa: I wonder how often something like this happens, and the person doesn't get rescued.

or the russian sub Kursk

There has been much debate over how long the sailors survived. Russian sources say that they would have died very quickly. The Dutch recovery team report a widely believed two- to three-hour survival time in the least affected sternmost compartment In normal operation, water leaks into a stationary Oscar-II craft around the propeller shafts, and at 100 metres (330 ft) depth it would have been impossible to prevent. Others point out that many superoxide chemical cartridges, used to absorb carbon dioxide and provide oxygen in an emergency, were found to have been used when the craft was recovered, suggesting survival for several days. The cartridges seem to have been the final cause of death: a cartridge appears to have come in contact with oily sea water, causing a chemical reaction and flash fire. The official investigation into the disaster showed that some men survived this fire by plunging under water (fire marks on bulkheads indicate the water was at waist level at the time) but the fire would have used up any remaining oxygen in the air, causing death by asphyxiation.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_submarine_Kursk_explosion


One if the few articles I read when I subscribed to Maxim when I was younger. That Russian Sub story made me very uncomfortable to read.
 
2013-06-13 03:24:15 PM  

Rezurok: Mobius strip of human stupidity: flak attack: Mobius strip of human stupidity: I don't know that I believe this tug was on the sea floor. Sounds more like that was a miss-understanding or embellishment. I imagine it was capsized and still on the surface.

He wouldn't have needed decompression if it was on the surface.

His depth under the water was irrelevant. The entire weight of the vessel was pushing down on the pocket compressing the air. He was breathing gas at a very high pressure and would have required extensive decompression time on the way out. And a recreational dive table was not gonna cut it.

Which orifice did you pull that out of?  It's not a closed system, the weight of the ship would not have determined the amount of pressure even if it was still floating on the surface.  It may have affected how deep the top of the ship was submerged relative to the water's surface, but the pressure could be determined solely by using his depth in the water.   There is no other factor that would have increased or decreased the pressure.





I was unclear. The depth of the water he was in was irrelevant. The earlier implication was the air was not compressed if the boat was at the surface. The divers depth gauges would have been accurate and used to determine the guys exposure and deco schedule.
 
2013-06-13 03:39:07 PM  
i2.listal.com
waiting...
 
2013-06-13 03:44:41 PM  
Any word on whether or not he had completed his business prior to the capsize?  It is a nightmare either way but imagine you just finished letting the kids off at the pool and then the pool turns over on you.  Then you have to sit in it for the next few days until rescued.  And you can't just pop up and shower, you have to decompress for awhile.
 
2013-06-13 04:21:16 PM  
25.media.tumblr.com
 
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