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(Mental Floss) Video Using your new Commodore 64 (in 1982)   (mentalfloss.com) divider line 67
    More: Video, Commodore, home computers  
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4998 clicks; posted to Video » on 12 Jun 2013 at 8:56 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-06-12 09:14:22 AM  
$399 is $964 in 2012 dollars.  I remember them being more pricey, but I was 5 in 1982 and poor.
 
2013-06-12 09:17:44 AM  

stuhayes2010: $399 is $964 in 2012 dollars.  I remember them being more pricey, but I was 5 in 1982 and poor.


So was I. My parents did manage to send me to a computer camp in the early '80s with Atari 800s. It was fun. But they could only afford a VIC-20 with Datasette for me. I had fun anyways, and it wasn't too long until I managed to upgrade it to a 64. I did that by finding a surplus 4064 board and putting that in the VIC's case. Instant C64, minus sound chip.
 
2013-06-12 09:33:42 AM  
In 1982 I had already had a computer for 2 years (an 'Orange', an Apple ][ clone), and was still 2 years away from my next computer, a shiny //c with a whopping 128k of memory.
 
2013-06-12 09:33:45 AM  
It's surprising how Ghostbusters (the game) still looks pretty decent.
the karaoke intro is great....
 
2013-06-12 09:40:47 AM  
In 1982, I was 2.  I think at the time my dad had a VIC-20, got a TRS-80 when I was about 3, then at 5 we had our first IBM type Tandy 1000 SX.  Good times.
 
2013-06-12 09:41:17 AM  
I bought mine when the first came out. I remember my cassette storage less than fondly and the 75baud modem seemed like magic. I did on line banking with it the first year, lots of text based games and a few graphic ones.

Upgraded to the portable unit so I could do word processing at work. Then moved to the 128. Those were the days, glad they are gone.

ts2.mm.bing.net
 
2013-06-12 09:42:01 AM  
This can't be from '82.

Ghostbusters came out in '84.
 
2013-06-12 09:45:48 AM  

blackhonda: Upgraded to the portable unit


I have one of those, although I got it second hand. I think it increased in value somewhat, especially since I have the original keyboard cable.
 
2013-06-12 09:47:50 AM  

stuhayes2010: $399 is $964 in 2012 dollars.  I remember them being more pricey, but I was 5 in 1982 and poor.


In 1982 the cost was $595, this ad is from later than 82.  Plus the Floppy Drive cost almost as much as the computer, the tape drive was around $100.00 I think and took 30 mins to load a small program.

www.maximumpc.com
 
2013-06-12 09:51:07 AM  

Tom_Slick: stuhayes2010: $399 is $964 in 2012 dollars.  I remember them being more pricey, but I was 5 in 1982 and poor.

In 1982 the cost was $595, this ad is from later than 82.  Plus the Floppy Drive cost almost as much as the computer, the tape drive was around $100.00 I think and took 30 mins to load a small program.

[www.maximumpc.com image 228x173]


Unless you typed this in :

http://www.atarimagazines.com/compute/issue57/turbotape.html
 
2013-06-12 10:04:44 AM  
I also remember typing in short programs that were published in magazines and being amazed at what they did.
I also remember words appearing letter by letter as the modem downloaded at 75 baud.
 
2013-06-12 10:09:12 AM  
The price dropped very quickly after 1983 as Jack Tramiel went into a "losing money on every unit to kill TI, Atari, Coleco, etc" price war.  By early 1984, TI-99s were down around $100 and C-64s were around $125-150.  Nobody was making any money at it, and TI bailed at that point.

The amazing thing to me is that they were still making C-64s... functional identical C-64s... all the way to their bankruptcy in 1994.  Better part of 12 years later.  Not just making... selling them at a fairly decent rate up to the very end.
 
2013-06-12 10:09:44 AM  

stuhayes2010: $399 is $964 in 2012 dollars.  I remember them being more pricey, but I was 5 in 1982 and poor.


i think it might be australian dollars. not sure what the rate was back then.
 
2013-06-12 10:11:21 AM  

Quantum Apostrophe: stuhayes2010: $399 is $964 in 2012 dollars.  I remember them being more pricey, but I was 5 in 1982 and poor.

So was I. My parents did manage to send me to a computer camp in the early '80s with Atari 800s. It was fun. But they could only afford a VIC-20 with Datasette for me. I had fun anyways, and it wasn't too long until I managed to upgrade it to a 64. I did that by finding a surplus 4064 board and putting that in the VIC's case. Instant C64, minus sound chip.


I seldom get to do this, but you were lucky.  We had a Vic-20, with no datasette.  So, we got to type in programs and then they would go away when the power was shut off.

\\ good times
\ 5K FTW!
 
2013-06-12 10:22:51 AM  
I had a TI99-4a
one of my cousins had C64
and my other cousin eventually got an Adam Colecovision.

It's not really surprising that all of us grew up to be computer people.
 
2013-06-12 10:25:09 AM  
I played the feces out of Choplifter back in the day. So I'm getting a kick...
 
2013-06-12 10:34:27 AM  

blackhonda: I also remember typing in short programs that were published in magazines and being amazed at what they did.
I also remember words appearing letter by letter as the modem downloaded at 75 baud.



Compute magazine. I had the Superexpander for my VIC-20. 16K of RAM, I was somebody.
 
2013-06-12 10:35:59 AM  
It's amazing how ahead of its time the C64 was. 64k is still a huge amount of memory even today.
 
2013-06-12 10:38:39 AM  

escherblacksmith: We had a Vic-20, with no datasette.


Ouch... At my geeky 8-bit peak, my C64 outfit had a 512K RAM expansion (upgraded from 256k for free, ask me how), a proportional mouse, a 1581 3.5" drive, two 1541s, a 1571 and a crappy printer, the 1526 which took half an hour to print a page in graphics mode. This was the '80s, I don't remember how I earned all this money but I was working a lot at the gardening centre and had a paper route.

I remember reading Mr Butterfield's articles on assembler.
 
2013-06-12 10:49:43 AM  

MayoSlather: It's amazing how ahead of its time the C64 was. 64k is still a huge amount of memory even today.


Well, it was in a lot of ways.  16 colors and 3 sound channels was the bomb.  When did EGA finally become standard on PCs?
 
2013-06-12 10:49:58 AM  

spickus: Compute magazine. I had the Superexpander for my VIC-20. 16K of RAM, I was somebody.


I had to build my own from an article in 73 magazine. I remember spending all summer saving money to buy the two stupid 8Kx8 SRAM chips at Future Electronics. Little did I know that I should have just looked at the back of those magazines for mail-order stores but all I had was a photocopy of the article.

MayoSlather: It's amazing how ahead of its time the C64 was. 64k is still a huge amount of memory even today.


Tell me about it. I still do small embedded applications in assembler on tiny microcontrollers. A switch debouncer, some A/D conversions with 16 bit math (wow), some state machine behavior, all in about 300 "bytes" of PIC code. I am tired of that crap though, I gotta try to get the Hitech C compiler working in MPLAB.
 
Bf+
2013-06-12 10:53:14 AM  

Quantum Apostrophe: My parents did manage to send me to a computer camp in the early '80s


Was that in '84?
/Not sure.
 
2013-06-12 10:59:36 AM  

FarkingReading: This can't be from '82.

Ghostbusters came out in '84.


The intro says "more than 7 million sold", which according to this site would place it around 1987.
 
2013-06-12 11:14:30 AM  
I remember my dad having a text based adult choose your own adventure type game.

You could have sex with someone who looked like Marylin Monroe... except the catch she had Atomi Aids and if you did have sex with her you would die and the game would restart.

I also remember that if you put in an age under 18 then when you were going to be able to have sex with main heroine of the game she'd beat you to death with a cemenet filled hair dryer for trying to do anything with her and being that young.

Any idea what game THAT was?
 
2013-06-12 11:25:31 AM  
Ah... Jim Butterfield (1936-2007)... Was a very smart guy...
R.I.P.
 
2013-06-12 11:25:59 AM  

Jim from Saint Paul: I remember my dad having a text based adult choose your own adventure type game.

You could have sex with someone who looked like Marylin Monroe... except the catch she had Atomi Aids and if you did have sex with her you would die and the game would restart.

I also remember that if you put in an age under 18 then when you were going to be able to have sex with main heroine of the game she'd beat you to death with a cemenet filled hair dryer for trying to do anything with her and being that young.

Any idea what game THAT was?


Sounds like Another Sex Adventure.
 
2013-06-12 11:26:18 AM  
I had a TI99-4A, and then got the C64 for Christmas.
Immediately played Zork for 24 hrs straight.

No always online connection needed, no crappy multiplayer, and it was EXCELLENT.
 
2013-06-12 11:29:56 AM  
Jim from Saint Paul: You could have sex with someone who looked like Marylin Monroe... except the catch she had Atomi Aids and if you did have sex with her you would die and the game would restart.

My dad had one where you could have a threesome with Deanna Troi and Tasha Yar, all in text.
 
2013-06-12 11:38:41 AM  
I took my kids to the Smithsonian a couple years ago and felt officially old.  The three computers I learned to program on were displayed right next to each other in one of the display cases: The Radio Shack TRS-80, the Commodore 64, and the Apple IIe.
 
2013-06-12 11:42:43 AM  

Quantum Apostrophe: blackhonda: Upgraded to the portable unit

I have one of those, although I got it second hand. I think it increased in value somewhat, especially since I have the original keyboard cable.


I have 3 C64s 2 128s with several drives, countless accessories and games (most in box). I love them all. (I desperately want a PET and a VIC 20)

I have a DOS box setup who's only current job is to act as a ROM archive and hard drive for my 128.

Don't even get me started on my Amiga stuff...
 
Bf+
2013-06-12 11:51:25 AM  

kregh99: I took my kids to the Smithsonian a couple years ago and felt officially old.  The three computers I learned to program on were displayed right next to each other in one of the display cases: The Radio Shack TRS-80, the Commodore 64, and the Apple IIe.


upload.wikimedia.org
You belong in a museum!


/me too
 
2013-06-12 12:00:52 PM  
we had a Commodore Vic 21 around 82 or 83.  i played the hell out of Gorf for at least 2 years before friends started getting intellivisions and nintendos and later when we got an atari.

/old
 
2013-06-12 12:16:07 PM  
,8,1
 
2013-06-12 12:23:08 PM  
TI-99/4A here. learned BASIC, programmed any number of horse-racing games and single-path CYOA games. Plus redefined the high ASCII set with all sorts of 8x8 sprites. alas, I never graduated to real-time arcade-style programming, but I had fun. I can still remember the dread tension when the tape player stopped its digital whining and it was time to see if the program loaded correctly.
 
2013-06-12 12:24:51 PM  
Yep.. The C64 (and 128C) were awesome. While everyone else was lamenting the "video game crash", I was playing games that were WAY ahead of the home consoles.

Just the Ultima and SSI Gold Box games were reason enough to love the C64, but then stuff from EA (when they were still cool) and Epyx just made gaming wonderful at the time. I was actually late to get an NES because I had so many C64 games, and they were so much more interesting to me than the cheap platformers on the NES. Super Mario Bros? No, I would much rather have spent hours playing Mail Order Monsters or Jumpman Jr., or even the Phantasie games.

And I made music with my C64. It played somewhat nicely with my synthesizers and even worked as a cheap sequencer, as well as making cool sounds itself. Alas, at the time the music I made with the C64 wasn't considered edgy or even called "chiptunes"... It was just thought of as "video game noise."

/We might have accidentally invented dubstep.
//I'm sorry. We were just fooling around.
 
2013-06-12 12:32:39 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: a 1571 and a crappy printer, the 1526 which took half an hour to print a page in graphics mode. This was the '80s,


I hated the 1571. It was often the bane of my computing joy. I'd pop a disk into the thing, and it would not play nice because the disk was a cracked, traded, hacked or otherwise non-original copy. The 1571 was not a friend to game traders... And game trading was rampant in my town.

I also hated the 1526... What a terrible old printer it was.

I was online (Q-Link and what passed for newsgroups, as well as my own BBS) back then, on my C64 (and later 128C, then my IBM 286 PC). In fact, I used my current FARK handle online back then.

I did have other computers... I had a TI-99/4A, a Timex-Sinclair (2k! Woo!), and a Radio Shack/Tandy Color Computer (CoCo... It was awful). Not all at the same time, of course.

I got my first Amiga just as they were going under. I still contend that there's a parallel Earth where Amiga became the dominant computer and operating system, and IBM/Windows died off.
 
2013-06-12 12:43:00 PM  
[peeks head around corner] Commodore sucks! Atari rules! [takes off running]
 
2013-06-12 12:44:56 PM  

ZeroCorpse: I hated the 1571. It was often the bane of my computing joy. I'd pop a disk into the thing, and it would not play nice because the disk was a cracked, traded, hacked or otherwise non-original copy. The 1571 was not a friend to game traders... And game trading was rampant in my town.


It worked OK if you used the Super Snapshot's turbo file system. Stuff just loaded in like 4 seconds.

ZeroCorpse: I also hated the 1526... What a terrible old printer it was.


It wasn't too bad in text mode. I bought it at a close-out sale, it was a step up from the defecatory Comrex CR-220 I had before. That printer was bad, they called it a "dot matrix" printer but it was a single hammer and there was a rotating platen behind the paper, shaped like a star fruit. This made the dots swim all over the place even worse than a regular dot-matrix printer. And LOUD.

Perlin Noise: I have a DOS box setup who's only current job is to act as a ROM archive and hard drive for my 128.


You need this:

www.jschoenfeld.com
 
2013-06-12 01:00:08 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: You need this:


ooo ...ok, oddly, I don't know what that is so let me guess. It looks to be a device that plugs into the cart slot that gives some sort of LAN/Flash Drive capability.

Please, tell me more ;)
 
2013-06-12 01:00:13 PM  
I had a VIC-20 with a 16K expansion, followed by a 128.  In 87 I bought a 286 from Gateway when they were so new that the build slip is hand written. Damn I'm old. I also worked on the last core memory systems made by Digital Equipment Corp.

/get off my lawn
 
2013-06-12 02:40:56 PM  
First computer was a 1st generation CoCo (4K RAM model) back in 1984 in my senior year in HS. My TV I used as a monitor still had tubes!  I got it upgraded to the 16K RAM w/ extended ROM for my birthday about 6 months later.  Never got the floppy drive with OS/9.  Upgraded to a Mac Plus in '98.


oi44.tinypic.com

/ Jr. High we only had a single TRS-80 Model 1 for the entire school.
 
2013-06-12 03:14:46 PM  

natgab: Jr. High we only had a single TRS-80 Model 1 for the entire school.


We had an Apple II lab. I was instantly fascinated by them. Logo and Oregon Trail for the win.

C64 was my first love though. Had to go to a friend's house to crack out on one. After many years past, I managed to convince his parents to give it to me. I treat it like its made of solid gold. And even brought it back to them last year for a visit. No Joke.

Spent HOURS (half of that listening to the disk drive music) on:
Legacy of the Ancients
Pools of Radiance
Mail Order Monster
Summer Games
Jumpman
Impossible Mission ("Destroy him, my robots!")
Test Drive
and countless others
ooo and when nobody was looking, Strip Poker


good times...
 
2013-06-12 03:23:52 PM  

Perlin Noise: Quantum Apostrophe: You need this:

ooo ...ok, oddly, I don't know what that is so let me guess. It looks to be a device that plugs into the cart slot that gives some sort of LAN/Flash Drive capability.

Please, tell me more ;)


It's the Retro Replay cartridge. Something similar lets you do this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IXLv7UosQXs
 
2013-06-12 03:26:08 PM  
encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com
and
encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com
/had a Breakout style game. I think it was called Bricks or something.
 
2013-06-12 03:41:48 PM  

rooftop235: [encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com image 243x208]
and
[encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com image 278x181]
/had a Breakout style game. I think it was called Bricks or something.


Just recently gave a co-worker my Sinclair memory expansion module (in box).

/yes, I search garage sales
//For some reason people in Indiana tend to keep their 80's computer stuff in the box.
///My most recent score was an Odyssey 2 and an NES Action Set both in box with everything included, even warranty card.
 
2013-06-12 03:55:49 PM  

Perlin Noise: natgab: Jr. High we only had a single TRS-80 Model 1 for the entire school.

We had an Apple II lab. I was instantly fascinated by them. Logo and Oregon Trail for the win.

C64 was my first love though. Had to go to a friend's house to crack out on one. After many years past, I managed to convince his parents to give it to me. I treat it like its made of solid gold. And even brought it back to them last year for a visit. No Joke.

Spent HOURS (half of that listening to the disk drive music) on:
Legacy of the Ancients
Pools of Radiance
Mail Order Monster
Summer Games
Jumpman
Impossible Mission ("Destroy him, my robots!")
Test Drive
and countless others
ooo and when nobody was looking, Strip Poker


good times...


--My cousins had a Vic20, so I also got to play around with one.  I did always think it was pretty neat how everything fit into the keyboard.  I loved how back then we had several competing systems and vendors.

Oddly I went from one of the oldest schools in my district to one of the newest.  When I got to High school we had two rooms of computers.  One room was Apple IIs and the other full of terminals hooked up to a larger computer.  This was enough for the High school to be a magnet school and kids could transfer just to take the computer classes. LOL
 
2013-06-12 04:10:22 PM  

natgab: oi44.tinypic.com


Gawd, that's an awful pic of Asimov. He looks like he's the archetypical Angry Old Man Yelling At Kids.
 
2013-06-12 06:32:03 PM  
One nice thing about the VIC-20 and C64 was that they gave you I/O lines that could be read or set by peeking and poking memory locations. Myself and Bill - WW5X used a C64 to build a repeater controller. DTMF decode was an SSI202 chip that was plugged into one of the joystick port.Audio from the receiver was run through the filters.
 
2013-06-12 08:57:31 PM  
Kind of sad that the whole programming aspect of PC's didn't progress to the average user of today.

Now nothing requires thought, just a point/click experience with the browser as the main purpose for most. Even if you use programs on PC's, the internet is a major distraction.
 
2013-06-12 09:34:08 PM  

Tom_Slick: Jim from Saint Paul: I remember my dad having a text based adult choose your own adventure type game.

You could have sex with someone who looked like Marylin Monroe... except the catch she had Atomi Aids and if you did have sex with her you would die and the game would restart.

I also remember that if you put in an age under 18 then when you were going to be able to have sex with main heroine of the game she'd beat you to death with a cemenet filled hair dryer for trying to do anything with her and being that young.

Any idea what game THAT was?

Sounds like Another Sex Adventure.


Yep. lol
 
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