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(YouTube)   Swingle Singers surprise unsuspecting subway sojourners, sing super-spy song "Soul Bossa Nova"   (youtube.com) divider line 26
    More: Amusing, Soul Bossa Nova, Metro, bossa nova, flash mobs  
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2492 clicks; posted to Video » on 07 Jun 2013 at 5:26 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



26 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

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2013-06-07 03:00:30 PM  
My definition is this.
 
2013-06-07 03:59:14 PM  

Thwartme: My definition is this.


So Boombastic of you
 
2013-06-07 05:40:51 PM  
Excellent! Brought goosebumps to my arms! And, unlike how Improv Everywhere eventually became old hat (sorry to say), these guys actually played it off well!

/actual smile upon my face; and man I needed one today!   :)
 
2013-06-07 06:09:14 PM  
Uploaded on Nov 2, 2010
At least it wasn't some of their Christian Music crap.

Is subby trying to promote their ongoing pledge drive and had to dig this far back for something without a "message".
 
2013-06-07 06:20:33 PM  
That was cool. I enjoyed it.
 
2013-06-07 06:57:51 PM  

HairBolus: Uploaded on Nov 2, 2010
At least it wasn't some of their Christian Music crap.

Is subby trying to promote their ongoing pledge drive and had to dig this far back for something without a "message".


Hey, Herr Killjoy, just let this one ride as being "fun".  Unless, of course, you think it'd have been better had they had a Jewish, Muslim, Indian, whatever backround sans message?
 
2013-06-07 07:00:09 PM  
http://youtu.be/AF-KagTq7qY
Been done before and much better.  You're welcome.
 
2013-06-07 07:06:26 PM  

Thresher: http://youtu.be/AF-KagTq7qY
Been done before and much better.  You're welcome.


You know how I know you hate white people?
 
2013-06-07 07:42:24 PM  
Maybe its corny, but I just love watching dour big city commuters pulled out of their shells like this.
 
2013-06-07 08:05:02 PM  
I saw this video a couple days ago in the sidebar when I was watching their version of "Libertango" (also very good). The headline popped into my head this afternoon.

I didn't mean for this to be a vehicle for their pledge drive, but I suppose it wouldn't be so bad if it helped them in that way.
 
2013-06-07 09:26:45 PM  

joseelsegundo: I saw this video a couple days ago in the sidebar when I was watching their version of "Libertango" (also very good). The headline popped into my head this afternoon.

I didn't mean for this to be a vehicle for their pledge drive, but I suppose it wouldn't be so bad if it helped them in that way.


There's no need for you to apologize. That was thoroughly enjoyable to watch. :-)
 
2013-06-07 10:21:18 PM  
 
2013-06-07 10:53:42 PM  
Thwartme

My definition is this.

_hat _ou did the_e, I _aw it.
 
2013-06-07 11:54:14 PM  
nice find subby!!!

<CSB>

I first heard the Swingle Singers on Music Choice (on my cable). Every Sunday evening from 8 to 9 PM CST the Light Classical channel plays some rather unusual music, including the Swingle Singers and the Nuclear Whales Saxophone Orchestra, among many others.

</CSB>
 
2013-06-07 11:57:58 PM  
Things like this are so awesome. I love living in London. This reminds of this time I was travelling on the tube a few Christmases ago...

In my evening commute from school to home, or perhaps I was returning from visting friends, I waited on the Bakerloo line platform for the next train like all the other regular shmoes. Ho hum.

As the train approached, I noticed some people holding instruments in the front car, and thinking that there was something cool about to happen, I rushed to the front as a few other folks did.

When the doors opened, we found a fully set up string quartet sitting in an almost empty car. I don't know the name of the piece they played, but it brought me to tears as we sped along underneath the London hustle and bustle, listening only to the high pitched woosh of the tunnels, and the beauty of sound that lay before us. It was so impromptu and absurd, and yet beautiful and life affirming.

They weren't busking or hoping for money, they did it for the music and the joy.  And they only played for maybe five minutes or so, about 3 stops before the carriage got packed full of busy, important people with places to be and things to do, but it was magical, and I'll never forget it.
 
2013-06-08 12:58:19 AM  

Thresher: http://youtu.be/AF-KagTq7qY
Been done before and much better.  You're welcome.


That blew goats compared to the Soul Bossa Nova.
 
2013-06-08 03:07:50 AM  
Every time I see a singer who has that "spastic eyebrow twitch and psychotic smile whilst looking around at the other people singing" routine, I want to choke the shiat out of them.  It's the vocal performance equivalent of guitarists that scrunch their face in excruciating pain and fake a seizure whenever they happen to pluck a high note.  There's no excuse for it, and it's amateurish.
 
2013-06-08 07:54:47 AM  
Dear 'muricans,

THIS is how you enjoy a spontaneous public live performance. Put your frigging cellphone down and enjoy the moment.

Signed,

The world.
 
2013-06-08 08:12:03 AM  

fatbear: Dear 'muricans,

THIS is how you enjoy a spontaneous public live performance. Put your frigging cellphone down and enjoy the moment.

Signed,

The world.


Except for all the people that had cellphones out, you trolltastic twit.
 
2013-06-08 09:08:04 AM  

lewismarktwo: fatbear: Dear 'muricans,

THIS is how you enjoy a spontaneous public live performance. Put your frigging cellphone down and enjoy the moment.

Signed,

The world.

Except for all the people that had cellphones out, you trolltastic twit.


Two. Also notice how they're holding them horizontally so their videos don't suck.

akimagery.com
 
2013-06-08 10:53:56 AM  

HotWingAgenda: Every time I see a singer who has that "spastic eyebrow twitch and psychotic smile whilst looking around at the other people singing" routine, I want to choke the shiat out of them.  It's the vocal performance equivalent of guitarists that scrunch their face in excruciating pain and fake a seizure whenever they happen to pluck a high note.  There's no excuse for it, and it's amateurish.


No, it is one way to fake "sincerity". The audience for Christian music demands that the performers be painfully sincere or possessed by the Holy Spirit.
 
2013-06-08 11:09:32 AM  
The Swingle singers are a Christian group?  <CITATION NEEDED>

My perusal of their website, their MySpace and Facebook pages show not one jot of Christianity beyond the fact that they have performed some Christmas songs.

They merge classical and jazz with some pop.  And have been doing so since 1962 (several incarnations of the group...)

/your claim confuses me
//is it a meme I'm not getting?
///or are you simply and utterly wrong?
 
2013-06-08 02:12:10 PM  
Well that made me smile =)
 
2013-06-08 05:12:59 PM  

HotWingAgenda: Every time I see a singer who has that "spastic eyebrow twitch and psychotic smile whilst looking around at the other people singing" routine, I want to choke the shiat out of them.  It's the vocal performance equivalent of guitarists that scrunch their face in excruciating pain and fake a seizure whenever they happen to pluck a high note.  There's no excuse for it, and it's amateurish.


As an actual musician, I'm getting a kick.  Here's what's behind the twitches and smiles (although I'll admit the same may not be the case for rock guitarists who might use these mannerisms for theatrical effect):  It's called "emotion" or "really getting into what you're doing". Those glitches and smiles are, typically, "for real". I play clarinet and sax and I'll be the first to tell you that most of the time when performing you aren't actively aware of those twitches and whatnot. When on bass clarinet, I discovered long ago that my own "twitches" can look forced but only noticed when I saw my first recorded performance. And, yeah, there might be some theatrics involved (Kenny G is guilty on this, I think, and most rock acts incorporate such stuff into their performances because, well, their schtick tends to be more theater than anything) but by and large I can tell you most of those "twitches" come about because of how you are feeling at the time. It's a combination of "having fun", "sheer elation" but, mostly, the music taking over and your body is simply reacting in a purely natural manner.
 
2013-06-08 07:10:13 PM  

MelGoesOnTour: HotWingAgenda: Every time I see a singer who has that "spastic eyebrow twitch and psychotic smile whilst looking around at the other people singing" routine, I want to choke the shiat out of them.  It's the vocal performance equivalent of guitarists that scrunch their face in excruciating pain and fake a seizure whenever they happen to pluck a high note.  There's no excuse for it, and it's amateurish.

As an actual musician, I'm getting a kick.  Here's what's behind the twitches and smiles (although I'll admit the same may not be the case for rock guitarists who might use these mannerisms for theatrical effect):  It's called "emotion" or "really getting into what you're doing". Those glitches and smiles are, typically, "for real". I play clarinet and sax and I'll be the first to tell you that most of the time when performing you aren't actively aware of those twitches and whatnot. When on bass clarinet, I discovered long ago that my own "twitches" can look forced but only noticed when I saw my first recorded performance. And, yeah, there might be some theatrics involved (Kenny G is guilty on this, I think, and most rock acts incorporate such stuff into their performances because, well, their schtick tends to be more theater than anything) but by and large I can tell you most of those "twitches" come about because of how you are feeling at the time. It's a combination of "having fun", "sheer elation" but, mostly, the music taking over and your body is simply reacting in a purely natural manner.


I agree.  The missus and I saw a performance the other night that had a couple of sax solos.  The soloist was absolutely emotionless.  Technically was fine but the stand still and barely move part sucked the life out of the performance.  Might as well just listen to the album.
 
2013-06-08 07:49:33 PM  

relaxitsjustme: MelGoesOnTour: HotWingAgenda: Every time I see a singer who has that "spastic eyebrow twitch and psychotic smile whilst looking around at the other people singing" routine, I want to choke the shiat out of them.  It's the vocal performance equivalent of guitarists that scrunch their face in excruciating pain and fake a seizure whenever they happen to pluck a high note.  There's no excuse for it, and it's amateurish.

As an actual musician, I'm getting a kick.  Here's what's behind the twitches and smiles (although I'll admit the same may not be the case for rock guitarists who might use these mannerisms for theatrical effect):  It's called "emotion" or "really getting into what you're doing". Those glitches and smiles are, typically, "for real". I play clarinet and sax and I'll be the first to tell you that most of the time when performing you aren't actively aware of those twitches and whatnot. When on bass clarinet, I discovered long ago that my own "twitches" can look forced but only noticed when I saw my first recorded performance. And, yeah, there might be some theatrics involved (Kenny G is guilty on this, I think, and most rock acts incorporate such stuff into their performances because, well, their schtick tends to be more theater than anything) but by and large I can tell you most of those "twitches" come about because of how you are feeling at the time. It's a combination of "having fun", "sheer elation" but, mostly, the music taking over and your body is simply reacting in a purely natural manner.

I agree.  The missus and I saw a performance the other night that had a couple of sax solos.  The soloist was absolutely emotionless.  Technically was fine but the stand still and barely move part sucked the life out of the performance.  Might as well just listen to the album.


I've seen the same sort of emotionless "horn players" and, you're right, they kind of put a wet blanket on things. I like the player who moves and let's his horn and music really and honestly (you can tell) take over his body. It's often not so much "performance" as it is "body/soul/music" just melding. It's hard to define, but you'll know, somehow, when it gel's and happens.  It's always hoped, of course, that the audience is "in tune" and not just looking for a circus. An emotionless  person is just going through the motions.
 
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