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(AL.com)   Apparently, two Alabama counties decided to take the NSA's domestic spy programs a couple of steps further toward their logical conclusion   (blog.al.com) divider line 76
    More: Scary, DNA, Bibb, computer surveillance, Kapri Bibbs, NSA, Alabama, St. Clair County, Alabama counties  
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15550 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 Jun 2013 at 6:22 PM (44 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-06-11 08:39:37 PM
Just what you'd expect from a small government red state.
 
2013-06-11 08:41:05 PM

dennysgod: Just what you'd expect from a small government red state.


Yeah, that must be it.  Shenanigans never occur in civilized areas with Red Box DVD rentals and Starbucks with wi fi.
 
2013-06-11 09:05:32 PM
You want my DNA? Fine.
Find a cute cop chick and I'll leave DNA all over her face. If ya know what I mean.
 
2013-06-11 09:14:21 PM

Pichu0102: So basically, a research org is paying random people on the road to measure various levels of things in their blood to compile statistics and do research. Cue outrage.


Who do I talk to to get men with guns, badges and the ability to ruin lives with a simple lie to block off a road and "request" the cooperation of people they stop with a study I just came up with?
 
2013-06-11 09:17:00 PM
I'll give 'em a stool sample.
 
2013-06-11 09:32:48 PM

generallyso: Who do I talk to to get men with guns, badges and the ability to ruin lives with a simple lie to block off a road and "request" the cooperation of people they stop with a study I just came up with?


raisingahitter.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-06-11 09:48:26 PM
Today some of my paranoid fantasies came true.
 
2013-06-11 10:02:15 PM
Scary tag? Really? Some of the headlines and tags on this site are moronic.
 
2013-06-11 10:07:25 PM
You shouldn't be able to force people to stop driving & then ask them if they want to participate in this sort of thing - maybe just have a sign inviting people to 'pull over and get paid for participating in our study' but stopping people by using roadblocks are excessive.

I object to the roadblock - there is nothing voluntary about being stopped while you're going about your lawful business - I mean can Girl Guides make a roadblock and ask the motorists if they want to buy their cookies? - I dare say if they paid the same officials then they could.

And what's the go with the off-duty police doing this ... the article says "Deputies would stop drivers" (not "off-duty deputies would stop drivers" - were they dressed as cops or in non-cop uniforms that would be easily  mistaken for police uniforms?
 
2013-06-11 10:23:12 PM
FTA:  "They were here in 2007," said Turrentine, the supervisor in charge of the roadblocks, which took place in several locations in St. Clair County Friday night, early Saturday morning and Saturday night and early Sunday morning. "It's just with social media and Facebook now, word of it has just exploded."

Translation: "Thanks to that gol durn social media, we couldn't get away with hiding it this time..."
 
2013-06-11 10:30:53 PM
"Sheriff's office".

"Yeah, I'm doing sciencey stuff and I need you to lend me some off duty cops in full combat mode and flashy lights on cop cars to set up a Checkpoint Charlie clusterf*ck to ask people nice if they want their DNA profiled for 10.00."

"..."

"Hey, this if for science."

That must have been it.

I mean, it wasn't like you'd need some sort of federal nudge and wink to even think about authorizing OT for this sh*t.

Nah.

They was just trying to further dat scienceing.
 
2013-06-11 10:44:18 PM

Pichu0102: So basically, a research org is paying random people on the road to measure various levels of things in their blood to compile statistics and do research. Cue outrage.


Are you being intentionally obtuse or do you really not see a problem with what they did?

Police officers, who by their very position many people are inclined to obey without question, were
stopping drivers to ask them if they would volunteer their DNA for this study.

The DNA gathered was anonymous...taken from drivers. In cars. With license plates. Around cops.
Who have the ability to look up license plates to see who owns the car.

The purpose behind the study may well have been innocuous, but it doesn't excuse the fact that
they deliberately enlisted police officers - no doubt because they knew people would be more apt
to go along with a request from an officer than some egghead in a lab coat.

/ No offense to eggheads or lab coats
 
2013-06-11 10:46:44 PM

digitalrain: No offense to eggheads or lab coats


The eggheads who signed off on this dime store Gestapo softball match can suck a wet  fart out of my ass.
 
2013-06-11 11:14:28 PM
BREAKING NEWS: Stupid people will do stupid things for money.

/ Nothing new under the Sun.
 
2013-06-11 11:29:09 PM

sheep snorter: An officer wearing his uniform while off duty and under pay by another entity is called "impersonating a police officer".

/Or abuse of power.
//He may be a police officer at his day job, but using the uniform off-duty in a security guard type position to intimidate people is a crime.


Try living where I do.

Cops work traffic control for churches (they set up cones and everything, then block the road while the church folks all drive out, so they don't have to wait for gaps in traffic to leave).

They also basically run security for private businesses. There's a supermarket near me where *every* time I go there, there's a cop either inside the supermarket near the doors, or standing directly outside the doors chastizing anybody who stops for 20 seconds to let somebody out by the door. Nearby is a gas station that also always has a cop car outside it; the cop hangs out there all day, and parks his car there overnight as well.

Hell, there are even a couple of local movie theaters where a cop is always inside the movie theater lobby, and I've actually had a cop tear my ticket stub for me because they're subbing for the theater employee who's gone on break.

Yes, really.

Your tax dollars, hard at work performing minimum-wage jobs at a movie theater.

Got to love it.
 
2013-06-11 11:36:26 PM
I used to live near this town. Had to pass through it to get home every night, working in Birmingham. Thank all things holy I never have to go near that area again.

PS The correct answer is, "I'd like to see my lawyer first please."
 
2013-06-11 11:46:39 PM

PainfulItching: I used to live near this town. Had to pass through it to get home every night, working in Birmingham. Thank all things holy I never have to go near that area again.

PS The correct answer is, "I'd like to see my lawyer first please."


No, the correct answer is: No.

Like I said above, this has nothing to do with fear of cops (because it wasn't even a regular DUI checkpoint) and it was not an overt exercise of government power (because all they did was have a barrier in the road and people saying "Hi, we're doing a study and want to take your DNA; you get $50 if you agree and you can leave if you want.")

It was the mindset. People will agree to practically anything because THAT'S WHAT PEOPLE DO. It doesn't take much. A couple cops, a few guys with an aura of professorial authority, a little monetary lube for the reluctant--and tra-la! people will fall all over themselves to obey. Now in re people saying "Oh, but they had cops!" (like digitalrain, no offense) well, duh. You need police permission to stop cars on the road. But they would have gotten almost the same cooperation if they'd done the same thing at a similar semi-official location, like a hospital or a school. "Hi, we're with the CDC, and we're tracking vaccines..."

People follow authority. THAT should be the scary takeaway here, not that the cops were involved or the government was sampling DNA or that they had some bogus DUI rationale. It was that so many people put aside their unease and opened their mouths. Because a guy with a badge and another guy in a lab coat said "We need you to do this."
 
2013-06-12 12:02:02 AM

Gyrfalcon: PainfulItching: I used to live near this town. Had to pass through it to get home every night, working in Birmingham. Thank all things holy I never have to go near that area again.

PS The correct answer is, "I'd like to see my lawyer first please."

No, the correct answer is: No.

Like I said above, this has nothing to do with fear of cops (because it wasn't even a regular DUI checkpoint) and it was not an overt exercise of government power (because all they did was have a barrier in the road and people saying "Hi, we're doing a study and want to take your DNA; you get $50 if you agree and you can leave if you want.")

It was the mindset. People will agree to practically anything because THAT'S WHAT PEOPLE DO. It doesn't take much. A couple cops, a few guys with an aura of professorial authority, a little monetary lube for the reluctant--and tra-la! people will fall all over themselves to obey. Now in re people saying "Oh, but they had cops!" (like digitalrain, no offense) well, duh. You need police permission to stop cars on the road. But they would have gotten almost the same cooperation if they'd done the same thing at a similar semi-official location, like a hospital or a school. "Hi, we're with the CDC, and we're tracking vaccines..."

People follow authority. THAT should be the scary takeaway here, not that the cops were involved or the government was sampling DNA or that they had some bogus DUI rationale. It was that so many people put aside their unease and opened their mouths. Because a guy with a badge and another guy in a lab coat said "We need you to do this."


No matter what the situation is with a cop, the answer is always, "lawyer, please." I appreciate your thoughts on this, but anything you say to a cop will be used against you, Miranda rights or not.
Got busted for speeding. Just wasn't paying attention, and he got me on a clear 4 lane highway. AL trooper walked to the door, I had license, proof of insurance, and registration in hand. I simply told him I wasn't paying attention to my speed. That quote, "I wasn't paying attention to my speed" was on the printed $235 ticket. Of course I paid it. He had a dashcam and a microphone, plus what I opened my big mouth to. I should have said nothing except identify myself if he asked me, and said "I don't know" to everything else. I could have brought it to court that his GPS readings were off, and the ticket said he pulled me over 4 miles down a side road, but cameras. Paid it online and moved on with my life.
 
2013-06-12 12:37:13 AM

Gyrfalcon: It was the mindset. People will agree to practically anything because THAT'S WHAT PEOPLE DO. It doesn't take much. A couple cops, a few guys with an aura of professorial authority, a little monetary lube for the reluctant--and tra-la! people will fall all over themselves to obey. Now in re people saying "Oh, but they had cops!" (like digitalrain, no offense) well, duh. You need police permission to stop cars on the road. But they would have gotten almost the same cooperation if they'd done the same thing at a similar semi-official location, like a hospital or a school. "Hi, we're with the CDC, and we're tracking vaccines..."


No offense taken, Gyr. I didn't say that I would blindly fall in line. I've met too many a-hole cops
with agendas for that. BUT there's no getting around the fact that many folks will automagically
do whatever a cop asks them to do.
 
2013-06-12 12:48:30 AM
Voluntary, like those house searches in Boston?

/I may have tried to let my dog lick the swab and turned it in.  $10 for doggy breath!
 
2013-06-12 01:26:46 AM

digitalrain: Gyrfalcon: It was the mindset. People will agree to practically anything because THAT'S WHAT PEOPLE DO. It doesn't take much. A couple cops, a few guys with an aura of professorial authority, a little monetary lube for the reluctant--and tra-la! people will fall all over themselves to obey. Now in re people saying "Oh, but they had cops!" (like digitalrain, no offense) well, duh. You need police permission to stop cars on the road. But they would have gotten almost the same cooperation if they'd done the same thing at a similar semi-official location, like a hospital or a school. "Hi, we're with the CDC, and we're tracking vaccines..."

No offense taken, Gyr. I didn't say that I would blindly fall in line. I've met too many a-hole cops
with agendas for that. BUT there's no getting around the fact that many folks will automagically
do whatever a cop asks them to do.


True, true. My only point here is that too many people here are taking away the wrong point here. They are focusing on the cop factor. I'm focusing on the needlessness factor (hm, needlessness is a word). There was absolutely NO reason for ANYONE to do ANYTHING here--not even ask for a lawyer--and yet people did it anyway, just because. Now, you are correct that they will immediately do what a cop says, which is scary enough--but why would even you say "Lawyer, please."? Why not just "No."?

I just find it fascinating, and very alarming, that, faced with the setup, the two most common responses are 1. obey because its a cop, or 2. disobey because its a cop. Nobody is saying 3. disobey because there's no reason to obey. The option to refuse was clearly given (you don't have to acquiesce, and just not get the money) and yet everyone's response to that is "Aha! They're recording license plates! They're keeping track of who refuses so they can catch them later!" Really? Why? That's your FIRST reaction?

Now I realize some of these responses may be sarcastic (I hope!), but my curiosity is piqued that so few people would just not say "No, thank you," and drive on. And why that is.
 
2013-06-12 05:57:10 AM

Rumplebluntskin: People have the right to travel freely without getting hassled by the police for no good reason.


In Abalama? Baw, lemme tell yew sumpin'.
3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-06-12 06:39:11 AM
This was a horribly conducted study, and there's no way they were going to get a representative sample of people doing something illegal as long as it was both voluntary and conducted by cops, and by necessity required people to hand over identifying information.  That said, you can't actually identify someone with their blood or saliva without already having their DNA on record, and almost nobody has their DNA on record. It's also an important study, if only to tell us the the bare minimum people driving drunk. The outrage is completely manufactured by conspiracy nuts.
 
2013-06-12 11:22:07 AM

sno man: Was going to say that official is either not too bright, or he's hoping everyone giving samples is not too bright.


Well, since the person saying they aren't getting DNA is from Washington, DC, I'd say he's the one that isn't too bright.

BitwiseShift: I remember when Alabama used to give away free Syphilis -- but you had to be black, living in Tuskegee and working in the agricultural trades. They were very good about keeping it a secret, so you can rest assured this research will be handled with the same professionalism.

Could be a retest -- depending on what's on the needles.


Your memory is somewhat flawed.  The United States Government (as in the US Public Health Service) gave away free syphillis, not the state of Alabama.  They simply chose Tuskegee as a distribution point.

dennysgod: Just what you'd expect from a small government red state.


Federal government program, not state program.
 
2013-06-12 11:22:29 AM
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michigan_Dept._of_State_Police_v._Sitz one of the many wrongly decided supreme court cases that is destroying this country

"The Court also held that the impact on drivers, such as in delaying them from reaching their destination, was negligible, and that the brief questioning to gain "reasonable suspicion" similarly had a negligible impact on the drivers' Fourth Amendment right from unreasonable search"

This reasoning is used to justify all kinds of totalitarian bullshiat
 
2013-06-12 12:52:19 PM
I assume the NSA already has most everyone's DNA.  Just like they requisition your records from the phone companies, I assume they also can requisition your blood from the big corporations, where your doctor sends all those blood samples to see if your liver is shot yet or if you have butt cancer.

Anyone who thinks the NSA has totally "come clean" now is really naive.
 
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