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(DOD Buzz)   THE US NAVY WILL NO LONGER USE ALL-CAPS for its messages   (dodbuzz.com) divider line 47
    More: Interesting, Cyber Command, Joseph Holstead  
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4571 clicks; posted to Main » on 10 Jun 2013 at 8:23 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



47 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-06-10 08:25:01 AM
good for them
 
2013-06-10 08:26:50 AM
it's a capital idea
 
2013-06-10 08:27:38 AM
WELCOME TO THE 21ST CENTURY.  ha hi & ;-p
 
2013-06-10 08:28:16 AM
I DON'T APPROVE OF THIS CHANGE.
 
2013-06-10 08:30:54 AM
Oh my gawd, this is outstanding. I often have to read these things as part of my job AND IT ALWAYS SEEMS LIKE I'M BEING YELLED AT. ALL THE ACRONYMS AND WORDS FLOW TOGETHER INTO A BIG MISHMASH AND MAKE IT HARD FOR ME TO READ. Sometimes, I even dump everything into Word and change it to "sentence case" and just deal with the lower-case acronyms.
 
2013-06-10 08:31:16 AM
BACK IN MY DAY, LETTERS WERE AS TALL AS MOUNTAINS. IT TOOK SIX PEOPLE JUST TO WRITE THE LETTER Q. AND WE LIKED IT THAT WAY!
 
2013-06-10 08:33:10 AM
"The CAPability has been there for about a year" to send routine messages in lower case, said Lt. Joseph Holstead, a spokesman for the Cyber Command. The next step will be to expand that capability to secret and top secret messages, possibly in August, Holstead said.

Great. Just great. these guys have nukes, too.
About a year, now?
And soon they can use it with top secret messages?
Great.
 
2013-06-10 08:33:12 AM
I don't know if this is such a good idea.  Messages need to be in all CAPS so that they can be read over the sounds of ship & aircraft engines.
 
2013-06-10 08:33:47 AM

To The Escape Zeppelin!: I DON'T APPROVE OF THIS CHANGE.


Who are you? Billy Mays?
 
d23 [TotalFark]
2013-06-10 08:35:44 AM
..it's like yelling!
 
2013-06-10 08:36:11 AM
Wait till they find all the different Fonts.
 
2013-06-10 08:38:13 AM
How else will we know when we MUST CONSTRUCT ADDITIONAL PYLONS?
 
2013-06-10 08:45:42 AM
OMG! THINK OF THE ACRONYMS!!!

This is one of the best ideas the Navy's come up with since scrapping sail power.
USS Constitution excepted of course.

/CNRF underling
 
2013-06-10 08:46:55 AM
blogs.amctv.com

*wonders if its possible to send the dimensions of the playmate of the month in caps*
 
2013-06-10 08:52:12 AM
Does this have anything to do with deep-sea sub communications happening at such a horrendously slow baud rate, so using smaller character sets is an important and useful way to increase message transmission speed?  I've never been in the Navy, so I have no idea.
 
2013-06-10 09:15:27 AM

Deep Contact: Wait till they find all the different Fonts.


i.imgur.com
 
2013-06-10 09:20:00 AM

Nightjars: Does this have anything to do with deep-sea sub communications happening at such a horrendously slow baud rate, so using smaller character sets is an important and useful way to increase message transmission speed?  I've never been in the Navy, so I have no idea.


It's a vestige of transmitting messages over HF-radio encrypted teletype with equipment backwards compatible to systems .
 
2013-06-10 09:26:25 AM

jackmalice: Nightjars: Does this have anything to do with deep-sea sub communications happening at such a horrendously slow baud rate, so using smaller character sets is an important and useful way to increase message transmission speed?  I've never been in the Navy, so I have no idea.

It's a vestige of transmitting messages over HF-radio encrypted teletype with equipment backwards compatible to systems .


This is also why NOAA forecasts and alerts are still in all caps...,maybe one day they'll make the switch too.
Until then, I'll still get a kick out of seeing things like 'TODAY...SUNNY WITH A HIGH OF 74 AND A LIGHT BREEZE FROM THE WEST'
being transmitted with the same 'ugency' as 'THERE IS A LARGE TORNADO HEADING TOWARD YOUR CITY. SEEK SHELTER OR YOU WILL DIE'
 
2013-06-10 09:40:35 AM
So now the Navy is no longer ready to unleash the fury?

/one of my more favourite CAPS LOCK meme pics
// along with 'CAPS LOCK FARK YEAH!' megaphone guy
 
2013-06-10 09:46:34 AM
Is the last AOL customer now AWOL???
 
2013-06-10 09:47:32 AM
AWW. I WILL MISS THIS.

/THIS IS GREENE POINT LIGHTHOUSE. YOUR CALL.
/+1 each to doyner and Arkanaut for funny. I snorked.
 
2013-06-10 10:13:15 AM
Mixed case and Comic Sans will be the standard going forward.
 
2013-06-10 10:18:23 AM

Prank Call of Cthulhu: Oh my gawd, this is outstanding. I often have to read these things as part of my job AND IT ALWAYS SEEMS LIKE I'M BEING YELLED AT. ALL THE ACRONYMS AND WORDS FLOW TOGETHER INTO A BIG MISHMASH AND MAKE IT HARD FOR ME TO READ. Sometimes, I even dump everything into Word and change it to "sentence case" and just deal with the lower-case acronyms.


I always found it quite over-stimulating leafing through EXORDs and whatnot, pages and pages of single-spaced, all-caps jargon trying to find the important and applicable-to-my-ship's orders.  It is really unpleasant reading.

Deep Contact: Wait till they find all the different Fonts.


Don't say that.  Please don't even think that too loudly!
 
2013-06-10 10:27:34 AM
When will the National Weather Service stop using all caps for its messages too?


HAZARDOUS WEATHER OUTLOOKNATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE DETROIT/PONTIAC MI404 AM EDT MON JUN 10 2013
MIZ047>049-053>055-060>063-068>070-075-076-082-083-110815-MIDLAND-BAY -HURON-SAGINAW-TUSCOLA-SANILAC-SHIAWASSEE-GENESEE-LAPEER-ST. CLAIR-LIVINGSTON-OAKLAND-MACOMB-WASHTENAW-WAYNE-LENAWEE-MONROE-404 AM EDT MON JUN 10 2013THIS HAZARDOUS WEATHER OUTLOOK IS FOR SOUTHEAST MICHIGAN..DAY ONE...TODAY AND TONIGHT ....
 
2013-06-10 10:32:31 AM
It's about goddamn time.

Farking HATED naval messaging.
 
2013-06-10 10:33:45 AM
Message hell is the bottom copy of a all-caps message.
 
2013-06-10 11:03:10 AM
Hard to believe that there are still systems out there that can only handle CAPs
Loved working on the Teletypes. Those things were a work of genius, pieces of art.
 
2013-06-10 11:03:52 AM
CAN YOU HEAR ME NOW?

NSA - yes. No need to shout, dammit.
 
2013-06-10 11:22:57 AM

WelldeadLink: Deep Contact: Wait till they find all the different Fonts.

[i.imgur.com image 339x425]



HE SAID "FONTS"...
 
2013-06-10 11:31:50 AM
So what, they replaced timeplex finally?

/NCT R KKKK
 
2013-06-10 11:47:06 AM
DRINK YOUR OVAL...
 
2013-06-10 11:54:44 AM

id10ts: OMG! THINK OF THE ACRONYMS!!!

This is one of the best ideas the Navy's come up with since scrapping sail power.
USS Constitution excepted of course.

/CNRF underling


NEGATIVE, THIS IS AN OUTRAGE.
 
2013-06-10 11:56:01 AM
doyner:
I don't know if this is such a good idea.  Messages need to be in all CAPS so that they can be read over the sounds of ship & aircraft engines.

LOL!!!! Farkin' brilliant. I'm using that next time on onboard.
 
2013-06-10 12:15:50 PM

Grumpy Cat: BACK IN MY DAY, LETTERS WERE AS TALL AS MOUNTAINS. IT TOOK SIX PEOPLE JUST TO WRITE THE LETTER Q. AND WE LIKED IT THAT WAY!


doyner: I don't know if this is such a good idea.  Messages need to be in all CAPS so that they can be read over the sounds of ship & aircraft engines.


Fun-ny!

At least now we'll be able to tell when our CO is actually yelling at us or about us or about something... so, no change then, really.
 
2013-06-10 12:25:11 PM

Grumpy Cat: BACK IN MY DAY, LETTERS WERE AS TALL AS MOUNTAINS. IT TOOK SIX PEOPLE JUST TO WRITE THE LETTER Q. AND WE LIKED IT THAT WAY!


upload.wikimedia.org
WE APOLOGIZE FOR THE INCONVENIENCE.
 
2013-06-10 12:25:29 PM

factoryconnection: Deep Contact: Wait till they find all the different Fonts.

Don't say that.  Please don't even think that too loudly!


Comic Sans for everybody!
 
2013-06-10 01:04:04 PM

Seraphym: Grumpy Cat: BACK IN MY DAY, LETTERS WERE AS TALL AS MOUNTAINS. IT TOOK SIX PEOPLE JUST TO WRITE THE LETTER Q. AND WE LIKED IT THAT WAY!

doyner: I don't know if this is such a good idea.  Messages need to be in all CAPS so that they can be read over the sounds of ship & aircraft engines.

Fun-ny!

At least now we'll be able to tell when our CO is actually yelling at us or about us or about something... so, no change then, really.


Great....Now The Radio Operators Will Be Scrutinized If They Have A Bad Habit of Capitalizing Every Word Too.  Or Not Capitalizing capt.
 
2013-06-10 01:19:32 PM
True Story.  I worked for a contractor back in the 80's and 90's, doing work for the Navy at the Naval Research Lab in Washington, DC.  We occasionally needed to send source code updates, etc., to our field sites.  These messages went out over the SOCOMMS system, which was limited to 5-bit BAUDOT code (not even full ASCII).  My understanding was that this character-encoding scheme was a legacy from the days of KSR-33 Teletype terminals and punched paper tape.

With a 5-biatcharacter set, we were limited to upper-case alphabetic, numeric, and a (very small) subset of punctuation and special characters.

This was fine for us; our code was in FORTRAN, written for mainframes, so all our updates worked fine in that character set.

Then we started converting from Mainframes and FORTRAN to microcomputers and 'C'.  This, obviously, was a problem.

I wrote a utility for us, called 'XLATE'.  It would take an input file as a stream of bytes, LZW-compress it, and output it as a text file containing a series of bytes, each byte written as an ASCII-text hexadecimal pair, so all we needed were 0-9 and A-F (uppercase, of course).  This could be transmitted over the SOCOMMS circuits, and let us send not only C source code, but binaries as well.

The program could, of course, reconstitute a translated file back into its original form.

Some other nifty features of XLATE were that output lines were capped at the max length that the SOCOMMS system could handle, and it did a CRC checksum of the original as it was translated, with the CRC appended at the end of the translated file.  During reconstitution, the rebuilt file was CRC checksummed, and the reconstituted checksum was compared the one in the file trailer.

There was also an option in the program to Triplicate the output file - each output line was written three times.  During reconstitution, three lines would then be read in and compared, and if there were any hex-pair discrepancies, if two 'bytes' matched, that was what was used in the reconstitution.

I had to write that program three times - once for the IBM PC-compatible systems (written in Turbo Pascal), once for UNIX-based SUN workstations (written in C), and once for the FORTRAN-based mainframes (written in FORTRAN).  And each system had its own way of storing a text file and delimiting an end-of-line.

Finally, a translated file from any of these systems could be successfully reconstituted on any other platform.

Interesting work, and I still have the Pascal source code.  It's kinda nice, in a way, to see that it is no longer needed.
 
2013-06-10 01:20:52 PM
RYRYRYR
 
2013-06-10 01:24:21 PM
Nightjars: Does this have anything to do with deep-sea sub communications happening at such a horrendously slow baud rate, so using smaller character sets is an important and useful way to increase message transmission speed?  I've never been in the Navy, so I have no idea.

Nope, not the same thing.  The all-caps requirement was because the secure COMMS system was based on old legacy Teletype standards.  Those circuits connected bases on land.  Communicating with submarines was slow because it takes a very long carrier wave to penetrate the water and reach a submerged boat.

The extremely long carrier wave necessitates a low transmission speed.  As I understand it, those systems are typically used to send only very short messages to a particular boat that it needs to surface so that faster comms systems can be used to send the real message.
 
2013-06-10 02:26:55 PM
www.english.illinois.edu

approves
 
2013-06-10 02:35:23 PM
Lowercase used to be the snob style making fun of those who couldn't afford it.   That's why unix commands are lc, since the big commercial machines of the day couldn't do that.  You know who you are IBM.

Upper and lower case serif type is really much more understandable and readable.
 
2013-06-10 04:05:42 PM

ciberido: Grumpy Cat: BACK IN MY DAY, LETTERS WERE AS TALL AS MOUNTAINS. IT TOOK SIX PEOPLE JUST TO WRITE THE LETTER Q. AND WE LIKED IT THAT WAY!

[upload.wikimedia.org image 240x262]
WE APOLOGIZE FOR THE INCONVENIENCE.


I was thinking more of the collapsed Sirius Cybernetics moto which now reads: GO STICK YOUR HEAD IN A PIG...

/But, god's final message works too...
 
2013-06-10 05:40:41 PM

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: Nightjars: Does this have anything to do with deep-sea sub communications happening at such a horrendously slow baud rate, so using smaller character sets is an important and useful way to increase message transmission speed?  I've never been in the Navy, so I have no idea.

Nope, not the same thing.  The all-caps requirement was because the secure COMMS system was based on old legacy Teletype standards.  Those circuits connected bases on land.  Communicating with submarines was slow because it takes a very long carrier wave to penetrate the water and reach a submerged boat.

The extremely long carrier wave necessitates a low transmission speed.  As I understand it, those systems are typically used to send only very short messages to a particular boat that it needs to surface so that faster comms systems can be used to send the real message.


Cool, thanks.  Sounds like its still actually basically the same thing - reduce the size of the character set in order to reduce the amount of data that has to be sent (and therefore reduce the amount of time it takes to send that data), whether it be for a teletype, or a low transmission speed submarine communication.
 
2013-06-10 08:29:35 PM
BZ!
 
2013-06-10 08:55:39 PM

Arkanaut: How else will we know when we MUST CONSTRUCT ADDITIONAL PYLONS?


i.imgur.com
 
2013-06-10 09:05:47 PM

buzzcut73: This is also why NOAA forecasts and alerts are still in all caps...,maybe one day they'll make the switch too.
Until then, I'll still get a kick out of seeing things like 'TODAY...SUNNY WITH A HIGH OF 74 AND A LIGHT BREEZE FROM THE WEST'
being transmitted with the same 'ugency' as 'THERE IS A LARGE TORNADO HEADING TOWARD YOUR CITY. SEEK SHELTER OR YOU WILL DIE'


As someone who has been woken up in the middle of the night by the weather radio going off and listening to the TTS announcer on NOAA Weather Radio  a lot in recent weeks, I can just about recite it from memory.  THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE AT TULSA HAS ISSUED A TORNADO WARNING FOR ____.  IF YOU ARE IN THE WARNED AREA, TAKE COVER NOW!  NIGHT TIME TORNADOES ARE ESPECIALLY DANGEROUS.  IF YOU WAIT UNTIL YOU CAN SEE OR HEAR THE TORNADO, IT MAY BE TOO LATE TO REACH A SAFE LOCATION.  TAKE COVER NOW!  PRECAUTIONARY ACTION: TAKE COVER NOW!  MOVE TO THE LOWEST LEVEL OF A SOLID BUILDING AND AVOID WINDOWS AND DOORS.  MOBILE HOMES AND VEHICLES SHOULD BE ABANDONED FOR MORE SUBSTANTIAL SHELTER.  REPEATING: THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE...
 
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