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(AL.com)   Apparently, two Alabama counties decided to take the NSA's domestic spy programs a couple of steps further toward their logical conclusion   (blog.al.com) divider line 23
    More: Scary, DNA, Bibb, computer surveillance, Kapri Bibbs, NSA, Alabama, St. Clair County, Alabama counties  
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15565 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 Jun 2013 at 6:22 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-06-11 06:56:18 PM  
3 votes:

Pichu0102: So basically, a research org is paying random people on the road to measure various levels of things in their blood to compile statistics and do research. Cue outrage.


The outrage is at the involvement of law enforcement with the inherent coercive effect.
2013-06-11 07:55:20 PM  
2 votes:
"Sure, you can drive away, have a nice evening."
"Hey Lou, get that license plate. We'll get the DNA later."
2013-06-11 07:06:04 PM  
2 votes:
AndreMA: Once you involve a cop, nothing is truly voluntary.

assets.sbnation.com
2013-06-11 06:53:59 PM  
2 votes:
The alleged story is fishy. If it was as stated, it would be easier and cheaper (the deputy had to be paid) to set up in a rest stop and erect a sign or two down the road a way soliciting volunteers.

Once you involve a cop, nothing is truly voluntary.
2013-06-11 06:34:36 PM  
2 votes:
CSB:

About 10 years ago, I was on a treatment for Hep C (Interferon injections combined with Ribavirin pills) that made me anemic to the point that I fainted while driving one night and veered off the road and flipped my car.  When the police showed up, they made me do the FST, after which the cop said, "Now, I'm not going to arrest you for driving while intoxicated, but I'd like you to blow in this thing here".  I laughed, looked at my mom and friend who showed up to make sure I was OK and said, "HA! You hear this guy?!" and he turned to them and said, "I'm not going to arrest her for driving while intoxicated".

I still didn't blow in his thingy.

/CSB

This whole story reeks of something foul.  Or maybe I've just been watching "Fringe" on repeat too much lately.
2013-06-11 06:33:45 PM  
2 votes:
I like how they used police for this completely voluntary study, what a joke.  I've said it a million times:  police should not ever be able to moonlight  as a police officer.  It's a serious conflict of interest.

basemetal: So, what was the "survey" studying?


My guess would be how much alcohol and drugs people have in their system so they can lobby for some new super expensive device.
2013-06-11 05:26:45 PM  
2 votes:
So, what was the "survey" studying?
2013-06-11 11:46:39 PM  
1 votes:

PainfulItching: I used to live near this town. Had to pass through it to get home every night, working in Birmingham. Thank all things holy I never have to go near that area again.

PS The correct answer is, "I'd like to see my lawyer first please."


No, the correct answer is: No.

Like I said above, this has nothing to do with fear of cops (because it wasn't even a regular DUI checkpoint) and it was not an overt exercise of government power (because all they did was have a barrier in the road and people saying "Hi, we're doing a study and want to take your DNA; you get $50 if you agree and you can leave if you want.")

It was the mindset. People will agree to practically anything because THAT'S WHAT PEOPLE DO. It doesn't take much. A couple cops, a few guys with an aura of professorial authority, a little monetary lube for the reluctant--and tra-la! people will fall all over themselves to obey. Now in re people saying "Oh, but they had cops!" (like digitalrain, no offense) well, duh. You need police permission to stop cars on the road. But they would have gotten almost the same cooperation if they'd done the same thing at a similar semi-official location, like a hospital or a school. "Hi, we're with the CDC, and we're tracking vaccines..."

People follow authority. THAT should be the scary takeaway here, not that the cops were involved or the government was sampling DNA or that they had some bogus DUI rationale. It was that so many people put aside their unease and opened their mouths. Because a guy with a badge and another guy in a lab coat said "We need you to do this."
2013-06-11 10:44:18 PM  
1 votes:

Pichu0102: So basically, a research org is paying random people on the road to measure various levels of things in their blood to compile statistics and do research. Cue outrage.


Are you being intentionally obtuse or do you really not see a problem with what they did?

Police officers, who by their very position many people are inclined to obey without question, were
stopping drivers to ask them if they would volunteer their DNA for this study.

The DNA gathered was anonymous...taken from drivers. In cars. With license plates. Around cops.
Who have the ability to look up license plates to see who owns the car.

The purpose behind the study may well have been innocuous, but it doesn't excuse the fact that
they deliberately enlisted police officers - no doubt because they knew people would be more apt
to go along with a request from an officer than some egghead in a lab coat.

/ No offense to eggheads or lab coats
2013-06-11 10:07:25 PM  
1 votes:
You shouldn't be able to force people to stop driving & then ask them if they want to participate in this sort of thing - maybe just have a sign inviting people to 'pull over and get paid for participating in our study' but stopping people by using roadblocks are excessive.

I object to the roadblock - there is nothing voluntary about being stopped while you're going about your lawful business - I mean can Girl Guides make a roadblock and ask the motorists if they want to buy their cookies? - I dare say if they paid the same officials then they could.

And what's the go with the off-duty police doing this ... the article says "Deputies would stop drivers" (not "off-duty deputies would stop drivers" - were they dressed as cops or in non-cop uniforms that would be easily  mistaken for police uniforms?
2013-06-11 09:17:00 PM  
1 votes:
I'll give 'em a stool sample.
2013-06-11 08:26:28 PM  
1 votes:

HAMMERTOE: Hyperbole?


I think we have, in the last 12 years, moved from comic books to science fiction to hyperbole to "the way sh*t is now".  That is the standard formula for installing a fascist state, isn't  it?  Crete causal event, react swiftly for "security", eradicate autonomy for the populace?  I mean, this is reviewed as being pat formula in PoliSci 202, non?
2013-06-11 08:16:47 PM  
1 votes:

jmr61: So basically it was voluntary and nothing at all like what the NSA is doing.

Nice job dumbmitter.


Only a matter of time.

Only. A. Matter. Of. Time.

Obama: "Nobody is listening to your phone calls!"... "but we are reading your emails."

Riiiiiiight.

So, here we are, trading our privacy and autonomy for the illusion of security. Not on a temporary basis. Nor even limited to a wholesale basis. Watch carefully folks. You are seeing the setting of precedent for violations of the Fourth Amendment on an unprecedented scale. "We can catch more terrorists by  having access to your every communication," is merely the beginning. Next stop: breathalyzing every driver, for every trip. No problem? Wait until the damn thing malfunctions and something crucial hangs in the balance.

But wait!!! There's more!

Since you so willingly allowed us to intrude in your communications (and thereby set precedent for governmental intrusion in places where you have a "reasonable expectation of privacy,") as a bonus gift, you get this handy set of cameras for every room in your home! If we can catch more terrorists by monitoring all communications, just think of all the other criminals we can catch by examining all the other areas where people used to feel secure!

Hyperbole?
2013-06-11 07:19:04 PM  
1 votes:
And thanks to SCOTUS, this will probably soon become de rigueuracross the land, without the "voluntary" bits.
2013-06-11 06:50:29 PM  
1 votes:
Vere are your papers?
2013-06-11 06:49:57 PM  
1 votes:

IRQ12: Research has indicated that sobriety checkpoints are effective in reducing drinking and driving and alcohol-related fatal crashes. "


And keeps a lot of people with pretendy assed, LEO sponsored research jobs living in 4 B/R split levels with granite counter tops.
2013-06-11 06:43:09 PM  
1 votes:

IRQ12: I like how they used police for this completely voluntary study, what a joke.  I've said it a million times:  police should not ever be able to moonlight  as a police officer.  It's a serious conflict of interest.


An officer wearing his uniform while off duty and under pay by another entity is called "impersonating a police officer".

/Or abuse of power.
//He may be a police officer at his day job, but using the uniform off-duty in a security guard type position to intimidate people is a crime.
2013-06-11 06:42:36 PM  
1 votes:
images.sodahead.com

Oh,  hell no
2013-06-11 06:40:58 PM  
1 votes:
You can use cops and roadblocks for voluntary studies now?
2013-06-11 06:35:05 PM  
1 votes:

Pichu0102: So basically, a research org is paying random people on the road to measure various levels of things in their blood to compile statistics and do research. Cue outrage.


Yeah, by BLOCKING the road so you can't opt out of being involved in a checkpoint, for SCIENCE.
2013-06-11 06:35:05 PM  
1 votes:
So basically it was voluntary and nothing at all like what the NSA is doing.

Nice job dumbmitter.
2013-06-11 06:32:47 PM  
1 votes:
What a great way to get yourself on the Main Core list.

/Damned if you do, damned if you don't?
2013-06-11 05:27:43 PM  
1 votes:

basemetal: So, what was the "survey" studying?


the DNA of easily lied to people?
 
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