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(Reuters)   Good news everyone, that asteroid we discovered yesterday just missed us   (reuters.com) divider line 37
    More: Scary, asteroids, NASA, Earth, communication satellites, Southern Ocean, Chelyabinsk, closest approach, Tasmania  
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4712 clicks; posted to Geek » on 08 Jun 2013 at 12:56 PM (44 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-06-08 12:22:28 PM
Note: the more dangerous it is, the more likely we'll notice it sooner. Thus, while an impact would have been bad, it probably would not have been too bad.

If by "small truck", let's go on the like high end for that, about 10 meters.

Per Wikipedia one those airbursts in the atmosphere about every 10 years. Yet how many have we heard of? Can you name any? The Chelyabinsk meteor was roughly 20 meters, and hit a populated area, and while it did quite a bit of damage, it was hardly "catastrophic" in a general sense.

Most will airburst over the ocean, about 72% of the surface of the planet. Add Antarctica, which is about 9% IIRC, and that's about 4/5 of them exploding in the skies above places no one is likely to notice or care.

Not much of a threat, but by all means preppers, keep helping the economy while building caches for me to raid just in case.
 
2013-06-08 12:56:03 PM

Sid_6.7: Note: the more dangerous it is, the more likely we'll notice it sooner. Thus, while an impact would have been bad, it probably would not have been too bad.

If by "small truck", let's go on the like high end for that, about 10 meters.

Per Wikipedia one those airbursts in the atmosphere about every 10 years. Yet how many have we heard of? Can you name any? The Chelyabinsk meteor was roughly 20 meters, and hit a populated area, and while it did quite a bit of damage, it was hardly "catastrophic" in a general sense.

Most will airburst over the ocean, about 72% of the surface of the planet. Add Antarctica, which is about 9% IIRC, and that's about 4/5 of them exploding in the skies above places no one is likely to notice or care.

Not much of a threat, but by all means preppers, keep helping the economy while building caches for me to raid just in case.


My "cache" consists of one case of MREs, water, flashlights and a camping stove. Been screwed by hurricanes before.
 
2013-06-08 01:11:19 PM
WHY THE HELL AREN'T WE NUKING THESE DAMN SPACE ROCKS WHILE WE STILL CAN?
 
2013-06-08 01:14:17 PM
jehovahs witness protection:
My "cache" consists of one case of MREs, water, flashlights and a camping stove.

Mine just has a logbook, 3 golf balls, some broken McDonalds toys and a travel bug.
 
2013-06-08 01:17:11 PM

Sid_6.7: Most will airburst over the ocean, about 72% of the surface of the planet. Add Antarctica, which is about 9% IIRC, and that's about 4/5 of them exploding in the skies above places no one is likely to notice or care.


Further than that, the way that humanity's population is concentrated in the 1/5 we do care about drops it by like another 99.99%, even if it knocks over a town pretty much every part of the world deals with that level of harm on a regular basis (in the US, yearly tornado/hurricane season is probably usually worse).
 
2013-06-08 01:25:35 PM
Hmm, 10 meters. The Chelyabinsk meteor was about 20, maybe 30m and so some 8 to 27 times as massive... Yep, this is just on the side of not worrying too much.
 
2013-06-08 01:37:11 PM

jehovahs witness protection: Sid_6.7: Note: the more dangerous it is, the more likely we'll notice it sooner. Thus, while an impact would have been bad, it probably would not have been too bad.

If by "small truck", let's go on the like high end for that, about 10 meters.

Per Wikipedia one those airbursts in the atmosphere about every 10 years. Yet how many have we heard of? Can you name any? The Chelyabinsk meteor was roughly 20 meters, and hit a populated area, and while it did quite a bit of damage, it was hardly "catastrophic" in a general sense.

Most will airburst over the ocean, about 72% of the surface of the planet. Add Antarctica, which is about 9% IIRC, and that's about 4/5 of them exploding in the skies above places no one is likely to notice or care.

Not much of a threat, but by all means preppers, keep helping the economy while building caches for me to raid just in case.

My "cache" consists of one case of MREs, water, flashlights and a camping stove. Been screwed by hurricanes before.


Then you're not really a "prepper". You're just prepared.

Also, this is why we shouldn't be cutting funding to NASA.
 
2013-06-08 01:39:25 PM

Suckmaster Burstingfoam: WHY THE HELL AREN'T WE NUKING THESE DAMN SPACE ROCKS WHILE WE STILL CAN?


LOL

nekom: jehovahs witness protection:
My "cache" consists of one case of MREs, water, flashlights and a camping stove.

Mine just has a logbook, 3 golf balls, some broken McDonalds toys and a travel bug.


ROFL

this sounds like a fark contest: who can come up with the most absurd cache!

my cache:
bottle of astroglide,
family sized box of kleenex
September 1984 issue of Penthouse (because I can FINALLY look at neked vanessa williams)
 
2013-06-08 01:54:06 PM
"There is theoretically a collision possible between asteroids and planet Earth," astronomer Gianluca Masi, with the Virtual Telescope project, said

You don't say.
 
2013-06-08 01:54:56 PM

nekom: jehovahs witness protection:
My "cache" consists of one case of MREs, water, flashlights and a camping stove.

Mine just has a logbook, 3 golf balls, some broken McDonalds toys and a travel bug.


Mine...

  25.media.tumblr.com
 
kth
2013-06-08 02:25:32 PM

nekom: jehovahs witness protection:
My "cache" consists of one case of MREs, water, flashlights and a camping stove.

Mine just has a logbook, 3 golf balls, some broken McDonalds toys and a travel bug.


Geocaching taught my nieces the tragedy of the commons. The brand new ones had cool stuff, the older ones had 3 golfballs and some broken McDonald's toys.

I also taught them socialism, as I wouldn't let them take their own toys out of the geocache. They had to share the toys that they picked out to put in there.
 
2013-06-08 02:28:53 PM
10 meters? IIRC from playing with NASA's asteroid simulator it can't even reach the ground unless it's nearly pure nickel-iron (a rare variety).
 
2013-06-08 02:58:54 PM
I forget who said it, but Asteroids are natures' way of asking "how's that space program coming along?"
 
2013-06-08 03:00:53 PM
What a lovely day.  The flowers are blooming, the birds are singing.

WHOOMP!
 
2013-06-08 04:58:42 PM

namatad: Suckmaster Burstingfoam: WHY THE HELL AREN'T WE NUKING THESE DAMN SPACE ROCKS WHILE WE STILL CAN?

LOL

nekom: jehovahs witness protection:
My "cache" consists of one case of MREs, water, flashlights and a camping stove.

Mine just has a logbook, 3 golf balls, some broken McDonalds toys and a travel bug.

ROFL

this sounds like a fark contest: who can come up with the most absurd cache!

my cache:
bottle of astroglide,
family sized box of kleenex
September 1984 issue of Penthouse (because I can FINALLY look at neked vanessa williams)


My kit:
1 shoelace, missing aglets
3 bottles of miller light from '04
1 Ball peen hammer
2 unopened packages of Garbage Pal Kid cards.
A 3D veiwmaster with screenshots from the Teen Mom sex tape.
 
2013-06-08 05:21:49 PM
An object of that size hit the planet about 65 million years ago in what is now Mexico's Yucatan peninsula, triggering a global climate change that is believed to be responsible for the demise of the dinosaurs

Sure but did it have four wheels and a flat bed like a truck?
 
2013-06-08 05:40:09 PM
I had to leave town in an emergency situation a few years ago. Grabbed all identifying paperwork and all cash, my cat, my computer tower, and a few day's change of clothes. I had no idea I'd be able to go back three days later to get my stuff.

It's amazing what you discover you can live without when the shiat really hits the fan.
 
2013-06-08 06:21:46 PM

jehovahs witness protection: My "cache" consists of one case of MREs, water, flashlights and a camping stove. Been screwed by hurricanes before


Let's see: one forty-five caliber automatic; two boxes of ammunition; four days' concentrated emergency rations; one drug issue containing antibiotics, morphine, vitamin pills, pep pills, sleeping pills, tranquilizer pills; one miniature combination Russian phrase book and Bible; one hundred dollars in rubles; one hundred dollars in gold; nine packs of chewing gum; one issue of prophylactics; three lipsticks; three pair of nylon stockings....

Shoot, a fella' could have a pretty good weekend in Vegas with all that stuff.
 
2013-06-08 06:24:58 PM

jehovahs witness protection: Sid_6.7: Note: the more dangerous it is, the more likely we'll notice it sooner. Thus, while an impact would have been bad, it probably would not have been too bad.

If by "small truck", let's go on the like high end for that, about 10 meters.

Per Wikipedia one those airbursts in the atmosphere about every 10 years. Yet how many have we heard of? Can you name any? The Chelyabinsk meteor was roughly 20 meters, and hit a populated area, and while it did quite a bit of damage, it was hardly "catastrophic" in a general sense.

Most will airburst over the ocean, about 72% of the surface of the planet. Add Antarctica, which is about 9% IIRC, and that's about 4/5 of them exploding in the skies above places no one is likely to notice or care.

Not much of a threat, but by all means preppers, keep helping the economy while building caches for me to raid just in case.

My "cache" consists of one case of MREs, water, flashlights and a camping stove. Been screwed by hurricanes before.


I feel your pain. We stock up a bit in the spring just in case we get hit. Then theres the guns and ammo, but those are present year round.
 
2013-06-08 06:59:47 PM
65,000 miles

That is not "just missed us".  That is "came nowhere f*cking near us".
 
2013-06-08 07:07:42 PM
WTF does 4 times closer mean?

Is it like 100% faster?
 
2013-06-08 07:59:52 PM

SoundOfOneHandWanking: WTF does 4 times closer mean?

Is it like 100% faster?


^ This.
 
2013-06-08 08:25:54 PM
My cache has big giant family Bible with brass hinges. When the fundamentalists come out after the apocalypse, I plan to whack them on the head with it and take their stuff. They won't be expecting that.
 
2013-06-08 08:31:17 PM

brantgoose: My cache has big giant family Bible with brass hinges. When the fundamentalists come out after the apocalypse, I plan to whack them on the head with it and take their stuff. They won't be expecting that.


Why not just use a tree branch?

media.sdreader.com
 
2013-06-08 09:44:13 PM

Strangelove MD: nekom: jehovahs witness protection:
My "cache" consists of one case of MREs, water, flashlights and a camping stove.

Mine just has a logbook, 3 golf balls, some broken McDonalds toys and a travel bug.

Mine...

  [25.media.tumblr.com image 500x386]


Bastard! Always one step ahead of me!
 
2013-06-08 09:53:56 PM

HotWingAgenda: 65,000 miles

That is not "just missed us".  That is "came nowhere f*cking near us".


Astronomically, that's a near miss. That's 1/2 of a 'light second'
 
2013-06-08 10:00:14 PM

Somacandra: jehovahs witness protection: My "cache" consists of one case of MREs, water, flashlights and a camping stove. Been screwed by hurricanes before

Let's see: one forty-five caliber automatic; two boxes of ammunition; four days' concentrated emergency rations; one drug issue containing antibiotics, morphine, vitamin pills, pep pills, sleeping pills, tranquilizer pills; one miniature combination Russian phrase book and Bible; one hundred dollars in rubles; one hundred dollars in gold; nine packs of chewing gum; one issue of prophylactics; three lipsticks; three pair of nylon stockings....

Shoot, a fella' could have a pretty good weekend in Vegas with all that stuff.


Is your other name Hunter S. Thompson?
 
2013-06-08 10:02:15 PM

Brainsick: HotWingAgenda: 65,000 miles

That is not "just missed us".  That is "came nowhere f*cking near us".

Astronomically, that's a near miss. That's 1/2 of a 'light second'


And compared to a homeless guy living in a dumpster, I'm "relatively famous".  65,000 miles may be closer than the nearest star, but that does not make it close.
 
2013-06-08 10:30:30 PM
HotWingAgenda:

And compared to a homeless guy living in a dumpster, I'm "relatively

Actually you are relatively the same smell. An asteroid within 1/4 the distance to the moon is damn farking close.
 
2013-06-08 11:19:38 PM

Goatwhore: SoundOfOneHandWanking: WTF does 4 times closer mean?

Is it like 100% faster?

^ This.


4 times closer than our regular strength coffee.
 
2013-06-08 11:44:10 PM
So, do we have an annoying race of pachyderms with terrible aim shooting rocks at us? Or has this been happening all along, and we were just blissfully unaware of the quantity of stuff playing chicken with our gravity well?
 
2013-06-09 02:27:52 AM

Aye Carumba: HotWingAgenda:

And compared to a homeless guy living in a dumpster, I'm "relatively

Actually you are relatively the same smell. An asteroid within 1/4 the distance to the moon is damn farking close.


There are manmade satellites orbiting the Earth at greater distances. At the approach velocity of one of these asteroids, 65,000 miles takes about 2 seconds to cross.

Relatively speaking, it's as close of an approach as your car makes when passing a roadside gas station. Compared to shooting at a typical bull's-eye target, this'd be on the paper, if not somewhere around the 7-point ring.
 
2013-06-09 02:29:45 AM

Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy: 65,000 miles

takes about 2 seconds to cross

Disregard this, I am retarded.

Mixing up miles and meters.
 
2013-06-09 03:43:10 AM

Stone Meadow: 10 meters? IIRC from playing with NASA's asteroid simulator it can't even reach the ground unless it's nearly pure nickel-iron (a rare variety).


The thing that Chelyabinsk taught people was humility. There were a lot of people counting on that size not being able to cause damage. It didn't kill anyone, right? but it couldve, there was broken glass and spines and such. The trick was it came in low and slow. NiFe or not that's potentially somebody's problem. Even with no crater the airburst was humongous and well to hear it from some of the people who think about this, airburst damage was not something generally on folks' radar.
 
2013-06-09 05:43:39 AM

Somacandra: jehovahs witness protection: My "cache" consists of one case of MREs, water, flashlights and a camping stove. Been screwed by hurricanes before

Let's see: one forty-five caliber automatic; two boxes of ammunition; four days' concentrated emergency rations; one drug issue containing antibiotics, morphine, vitamin pills, pep pills, sleeping pills, tranquilizer pills; one miniature combination Russian phrase book and Bible; one hundred dollars in rubles; one hundred dollars in gold; nine packs of chewing gum; one issue of prophylactics; three lipsticks; three pair of nylon stockings....

Shoot, a fella' could have a pretty good weekend in Vegas with all that stuff.


I read that with the voice of Slim Pickens in my head.

Well done!
 
2013-06-09 03:03:48 PM

glmorrs1: jehovahs witness protection: Sid_6.7: Note: the more dangerous it is, the more likely we'll notice it sooner. Thus, while an impact would have been bad, it probably would not have been too bad.

If by "small truck", let's go on the like high end for that, about 10 meters.

Per Wikipedia one those airbursts in the atmosphere about every 10 years. Yet how many have we heard of? Can you name any? The Chelyabinsk meteor was roughly 20 meters, and hit a populated area, and while it did quite a bit of damage, it was hardly "catastrophic" in a general sense.

Most will airburst over the ocean, about 72% of the surface of the planet. Add Antarctica, which is about 9% IIRC, and that's about 4/5 of them exploding in the skies above places no one is likely to notice or care.

Not much of a threat, but by all means preppers, keep helping the economy while building caches for me to raid just in case.

My "cache" consists of one case of MREs, water, flashlights and a camping stove. Been screwed by hurricanes before.

Then you're not really a "prepper". You're just prepared.

Also, this is why we shouldn't be cutting funding to NASA.


What is the set number of days you can live without outside help before you go from "prepared" to "prepper"?
 
2013-06-09 05:18:48 PM

puppetmaster745: glmorrs1: jehovahs witness protection: Sid_6.7: Note: the more dangerous it is, the more likely we'll notice it sooner. Thus, while an impact would have been bad, it probably would not have been too bad.

If by "small truck", let's go on the like high end for that, about 10 meters.

Per Wikipedia one those airbursts in the atmosphere about every 10 years. Yet how many have we heard of? Can you name any? The Chelyabinsk meteor was roughly 20 meters, and hit a populated area, and while it did quite a bit of damage, it was hardly "catastrophic" in a general sense.

Most will airburst over the ocean, about 72% of the surface of the planet. Add Antarctica, which is about 9% IIRC, and that's about 4/5 of them exploding in the skies above places no one is likely to notice or care.

Not much of a threat, but by all means preppers, keep helping the economy while building caches for me to raid just in case.

My "cache" consists of one case of MREs, water, flashlights and a camping stove. Been screwed by hurricanes before.

Then you're not really a "prepper". You're just prepared.

Also, this is why we shouldn't be cutting funding to NASA.

What is the set number of days you can live without outside help before you go from "prepared" to "prepper"?


If you have emergency rations for your dog, you're prepared.

If you have your dog for emergency rations, you're a prepper.

/stolen from the interwebs
 
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