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(Cracked)   So, how many of you have noticed the symbolism in any of these five movies?   (cracked.com) divider line 123
    More: Interesting, Vietnam War, studio executive, Cillian Murphy, effects of nuclear explosions, Ken Watanabe, X-Men, combat aircraft, Iceman  
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13292 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 10 Jun 2013 at 1:42 PM (45 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-06-10 01:06:31 PM
And what about The Shining?
 
2013-06-10 01:18:06 PM
Well Aliens/Viet Nam is a stretch but they beat you over the head with the X-Men/gay thing.
 
2013-06-10 01:35:34 PM
I'm confused.  Did the aliens represent the gay or the retirement of anti-gay established film making bowlers?
 
2013-06-10 01:42:04 PM

Mugato: Well Aliens/Viet Nam is a stretch but they beat you over the head with the X-Men/gay thing.


Yeah, I figured that out in the 80's when I wasn't even a teenager yet.
 
2013-06-10 01:44:58 PM

Mugato: Well Aliens/Viet Nam is a stretch but they beat you over the head with the X-Men/gay thing.


Yeah, while it can be generalized to refer to any kind of difference, in the movies at least the parallels to homosexuality are really heavy handed.
 
2013-06-10 01:50:00 PM
It's a Cracked article, and thus automatically ignored. Anything interesting?
 
2013-06-10 01:50:08 PM
Think the word you're looking for there is "symbology", subby
 
2013-06-10 01:50:55 PM
That's weird, I always saw Aliens as an homage to Scooby-Doo where in the end the villain under the mask was us as human beings meddling in things we shouldn't.
 
2013-06-10 01:51:03 PM
I knew number 5 because it had the same feel as that type of movie, however most of my friends thought that was a stretch. 4 was so obvious I couldn't miss it. 3, 2 and 1, I'll just have to take their word for it.
 
2013-06-10 01:52:47 PM
They were Nazis?
 
2013-06-10 01:53:28 PM

Krymson Tyde: And what about The Shining?


It's a how-to guide on butchering an authors work on the big screen.
 
2013-06-10 01:56:17 PM
The Dark Crystal was all about bringing sexy back
 
2013-06-10 01:58:51 PM
 fta:  The Big Lebowski is the Citizen Kane of movies, and a good lot of you can probably recite the entire screenplay from memory.

That's interesting.  I had always thought that Citizen Kane was the Citizen Kane of movies.
 
2013-06-10 01:59:37 PM
1. Obvious
2. Even more obvious
3.  Didn't see it
4.  ok, didn't get that but ok
5.  sort of got it, but the article makes it seem more ham-handed than it was.
 
2013-06-10 02:01:03 PM
i284.photobucket.com
 
2013-06-10 02:01:08 PM
No Country for Old Men may or may not be about "retirement" - but I don't think so. It's about how mankind tells himself stories about how he can control the world and behavior through laws and rules when in fact the world doesn't care at all for our rules and restrictions, and whatever's going to happen is going to happen - but we keep trying anyway, futilely.

Beautiful film. One of my favorites.

Haven't read the book yet though, so, I can't speak to it's meaning.
 
2013-06-10 02:04:16 PM
The whole X-men anti-mutant thing was originally more focused on race than sexuality. The comic kicked off in the early 60's and focused on prejudice and racism quite often. It just so happens that homosexual rights are the current mainstream civil rights movement.
 
2013-06-10 02:04:56 PM
That's a cool look at inception. The rest were no duhs or okay whatever.
 
2013-06-10 02:06:32 PM
Soylent Green was actually about apartheid mixed in with a message about Ceausescu.
 
2013-06-10 02:06:36 PM

Lord Dimwit: Haven't read the book yet though, so, I can't speak to it's meaning.


Considering that it was more or less directly put onto the screen, I'd say it's pretty close.
 
2013-06-10 02:07:57 PM

spelletrader: It just so happens that homosexual rights are the current mainstream civil rights movement.


Not for Conservatives.
 
2013-06-10 02:16:19 PM
What, no Robocop is Jesus? fail list

/of course it's fail, it's cracked
 
2013-06-10 02:17:46 PM

CSM101: What, no Robocop is Jesus? fail list

/of course it's fail, it's cracked


I'm looking forward to after Man of Steel comes out and seeing the Cracked list of "Characters as Jesus allegory".
 
2013-06-10 02:20:06 PM

CSM101: What, no Robocop is Jesus? fail list

/of course it's fail, it's cracked


It would be easier to list characters who aren't Jesus allegories.
 
2013-06-10 02:21:25 PM

PizzaJedi81: spelletrader: It just so happens that homosexual rights are the current mainstream civil rights movement.

Not for Conservatives.


I think you're confusing "conservatives" with "fundies"...most conservatives I know are fine with gay rights. And I live in one of the reddest states in the country.
 
2013-06-10 02:24:17 PM
I'd be worried about anyone who didn't get the X-Men one.
 
2013-06-10 02:25:01 PM
I was tempted to add They Live to their list, but they made the allegory so obvious at the end of that one that you couldn't not notice unless you were asleep.
 
2013-06-10 02:25:45 PM
I was going along with The Big Lebowski's theory, but then I thought about Jackie Treehorn and the Chief of Police, and couldn't figure out how they represented castrated males. Does anyone have any thoughts about that?
 
2013-06-10 02:28:21 PM

Lord Dimwit: No Country for Old Men may or may not be about "retirement" - but I don't think so.


There are a couple of different stories at work there, but the entire purpose of Tommy Lee Jones' character is to show that he sees how the times have outpaced him and it's time for him to retire. It's not subtle or hidden at all. It's even the name of the goddamn movie -- that the rise of the violent drug trade makes this no longer a place for an old man like him.

Now, maybe if you cut out all of TLJ's scenes, you could make an argument that the movie has something more subtle to say about "retirement" (although the author of TFA leans on a pretty weak crutch by equating "retirement" from a job with "retirement" meaning murder). But it's a lot more muddled than the obvious-to-a-5-year-old meaning behind TLJ's character.
 
2013-06-10 02:28:53 PM
Huh. When Aliens came out, everyone from the studio who got within 10 feet of a microphone/camera was claiming it was a metaphor for the Marines who had been killed in the Beirut Bombing: the unloaded weapons, the inexperienced officers, etc.
 
2013-06-10 02:29:33 PM
Return of the Jedi was really about selling repackaged teddy bears.

/true fact
 
2013-06-10 02:29:36 PM

thecpt: That's a cool look at inception. The rest were no duhs or okay whatever.


And it was completely plagiarized from Devin Faraci of CHUD.com.

http://www.chud.com/24477/never-wake-up-the-meaning-and-secret-of-in ce ption/

TFA:
The evidence is kind of undeniable. First off, every member of the "Dream Hacker" squad has a role that corresponds with a role on a movie set: Eames (Tom Hardy) is the actor, because he can literally change faces -- sometimes while sitting in front of an actor's vanity mirror:

Ariadne (Ellen Page) is the screenwriter, because she designs the dreams; Saito (Ken Watanabe) is a studio executive, because he's paying for the whole thing; Cobb (Leonardo DiCaprio) is the director, the one with vision, the guy who can bring the whole thing together. Hell, he even looks like Christopher Nolan.

Joseph Gordon-Levitt's character, Arthur, is the producer, the guy who knows how it all works (that's why he speaks almost exclusively in expository dialogue), and Yusuf (good ol' Dileep Rao) is the special effects guy, because most of you forgot he existed and he probably never got his share of the bounty. It's no mistake that the coolest special effects moment in the movie only happens because of something he did, and the movie specifically points out that he gets no credit for it:

Finally, Dom Cobb and the Inceptors' mission is remarkably similar to the mission of a moviemaker: they want to change the way someone (in this case, Cillian Murphy's character) thinks about the world -- like any artist. Even the strategies they discuss (focusing on positive emotion instead of negative emotion, and not "disturbing the subconscious" by changing the rules out of nowhere) are movie-making tactics: You got to establish rules for your movie universe, and you can't break them, or the audience chases you with motorcycles and stabs you to death.


Devin Faraci's CHUD.com article on the movie:
The heist team quite neatly maps to major players in a film production. Cobb is the director while Arthur, the guy who does the research and who sets up the places to sleep, is the producer. Ariadne, the dream architect, is the screenwriter - she creates the world that will be entered. Eames is the actor (this is so obvious that the character sits at an old fashioned mirrored vanity, the type which stage actors would use). Yusuf is the technical guy; remember, the Oscar come from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, and it requires a good number of technically minded people to get a movie off the ground.

That leaves two key figures. Saito is the money guy, the big corporate suit who fancies himself a part of the game. And Fischer, the mark, is the audience. Cobb, as a director, takes Fischer through an engaging, stimulating and exciting journey, one that leads him to an understanding about himself. Cobb is the big time movie director (or rather the best version of that - certainly not a Michael Bay) who brings the action, who brings the spectacle, but who also brings the meaning and the humanity and the emotion
.
 
2013-06-10 02:31:10 PM
The Fast and the Furious:  Tokyo Drift is really about the Embargo Act of 1807.
 
2013-06-10 02:34:26 PM

Lady Beryl Ersatz-Wendigo: The Fast and the Furious:  Tokyo Drift is really about the Embargo Act of 1807.


xXx was about the Teapot Dome Scandal.
 
2013-06-10 02:36:47 PM
Did Subby mean: who wasn't aware of this symbolism? X-men in particularly hits you over the head with the non-stop talk of people being born that way and having no choice but to act like a mutant.
 
2013-06-10 02:38:54 PM

spelletrader: The whole X-men anti-mutant thing was originally more focused on race than sexuality. The comic kicked off in the early 60's and focused on prejudice and racism quite often. It just so happens that homosexual rights are the current mainstream civil rights movement.


Did you read the article?  They specifically addressed that, saying almost the same thing, that X-men was originally about the civil rights movement.  However, "it just so happens" isn't quite accurate here, as the producers, writers and director intentionally shifted the focus to gay rights.
 
2013-06-10 02:41:25 PM
Did anyone else catch that "The Big Lebowski is the  Citizen Kane of movies,"
 
2013-06-10 02:44:24 PM
Not sure how the Aliens symbolism was supposed to be hard to get when the director himself tells you in the commentary that the Marines were supposed to be like Vietnam draftees at the end of multiple tours.
 
2013-06-10 02:44:48 PM
Everyone raved about the sparing use of the shark in `Jaws' - claiming that having the villain unseen helped build the tension & fear.
Truth was the mechanical shark was a piece of schitt that never worked properly.
 
2013-06-10 02:46:50 PM

gunga galunga: thecpt: That's a cool look at inception. The rest were no duhs or okay whatever.

And it was completely plagiarized from Devin Faraci of CHUD.com.

http://www.chud.com/24477/never-wake-up-the-meaning-and-secret-of-in ce ption/


I can't believe I'm defending a Cracked article, but... Though he doesn't site where he's getting this information from, the author isn't presenting these ideas as his own. That's one form of plagiarism. The 2nd type, is also no present, as the author isn't just copy/pasting without citation.

Anyway, it isn't plagiarism, and I don't even know why I care enough to correct you.
 
2013-06-10 02:47:25 PM
*cite...for fark's sake
 
2013-06-10 02:47:36 PM
The Muppets take Manhattan is about the Bataan Death March.
 
2013-06-10 02:47:52 PM

timujin: Did you read the article?


This is Fark, that answer is self evident.
 
2013-06-10 02:48:48 PM
When I go to movies I pay to be entertained, so I completely detach my brain.  I'll fess up I didn't catch any of the hidden meanings.

/But I thought Green Lantern, GI Joe 2, and Ghost Rider 2 weren't that bad, either.
//I like mental cotton candy to detach from day-to-day politics or looking for -isms everywhere.
 
2013-06-10 02:49:45 PM
James Cameron's Aliens, the godfather of sci-fi action movies

...And thus, with the very first sentence of the article, I stopped reading
 
2013-06-10 02:50:00 PM

phoenix352: Did anyone else catch that "The Big Lebowski is the  Citizen Kane of movies,"


IDK- did anyone else read the thread?
 
2013-06-10 02:52:28 PM

Uzzah: Lord Dimwit: No Country for Old Men may or may not be about "retirement" - but I don't think so.

There are a couple of different stories at work there, but the entire purpose of Tommy Lee Jones' character is to show that he sees how the times have outpaced him and it's time for him to retire. It's not subtle or hidden at all. It's even the name of the goddamn movie -- that the rise of the violent drug trade makes this no longer a place for an old man like him.

Now, maybe if you cut out all of TLJ's scenes, you could make an argument that the movie has something more subtle to say about "retirement" (although the author of TFA leans on a pretty weak crutch by equating "retirement" from a job with "retirement" meaning murder). But it's a lot more muddled than the obvious-to-a-5-year-old meaning behind TLJ's character.


His bookends to the movie - his opening narration and his closing monologue to his wife - make me think differently. His opening narration talks about how he's a lawman and his father and his father too. His ending monologue talks about how he has a dream where there's a fire in the darkness lit by his father and it's the only light in the darkness and "then I woke up."

To me that says that for generations we've been trying to impose order and meaning on things with laws and rules, and at the end he dreams that law and order is a light in the darkness - and then he wakes up, realizing his disillusionment. Chigurgh says as much: "If the rule you followed brought you to this place, of what use was the rule?"
 
2013-06-10 02:55:12 PM

redsquid: phoenix352: Did anyone else catch that "The Big Lebowski is the  Citizen Kane of movies,"

IDK- did anyone else read the thread?


Clearly not, skimmed it at best.
 
2013-06-10 02:57:13 PM

Lord Dimwit: Uzzah: Lord Dimwit: No Country for Old Men may or may not be about "retirement" - but I don't think so.

There are a couple of different stories at work there, but the entire purpose of Tommy Lee Jones' character is to show that he sees how the times have outpaced him and it's time for him to retire. It's not subtle or hidden at all. It's even the name of the goddamn movie -- that the rise of the violent drug trade makes this no longer a place for an old man like him.

Now, maybe if you cut out all of TLJ's scenes, you could make an argument that the movie has something more subtle to say about "retirement" (although the author of TFA leans on a pretty weak crutch by equating "retirement" from a job with "retirement" meaning murder). But it's a lot more muddled than the obvious-to-a-5-year-old meaning behind TLJ's character.

His bookends to the movie - his opening narration and his closing monologue to his wife - make me think differently. His opening narration talks about how he's a lawman and his father and his father too. His ending monologue talks about how he has a dream where there's a fire in the darkness lit by his father and it's the only light in the darkness and "then I woke up."

To me that says that for generations we've been trying to impose order and meaning on things with laws and rules, and at the end he dreams that law and order is a light in the darkness - and then he wakes up, realizing his disillusionment. Chigurgh says as much: "If the rule you followed brought you to this place, of what use was the rule?"


And the purpose of showing his Uncle was to show that after a lifetime of fighting for the law, nothing has changed except that now you're an old man alone.
 
2013-06-10 03:06:55 PM
The only movie on that list that I've actually seen is The Big Lebowski,   and if you think it's about "metaphorical castration" (whatever that is) well then,   that's just like your opinion,  maaan,
 
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