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(Vice)   Cops want to legalize pot, in irony round-about   (vice.com) divider line 126
    More: Unlikely, Law Enforcement Against Prohibition, Webster's Dictionary, marijuana legalization, Rotary Club, Gil Kerlikowske, drug czar  
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8892 clicks; posted to Main » on 10 Jun 2013 at 2:13 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-06-10 01:10:33 PM
Retiring from the force in 1989 as a Captain, he founded Law Enforcement Against Prohibition, an organization of 3,500 former officers working towards the legalization of all drugs.

EX-cops subby, EX-cops. You won't find very many current officers spouting that, as it would probably cost them their jobs.

/He is right though, they are a bunch of hypocrites while they had the uniform on
 
2013-06-10 01:28:37 PM
Meh, too much money at stake, from DEA budgets to local police departments.

/and don't forget about the revenue
//those seizures make a bit of money
///and someone think of the lawyers
 
2013-06-10 01:51:58 PM
Much like out of office politicians, I don't consider someone a "hero" for suppressing their beliefs until they can express them without consequences.
 
2013-06-10 01:56:06 PM

basemetal: Meh, too much money at stake, from DEA budgets to local police departments.

/and don't forget about the revenue
//those seizures make a bit of money
///and someone think of the lawyers


Which is pretty much why I support legalization, and I don't smoke the stuff.

Legalization will mean that police can shift focus to other matters, and states can reduce their prison budgets a bit--which would be good news to taxpayers, less so for the prison industry. It won't eliminate the corruption that goes along with seizures, but it will help reduce the number of seizures. That will mean some folks will have to pay full price, or at least market price for condos, boats, cars and the rest, but at this point, I don't think that will hurt the economy so much. It will also help reduce the caseload that our public defenders have to sift through, it will also mean that legal sales can be made, entrepreneurs can look at better hemp products, beyond the hippy crap, and real industrial and agricultural applications.

Reducing court times, prison pressures, and actual industrial applications and entrepreneurs making money and creating jobs, it's a far better thing than trafficking in prison laundry and food service, with far better growth potential. Tasking our police back to real criminals won't hurt either.
 
2013-06-10 02:15:27 PM
It's true, cops want to concentrate on violent criminals so they can break skulls more often.
 
2013-06-10 02:15:51 PM

hubiestubert: basemetal: Meh, too much money at stake, from DEA budgets to local police departments.

/and don't forget about the revenue
//those seizures make a bit of money
///and someone think of the lawyers

Which is pretty much why I support legalization, and I don't smoke the stuff.

Legalization will mean that police can shift focus to other matters, and states can reduce their prison budgets a bit--which would be good news to taxpayers, less so for the prison industry. It won't eliminate the corruption that goes along with seizures, but it will help reduce the number of seizures. That will mean some folks will have to pay full price, or at least market price for condos, boats, cars and the rest, but at this point, I don't think that will hurt the economy so much. It will also help reduce the caseload that our public defenders have to sift through, it will also mean that legal sales can be made, entrepreneurs can look at better hemp products, beyond the hippy crap, and real industrial and agricultural applications.

Reducing court times, prison pressures, and actual industrial applications and entrepreneurs making money and creating jobs, it's a far better thing than trafficking in prison laundry and food service, with far better growth potential. Tasking our police back to real criminals won't hurt either.


When has government ever done anything because it made actual sense?
 
2013-06-10 02:20:58 PM
No sane person wants people in jail or prison for pot. Then again, this country doesn't exactly run on smarts.
 
2013-06-10 02:21:42 PM
It's when cops take about 20k worth of pot, but only report 15k.
 
2013-06-10 02:22:17 PM

Jument: No sane person wants people in jail or prison for pot. Then again, this country doesn't exactly run on smarts.


It runs on electrolytes?.
 
2013-06-10 02:22:31 PM
I don't know what it is, but this author (pauses for dramatic effect) annoys me.
 
2013-06-10 02:23:39 PM
There's no irony.  Cops enforce the law, not make it.
 
2013-06-10 02:23:43 PM
Legal here, guess what. Not much has changed. People that smoke it, still do and people that don't just don't.
 
2013-06-10 02:24:16 PM

scottydoesntknow: Retiring from the force in 1989 as a Captain, he founded Law Enforcement Against Prohibition, an organization of 3,500 former officers working towards the legalization of all drugs.

EX-cops subby, EX-cops. You won't find very many current officers spouting that, as it would probably cost them their jobs.

/He is right though, they are a bunch of hypocrites while they had the uniform on


I don't think that makes them hypocrites, just acting against their conscience.  A hypocrite would be if they themselves smoked pot even while they bust others for pot offenses.
 
2013-06-10 02:24:28 PM

CygnusDarius: It's when cops take about 20k worth of pot, but only report 15k.


I hate when the cops take 15k, and only report about 10k.
 
2013-06-10 02:25:49 PM

mentallo69: CygnusDarius: It's when cops take about 20k worth of pot, but only report 15k.

I hate when the cops take 15k, and only report about 10k.


So what do you think that $5K of pot is really worth?
 
2013-06-10 02:25:55 PM

scottydoesntknow: Retiring from the force in 1989 as a Captain, he founded Law Enforcement Against Prohibition, an organization of 3,500 former officers working towards the legalization of all drugs.

EX-cops subby, EX-cops. You won't find very many current officers spouting that, as it would probably cost them their jobs.

/He is right though, they are a bunch of hypocrites PIGS while they had the uniform on

 
2013-06-10 02:26:54 PM
Seriously, Shirley?
Hypocrisy goes really cheap these days.
Combine with a dash of Christian Taliban and throw in the Divided and Conquered Dupes, wonder of wonders, you have business plan.

keep your lamps trimmed and burning
 
2013-06-10 02:26:58 PM

CygnusDarius: Jument: No sane person wants people in jail or prison for pot. Then again, this country doesn't exactly run on smarts.

It runs on electrolytes?.


It runs on Dunkin.
/or so the commericals tell me.
 
2013-06-10 02:27:01 PM

mentallo69: CygnusDarius: It's when cops take about 20k worth of pot, but only report 15k.

I hate when the cops take 15k, and only report about 10k.


And they tell the news that they got 5k.

megarian: mentallo69: CygnusDarius: It's when cops take about 20k worth of pot, but only report 15k.

I hate when the cops take 15k, and only report about 10k.

So what do you think that $5K of pot is really worth?


I don't know cop-math very well :/.
 
2013-06-10 02:27:09 PM

scottydoesntknow: Retiring from the force in 1989 as a Captain, he founded Law Enforcement Against Prohibition, an organization of 3,500 former officers working towards the legalization of all drugs.

EX-cops subby, EX-cops. You won't find very many current officers spouting that, as it would probably cost them their jobs.

/He is right though, they are a bunch of hypocrites while they had the uniform on


Not true. He took a job to enforce the law. Had nothing to do with his beliefs. Doesn't make them hypocrites. A hypocrite preaches one thing and does the opposite. He was always preaching to legalize drugs yet duty bound to do his job which was enforce the law.
 
2013-06-10 02:27:29 PM

basemetal: Meh, too much money at stake, from DEA budgets to local police departments.

/and don't forget about the revenue
//those seizures make a bit of money
///and someone think of the lawyers


More than that, CEOs of private prison companies absolutely don't want pot legalized.  They want those prisons full.  And they have lobbyists.
 
2013-06-10 02:27:38 PM

Arkanaut: scottydoesntknow: Retiring from the force in 1989 as a Captain, he founded Law Enforcement Against Prohibition, an organization of 3,500 former officers working towards the legalization of all drugs.

EX-cops subby, EX-cops. You won't find very many current officers spouting that, as it would probably cost them their jobs.

/He is right though, they are a bunch of hypocrites while they had the uniform on

I don't think that makes them hypocrites, just acting against their conscience.  A hypocrite would be if they themselves smoked pot even while they bust others for pot offenses.


That's pretty much the definition of a hypocrite.
 
2013-06-10 02:28:10 PM

megarian: mentallo69: CygnusDarius: It's when cops take about 20k worth of pot, but only report 15k.

I hate when the cops take 15k, and only report about 10k.

So what do you think that $5K of pot is really worth?


Well I think 5k worth of pot has a street value of 5k?
 
2013-06-10 02:28:38 PM
Colour me unsurprised; I've worked with cops and never met one that  didn't smoke weed.
 
2013-06-10 02:28:38 PM
Terrydatroll:

Not true. He took a job to enforce the law. Had nothing to do with his beliefs. Doesn't make them hypocrites. A hypocrite preaches one thing and does the opposite. He was always preaching to legalize drugs yet duty bound to do his job which was enforce the law.

Wrong. He's a hypocrite. Almost to the letter.
 
2013-06-10 02:29:07 PM

CygnusDarius: mentallo69: CygnusDarius: It's when cops take about 20k worth of pot, but only report 15k.

I hate when the cops take 15k, and only report about 10k.

And they tell the news that they got 5k.

megarian: mentallo69: CygnusDarius: It's when cops take about 20k worth of pot, but only report 15k.

I hate when the cops take 15k, and only report about 10k.

So what do you think that $5K of pot is really worth?

I don't know cop-math very well :/.


At this point, cop math would = "What pot?"
 
2013-06-10 02:29:42 PM

Terrydatroll: A hypocrite preaches one thing and does the opposite. He was always preaching to legalize drugs yet duty bound to do his job which was enforce the law.


Yes, but a cop can be selective in how they enforce the law (which is why they can give warnings when the law says you deserve a ticket for speeding). If he arrested one person for pot possession (or any drug possession by his statement), then he is a hypocrite.
 
2013-06-10 02:30:38 PM

mentallo69: megarian: mentallo69: CygnusDarius: It's when cops take about 20k worth of pot, but only report 15k.

I hate when the cops take 15k, and only report about 10k.

So what do you think that $5K of pot is really worth?

Well I think 5k worth of pot has a street value of 5k?


That is *almost* never true.
 
2013-06-10 02:31:07 PM

mentallo69: megarian: mentallo69: CygnusDarius: It's when cops take about 20k worth of pot, but only report 15k.

I hate when the cops take 15k, and only report about 10k.

So what do you think that $5K of pot is really worth?

Well I think 5k worth of pot has a street value of 125k?


FTF cop math.
 
2013-06-10 02:31:23 PM

bwilson27: scottydoesntknow: Retiring from the force in 1989 as a Captain, he founded Law Enforcement Against Prohibition, an organization of 3,500 former officers working towards the legalization of all drugs.

EX-cops subby, EX-cops. You won't find very many current officers spouting that, as it would probably cost them their jobs.

/He is right though, they are a bunch of hypocrites PIGS while they had the uniform on



What behavior would you expect from someone who would do the job in the first place?
Taking money(filthy lucre) for inhuman treatment of your fellow man takes a special sociopath in the first place to fall back on "it is The Law" or "just doin' my job".
 
2013-06-10 02:31:24 PM
You know officers, you can use something called "discretion" and not arrest every person you find with a joint. It's just your tiny penis and colossal ego won't allow to do that.
 
2013-06-10 02:32:24 PM
assets.vice.com

Why did they use a picture of Terry Gilliam?
 
2013-06-10 02:32:59 PM
GOOD.

At the very least decriminalize it. If you want to make the country happier, legalize it and tax it.

The Lone Gunman: More than that, CEOs of private prison companies absolutely don't want pot legalized.  They want those prisons full.  And they have lobbyists.


Private Prisons make up less than 9% of the Prisons in the United States. :|

Terrydatroll: Not true. He took a job to enforce the law. Had nothing to do with his beliefs. Doesn't make them hypocrites. A hypocrite preaches one thing and does the opposite. He was always preaching to legalize drugs yet duty bound to do his job which was enforce the law.


This.
 
2013-06-10 02:33:09 PM

snocone: bwilson27: scottydoesntknow: Retiring from the force in 1989 as a Captain, he founded Law Enforcement Against Prohibition, an organization of 3,500 former officers working towards the legalization of all drugs.

EX-cops subby, EX-cops. You won't find very many current officers spouting that, as it would probably cost them their jobs.

/He is right though, they are a bunch of hypocrites PIGS while they had the uniform on


What behavior would you expect from someone who would do the job in the first place?
Taking money(filthy lucre) for inhuman treatment of your fellow man takes a special sociopath in the first place to fall back on "it is The Law" or "just doin' my job".


You. Sir. Are. Correct.
 
2013-06-10 02:34:06 PM

abhorrent1: You know officers, you can use something called "discretion" and not arrest every person you find with a joint. It's just your tiny penis and colossal ego won't allow to do that.


I don't believe that, in most places, drug possession is a discretionary offense like a speeding ticket is.
 
2013-06-10 02:34:47 PM

hubiestubert: basemetal: Meh, too much money at stake, from DEA budgets to local police departments.

/and don't forget about the revenue
//those seizures make a bit of money
///and someone think of the lawyers

Which is pretty much why I support legalization, and I don't smoke the stuff.

Legalization will mean that police can shift focus to other matters, and states can reduce their prison budgets a bit--which would be good news to taxpayers, less so for the prison industry. It won't eliminate the corruption that goes along with seizures, but it will help reduce the number of seizures. That will mean some folks will have to pay full price, or at least market price for condos, boats, cars and the rest, but at this point, I don't think that will hurt the economy so much. It will also help reduce the caseload that our public defenders have to sift through, it will also mean that legal sales can be made, entrepreneurs can look at better hemp products, beyond the hippy crap, and real industrial and agricultural applications.

Reducing court times, prison pressures, and actual industrial applications and entrepreneurs making money and creating jobs, it's a far better thing than trafficking in prison laundry and food service, with far better growth potential. Tasking our police back to real criminals won't hurt either.


I should also add fark the prison industry. If you make a living running an orginization predicated on throwing people in jail for arbitrary reasons ie: pot smoking. Then you are first of all a horrible horrible person. And second of all it is a horrible horrible government that would allow it's citizens to be exploited in such a manner.

No for profit prisons. No private prisons. It is jail not a money making venture. The people involved with those systems should be jailed themselves.
 
2013-06-10 02:36:14 PM

abhorrent1: You know officers, you can use something called "discretion" and not arrest every person you find with a joint. It's just your tiny penis and colossal ego won't allow to do that.


It really is more of a SWAT thing than just the casual joint/solo cop scenario.
You get much more sociopathy for your buck with a group attack squad.
 
2013-06-10 02:36:24 PM
"Just so we're clear," began Peter Christ during our first phone conversation,

web.gk12.net

/close enough
 
2013-06-10 02:38:32 PM

snocone: abhorrent1: You know officers, you can use something called "discretion" and not arrest every person you find with a joint. It's just your tiny penis and colossal ego won't allow to do that.

It really is more of a SWAT thing than just the casual joint/solo cop scenario.
You get much more sociopathy for your buck with a group attack squad.


House Republicans come a close second.
 
2013-06-10 02:38:41 PM

hubiestubert: basemetal: Meh, too much money at stake, from DEA budgets to local police departments.

/and don't forget about the revenue
//those seizures make a bit of money
///and someone think of the lawyers

Which is pretty much why I support legalization, and I don't smoke the stuff.

Legalization will mean that police can shift focus to other matters, and states can reduce their prison budgets a bit--which would be good news to taxpayers, less so for the prison industry. It won't eliminate the corruption that goes along with seizures, but it will help reduce the number of seizures. That will mean some folks will have to pay full price, or at least market price for condos, boats, cars and the rest, but at this point, I don't think that will hurt the economy so much. It will also help reduce the caseload that our public defenders have to sift through, it will also mean that legal sales can be made, entrepreneurs can look at better hemp products, beyond the hippy crap, and real industrial and agricultural applications.

Reducing court times, prison pressures, and actual industrial applications and entrepreneurs making money and creating jobs, it's a far better thing than trafficking in prison laundry and food service, with far better growth potential. Tasking our police back to real criminals won't hurt either.


I do not disagree, but money is why there is so much resistance
 
2013-06-10 02:38:48 PM

basemetal: Meh, too much money at stake, from DEA budgets to local police departments.

/and don't forget about the revenue
//those seizures make a bit of money
///and someone think of the lawyers


how much revenue does the cigarette and booze sin taxes bring in?

Offer towns their own chance to add additional taxes on the products sold in the locales.
 
2013-06-10 02:39:20 PM
Speaking of cops from Town of Tonawanda--never speed there.  Even a couple of mph over the limit, and especially on River Road.  That's probably the most notorious speed trap in western New York, and it's amazing how many people get caught there.  I'm surprised when I don't see someone pulled over there.
 
2013-06-10 02:41:47 PM

loonatic112358: how much revenue does the cigarette and booze sin taxes bring in?

Offer towns their own chance to add additional taxes on the products sold in the locales.


The problem is that taxation and legal sales will require both Federal Government and FDA approval, while decriminalization requires neither.

Decriminalization is far, FAR easier than legal OTC sales.
 
2013-06-10 02:43:54 PM

hardinparamedic: Private Prisons make up less than 9% of the Prisons in the United States. :|


That doesn't mean they don't have significant dollars invested in lobbying.
 
2013-06-10 02:44:13 PM

hardinparamedic: At the very least decriminalize it.


Personally, I think decriminalization (at least how most would define it) is too half-assed to be anything other than a very short-term solution in lieu of an impending, expected outright legalization.
 
2013-06-10 02:46:09 PM

CygnusDarius: Jument: No sane person wants people in jail or prison for pot. Then again, this country doesn't exactly run on smarts.

It runs on electrolytes?.


It's what pot plants crave.
 
2013-06-10 02:46:47 PM

MayoSlather: hardinparamedic: Private Prisons make up less than 9% of the Prisons in the United States. :|

That doesn't mean they don't have significant dollars invested in lobbying.


Wordsmithing "private" are we?
 
2013-06-10 02:47:36 PM

scottydoesntknow: Terrydatroll: A hypocrite preaches one thing and does the opposite. He was always preaching to legalize drugs yet duty bound to do his job which was enforce the law.

Yes, but a cop can be selective in how they enforce the law (which is why they can give warnings when the law says you deserve a ticket for speeding). If he arrested one person for pot possession (or any drug possession by his statement), then he is a hypocrite.


So do you know whether these 3500 cops arrested people for pot-related offenses or gave warnings?

Also, you seem to be assuming that
1) they have discretion and face no consequences for acting on their discretion;
2) their best course of action is to act on their beliefs in all circumstances; and
3) they have always held their current beliefs, and it isn't a product of their experience over the years.

Even if, let's say, they're conscientious cops from the moment they signed up, they're still under pressure from their superiors and from elected officials to produce pot arrests.  If they quit in protest, there will be plenty of people eager to replace them, with the economy the way it is right now.  (Alternatively, the city may just take the budget savings and not hire back up.)  However, if they play by the book and get into the senior ranks of the police force, they might be able to make a difference in the way the department is run.  Would you say the latter is a worse decision, because it would require them to act against their conscience on occasion?
 
2013-06-10 02:47:39 PM

Killer Cars: hardinparamedic: At the very least decriminalize it.

Personally, I think decriminalization (at least how most would define it) is too half-assed to be anything other than a very short-term solution in lieu of an impending, expected outright legalization.


"Incremental Politics"
 
2013-06-10 02:48:16 PM

bhcompy: There's no irony.  Cops enforce the law, not make it.


Which is why the police are constantly lobbying to keep cannabis illegal? The turnip truck, did you just fall off it?
 
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