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(Metro)   Meet Misty, the hardest working border collie in the quarry business. Sheep are so yesterday to her since her promotion   ( metro.co.uk) divider line
    More: Sappy, prey  
•       •       •

5538 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 Jun 2013 at 8:57 PM (4 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



31 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-06-11 08:19:56 PM  
metrouk2.files.wordpress.com

Okay, who charged two thousand dollars worth of steak on my card?
 
2013-06-11 09:01:38 PM  
What a biatch- she looks like a total dog...

/kidding
 
2013-06-11 09:03:24 PM  
Their other dog, Starmie, just bites people and shiats on their foot when they try to complain.

/farking bubblebeam
 
2013-06-11 09:05:53 PM  
Border Collie = WAY too smart to be a dog. Not quite smart enuf to be anything else.
 
2013-06-11 09:06:05 PM  

fusillade762: [metrouk2.files.wordpress.com image 650x880]

Okay, who charged two thousand dollars worth of steak on my card?


I'd be surprised if he didn't see $2000 worth of porn and itunes on that card within a week.... Every number and the exp date is visable....
 
2013-06-11 09:09:14 PM  
The cats get one day of the week.  The other six are all Dogurday.

/Dogurday
 
2013-06-11 09:10:20 PM  

fusillade762: [metrouk2.files.wordpress.com image 650x880]

Okay, who charged two thousand dollars worth of steak on my card?


"BARC-LAYS".

heh.
 
2013-06-11 09:14:52 PM  
mine approve

i822.photobucket.com
 
2013-06-11 09:19:56 PM  

CptnSpldng: Border Collie = WAY too smart to be a dog. Not quite smart enuf to be anything else.


I grew up with a border Collie. My parents had goats and she helped bring them in at night. They are scary smart.

I feel bad for border collies that get adopted by owners who want a family dog that is outgoing and bonds with them emotionally. That is NOT what they want to do. They want to work, and if you aren't keeping them busy thy think something is wrong and can even get pretty neurotic. They are beautiful dogs, but some people should be getting labs or retrievers instead.
 
2013-06-11 09:24:30 PM  
Looks like an Australian Shepard to me...
 
2013-06-11 09:38:50 PM  
Fawkes would love this job.  He's half ACD, half Aussie; has a terrific work ethic.  His current tasks include watching me leave for work in the morning; greeting me when I come home; keeping the yard clear of birds, squirrels and bunnies during the day; and telling my husband when it's time to go to bed and when it's time to get up.  He's very strict about that.
 
2013-06-11 09:43:33 PM  
I once knew a hooker named Minnie Mazola!
/murph
 
2013-06-11 09:54:25 PM  
Not news: Dog
 
2013-06-11 09:55:28 PM  
It's more Border then Aussie, keep in mind unlike most breeds Borders (working ones that is) are rarely bred for the show ring colors. A fancy show ring BC with bad temperament is a waste and a piss poor breeder.
 I've have seen damn near every type come though my wife's BC rescue. Best friend I ever had was my Texx, smart as a whip and just as fast but scared to death of damn near everything. Due to a fark that kept him in a 36x48 cage for the first two years of his life, after realizing he could not handle him.

 These are not family dogs these are working dogs!!!!
 fark both AKC and WKC
 
2013-06-11 09:59:48 PM  
Canine labor exploitation needs to be currtailed.
 
2013-06-11 10:25:36 PM  
Can ya feel that heat coming off her genitalia?
 
2013-06-11 10:46:01 PM  
Mine would go and get the card

/but it would have to be attached to a big stick
 
2013-06-11 10:55:10 PM  

Buttle not Tuttle: I feel bad for border collies that get adopted by owners who want a family dog that is outgoing and bonds with them emotionally.


As a child who was constantly herded by his border collie, I disagree. That dog was outgoing, bonded with us emotionally, and made damn sure we didn't get far from home.
 
2013-06-11 11:13:01 PM  

thurstonxhowell: Buttle not Tuttle: I feel bad for border collies that get adopted by owners who want a family dog that is outgoing and bonds with them emotionally.

As a child who was constantly herded by his border collie, I disagree. That dog was outgoing, bonded with us emotionally, and made damn sure we didn't get far from home.


I'm not saying they are incapable of bonding emotionally; ours was deeply emotional. I meant there are people who purchase dogs of a certain breed without learning what it requires to own one. (I'm sure border collies aren't the only breed that suffers from bad owners.) Border collies are very activity oriented and need an outlet for that. It doesn't have to be herding animals or people, but whatever it is, the owner has to make sure his or her dog is getting its daily fix. We were family friends with our breeder, and he tried to to screen potential owners, but some people obviously expected the wrong kind of pet when they went with a border collie. And it's very sad when that happens.
 
2013-06-11 11:24:43 PM  
Buttle not Tuttle:

I'm not saying they are incapable of bonding emotionally; ours was deeply emotional. I meant there are people who purchase dogs of a certain breed without learning what it requires to own one. (I'm sure border collies aren't the only breed that suffers from bad owners.) Border collies are very activity oriented and need an outlet for that. It doesn't have to be herding animals or people, but whatever it is, the owner has to make sure his or her dog is getting its daily fix. We were family friends with our breeder, and he tried to to screen potential owners, but some people obviously expected the wrong kind of pet when they went with a border collie. And it's very sad when that happens.

I own a blue heeler and I know how a working dog can be if it doesn't have a job. It can be something as simple as fetch, but you have to give them "something to do" and work them every day.

I think I agree with what you mean when you say they aren't a "family pet" dog; they are awesome for people who love active dogs though. If you want a frisbee dog you can't go wrong with a herding dog, just keep it busy and it'll stay happy!
 
2013-06-11 11:28:11 PM  

Hipjoint: Due to a fark that kept him in a 36x48 cage for the first two years of his life, after realizing he could not handle him.


That is sad for any dog, much less a very active and intelligent herding breed. Dunno wtf is wrong with people.   You don't even have to work them extremely hard per se, just mentally stimulate them. I had an aussie shepherd mix, and they're of similar intelligence/activity level, and we took her everywhere with us. She would pick up language and all kinds of other stuff just by watching. They just want to feel like they're part of your group or have some kinda purpose.
We taught her to do stuff like put her toys away and pick specific objects out of a pile. They just want to have SOMETHING stimulating to do. And when she got a little stir crazy we let her swim herself out in the river. She would tread water for a couple of hours (voluntarily, we didn't MAKE her go in) wear herself out, and sleep the rest of the day. How damn hard is it to give a dog some exercise and mental stimulation? I mean damn, you can teach them recall and let them run around and play in a field or dog park for a couple hrs or something, and it doesn't even take much effort on your part. You can hide things around and let them out to find them. I can think of all kinds of stuff that doesn't require a shiatload of physical effort on the humans part but will give the dog plenty of activity. But I guess you have to at least be willing to go outdoors then, which seem people seem incapable of.

When the hell did people start thinking of dogs as inactive indoor pets anyway (granted some are, but most are not)? If you want that you should get a cat. Didn't it used to be that dogs were known to be animals that like to go out and run around and actually do things and act like...well...dogs... Now it seems a lot of people get pissed at them for being a stereotypical dog, and I'm not sure why you'd get a dog that you don't want to act like a dog.
 
2013-06-11 11:33:58 PM  

twistofsin: Buttle not Tuttle:

I'm not saying they are incapable of bonding emotionally; ours was deeply emotional. I meant there are people who purchase dogs of a certain breed without learning what it requires to own one. (I'm sure border collies aren't the only breed that suffers from bad owners.) Border collies are very activity oriented and need an outlet for that. It doesn't have to be herding animals or people, but whatever it is, the owner has to make sure his or her dog is getting its daily fix. We were family friends with our breeder, and he tried to to screen potential owners, but some people obviously expected the wrong kind of pet when they went with a border collie. And it's very sad when that happens.

I own a blue heeler and I know how a working dog can be if it doesn't have a job. It can be something as simple as fetch, but you have to give them "something to do" and work them every day.

I think I agree with what you mean when you say they aren't a "family pet" dog; they are awesome for people who love active dogs though. If you want a frisbee dog you can't go wrong with a herding dog, just keep it busy and it'll stay happy!


That's exactly what I meant. Thank you!
 
2013-06-12 12:02:15 AM  

CptnSpldng: Border Collie = WAY too smart to be a dog. Not quite smart enuf to be anything else.


This is Marvin, who belongs to my brother:

img854.imageshack.us

He lives on a 300 acre tobacco farm.  He's now 12 years old, so his cataracts are getting bad, but since there weren't animals to herd during his life here's what Marvin has done, all on his own:

1)  Marvin implemented a cat-stealing program he's never quite stopped when he was only two years old.  If he sees a cat, he picks it up by the scruff and brings it to the barn no matter how hard the cat protests.  Once there, Marvin will not let the cat leave until a human comes to review the situation.  This has been problematic for my brother, because feral cats are happy with a barn that has cat food and other cats living in it, and pet cats are demonstrably unhappy being forced to live in an old barn for even a little bit.  Pet cats also belong to neighbors, who have long since accepted the fact that if they are missing a cat, it's probably in his barn.

2)  He's initiated his own "tractor herding" program, where he tries to get killed every year when the tobacco gets cut down.  If there are no tractors, Marvin is perfectly comfortable herding cars, which also is extremely dangerous for him.

3)  Marvin barks at everything, so when he was three, he got an electroshock bark collar.  Marvin, the smartest dog alive, figured out that the bark collar charges like a camera flash.  He barks until the first spark, then he knows he has 45 seconds until another one, so he barks really, REALLY loudly for 40 seconds and takes a break.  When he sees something barkworthy again, he knows the spark is coming, so he times it.

4)  At some point when he was older (around 9), he decided to organize turtles and fish.  This was somewhat bad news for turtles, and horrendous news for fish.  Whenever he sees one of them, he picks them up and puts them in a pile inside the garage.  My brother figures he's collected at least 60 turtles and as many fish, and he piles them in the same location in the garage.  The fish come from a nearby lake, but they have to be close to shore because Marvin doesn't swim.

5)  "Baby protecting" - Marvin has been present for all three of my nieces births, and until the baby is a year old, Marvin will use his rump to push people away from the baby.  This includes everyone except my sister-in-law.  My brother may as well be a stranger.  He's not nasty about it, but he's very insistent.

Border collies are extremely smart dogs.  I've never seen anything like it from any other animal.
 
2013-06-12 12:23:08 AM  
So it seems like there are quite a few people here who know the breed.  I want to get one in the future, probably around 5 years.  How much do you guys budget per month for a dog?  Additionally, I've heard much of hip dysplasia; is this condition a major concern for this breed?
 
2013-06-12 12:47:20 AM  
I had a border collie when I was a lad. She in turn had whelps I grew up with. I have fond memories of running with her through the woods of eastern Kentucky herding cattle.  Through the rough terrain of an old recovering strip mine, where no horse could run with speed. Boy and dog in our natural element flying through the trees.

Some trespassing redneck hunter shot the poor biatch one day and that was the end of that. It's too bad it wasn't a math test she probably would have won that match, but she wasn't too handy with a shotgun.
 
2013-06-12 01:10:38 AM  

Sandwyrm: So it seems like there are quite a few people here who know the breed.  I want to get one in the future, probably around 5 years.  How much do you guys budget per month for a dog?  Additionally, I've heard much of hip dysplasia; is this condition a major concern for this breed?


Don't let the hip problems get you down about certain breeds, the love you will get/give equals out.

/has gone through a few dogs and their bills
//currently a burnner and a rescue husky.. it's all good
 
2013-06-12 01:23:52 AM  

Sandwyrm: So it seems like there are quite a few people here who know the breed.  I want to get one in the future, probably around 5 years.  How much do you guys budget per month for a dog?  Additionally, I've heard much of hip dysplasia; is this condition a major concern for this breed?


Well, start with the initial cost, different states can be different amounts, if you want a puppy (and especially a female, she will cost more) then there is puppy shots, and yearly boosters...find a vet BEFORE you get the dog! For a nominal amount, pet insurance is the way to go...some surgeries can be quite costly...another thing nobody has mentioned is obedience training. A well trained dog is a joy to have and is generally welcome almost every where. Those are all up front costs tho, monthly bill is just going to be the food, and a decent brand should be $50-$75, give or take. Also, pleaespleaseplease...get him/her spayed or neutered. Pyometra is a terrible thing, and can cost in the thousands for what should be a minor and inexpensive surgery...same for testicular cancer. Just my two cents... (work for a vet and just got off work, the terrible things I see make me wonder what ppl are thinking when the get a dog :-( )
 
2013-06-12 01:32:00 AM  

Lsherm: CptnSpldng: Border Collie = WAY too smart to be a dog. Not quite smart enuf to be anything else.

This is Marvin, who belongs to my brother:

[img854.imageshack.us image 500x889]

He lives on a 300 acre tobacco farm.  He's now 12 years old, so his cataracts are getting bad, but since there weren't animals to herd during his life here's what Marvin has done, all on his own:

1)  Marvin implemented a cat-stealing program he's never quite stopped when he was only two years old.  If he sees a cat, he picks it up by the scruff and brings it to the barn no matter how hard the cat protests.  Once there, Marvin will not let the cat leave until a human comes to review the situation.  This has been problematic for my brother, because feral cats are happy with a barn that has cat food and other cats living in it, and pet cats are demonstrably unhappy being forced to live in an old barn for even a little bit.  Pet cats also belong to neighbors, who have long since accepted the fact that if they are missing a cat, it's probably in his barn.

2)  He's initiated his own "tractor herding" program, where he tries to get killed every year when the tobacco gets cut down.  If there are no tractors, Marvin is perfectly comfortable herding cars, which also is extremely dangerous for him.

3)  Marvin barks at everything, so when he was three, he got an electroshock bark collar.  Marvin, the smartest dog alive, figured out that the bark collar charges like a camera flash.  He barks until the first spark, then he knows he has 45 seconds until another one, so he barks really, REALLY loudly for 40 seconds and takes a break.  When he sees something barkworthy again, he knows the spark is coming, so he times it.

4)  At some point when he was older (around 9), he decided to organize turtles and fish.  This was somewhat bad news for turtles, and horrendous news for fish.  Whenever he sees one of them, he picks them up and puts them in a pile inside the garage.  My brother figures he's collected ...


I love border collies. I'm not a dog person per se, I won't keep them myself because frankly I'm not the kind of person who needs a dog around. As with children, I love them, I like spoiling them, but I don't want any of my own at this point. If I ever settle down a dog and a kid are about the same on my priority list.

[csb] I was there when my favorite dog ever died, a big bull mastiff my friend's dad owned for hunting. After my friend left for college his dad called me up and asked if I could come out and take care of some coyote that were killing his chicken and cats since he'd broken his leg the month before and couldn't stop them from the porch. I went out, borrowed an AR-15 and a couple magazines and the dog just followed me out without prompting because it was that kind of awesome. I'd dropped and skinned about a half dozen of them when I farked up a shot and hit one through the back leg because I got over-eager to fire like an idiot and I was getting a bit kill-sick and sloppy since I normally don't just kill things I'm not going to eat. I yelled at the dog to go grab it while I was lining up on the other one of the pair, but the dog only made it about twenty feet and collapsed. I dropped my rifle mid trigger-pull and ran to see what was wrong, and the poor guy kept trying to get up and go after the coyote screaming in the bushes until I finally told him "it's over buddy, you're a good dog" and walked off to finish the coyote with a pistol since it hadn't made it very far. I walked back and held that poor dog's head in my lap and petted him until he died. Not really something I'm unfamiliar with(frankly, it's how most of my own pets have passed), but I tend not to get too broken up about animals dying and I was crying like a five year old girl with a skinned knee by the time he died.

Dragging a dog that was bigger than me back for a mile and a half through rough terrain was a bastard, but I did and I asked my friend's dad what to do with the corpse. He wasn't exactly feeling like I was(which is to say, still like a weepy little girl, I loved that dog like a brother) about the whole mess, as far as he was concerned it was an old dog and old dogs sometimes die, he told me to either bury it or throw the corpse in the trash pile so I dragged him out by the chicken coop(which was why we were killing coyote that day), wrapped him in all but one of the hides we'd taken that day and buried him. The one hide I kept(his first kill that day, I was off by a half inch and he chased it down broke it's neck without prompting because he was a farking amazing animal) is now tanned and in a lockbox with everything actually valuable I own(and the only sentimental token in that box, I use another one for pictures of ex's and dead friends and stuff I've gotten from them) wrapped around one of his canine teeth I took and kept before burying him, and frankly I'd be more tempted to kill you if you took that than if you managed to get the rough emerald and ruby or silver and gold ingots I also keep in the box. I have yet to let anyone else touch it, or even look at it, the only other person who'll ever see it will be the woman I want to spend my life with, and I doubt I'll let anyone else touch that hide or tooth unless I have kids and want to impress on them just how amazing animals can be. I miss that dog a lot more than I miss anyone else who's died, he saved my life a couple of times from boar and bear, was a better hunting companion than my friend ever was, and was just the most amazing being I've ever had the good fortune to meet, including humans.[/csb]

/I'm gonna go have a scotch, lock my door, and dig that hide and tooth out.
//and probably cry a bit.
///I really miss that dog.
//and "going to have a scotch" is a misnomer, I drank about a quarter of the bottle just to actually get that written down.
 
2013-06-12 06:37:19 AM  

Lsherm: CptnSpldng: Border Collie = WAY too smart to be a dog. Not quite smart enuf to be anything else.

This is Marvin, who belongs to my brother:

He lives on a 300 acre tobacco farm.  He's now 12 years old, so his cataracts are getting bad, but since there weren't animals to herd during his life here's what Marvin has done, all on his own:

1)  Marvin implemented a cat-stealing program he's never quite stopped when he was only two years old.  If he sees a cat, he picks it up by the scruff and brings it to the barn no matter how hard the cat protests.  Once there, Marvin will not let the cat leave until a human comes to review the situation.  This has been problematic for my brother, because feral cats are happy with a barn that has cat food and other cats living in it, and pet cats are demonstrably unhappy being forced to live in an old barn for even a little bit.  Pet cats also belong to neighbors, who have long since accepted the fact that if they are missing a cat, it's probably in his barn.

2)  He's initiated his own "tractor herding" program, where he tries to get killed every year when the tobacco gets cut down.  If there are no tractors, Marvin is perfectly comfortable herding cars, which also is extremely dangerous for him.

3)  Marvin barks at everything, so when he was three, he got an electroshock bark collar.  Marvin, the smartest dog alive, figured out that the bark collar charges like a camera flash.  He barks until the first spark, then he knows he has 45 seconds until another one, so he barks really, REALLY loudly for 40 seconds and takes a break.  When he sees something barkworthy again, he knows the spark is coming, so he times it.

4)  At some point when he was older (around 9), he decided to organize turtles and fish.  This was somewhat bad news for turtles, and horrendous news for fish.  Whenever he sees one of them, he picks them up and puts them in a pile inside the garage.  My brother figures he's collected at least 60 turtles and as many fish, and he piles them in the same location in the garage.  The fish come from a nearby lake, but they have to be close to shore because Marvin doesn't swim.

5)  "Baby protecting" - Marvin has been present for all three of my nieces births, and until the baby is a year old, Marvin will use his rump to push people away from the baby.  This includes everyone except my sister-in-law.  My brother may as well be a stranger.  He's not nasty about it, but he's very insistent.

Border collies are extremely smart dogs.  I've never seen anything like it from any other animal.


Thanks for sharing. Marvin sounds awesome.
 
2013-06-12 08:47:47 AM  
Pawww, c'mon. A Barklies Bank card?

Too bad for Misty's mom that she didn't cover any of the card numbers with those soft-as-velvet poochie lips.
 
2013-06-12 09:28:46 AM  
"Misty can't actually process the orders as she doesn't read or write."

/how stupid do they think we are?
 
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