Do you have adblock enabled?
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Some Food Nut)   Fark Food Thread: Let's talk about the little things. Bake your own bread? Add to a salad? Make your own granola? What ways do you incorporate seeds and nuts into your cooking? Difficulty: not the seed from.. Oh, forget it. Jokes to the right:   (backwoodshome.com) divider line 227
    More: Interesting  
•       •       •

1630 clicks; posted to Main » on 07 Jun 2013 at 5:00 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



227 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-06-07 07:53:35 PM  

DGS: I've taken a stab lately and started making my own granola. I love the stuff and found it just so expensive to get in a store over and over. This way I also get to incorporate the things I want instead of 'well, this is good enough'.

I built my recipe off of this, but found it had a bit too much oat and not enough of the sweet binding mixture, so a lot was left dry. YMMV.

This was my revision when I worked on it. Pecans, Walnuts, and Almonds are incorporated, along with golden raisins and cherry-infused cranberry (Craisins). Turned out to be quite a hit with wifey and coworkers. It didn't last long.

[i.imgur.com image 764x1024]


I love making my granola as well. It's cheaper, and it has a lot less sugar and fat. I like to use unsweetened coconut, cashews, and cranberries. I use just enough honey to bind it and keep it moist, since I don't like my granola too sweet.
 
2013-06-07 08:00:20 PM  

Omahawg: cucumber sauce

1 large cuke, skinned, seeded, and diced fine
1 diced head garlic
1 cup plain yogurt
1 teaspoon dill weed
1/2 teaspoon garlic salt
pepper to taste, lemon pepper even better

great on salmon patties


one clove, dumbass
you can add some crushed pistachios too, if you'd like
 
2013-06-07 08:09:47 PM  

Maul555: KarmicDisaster: Maul555: I hate nuts in anything...  I will eat nuts by themselves sometimes, but if you put it in my brownie, pie, salad, or any other damn thing except peanut butter, I will farking kill stink-eye you!!!

Fine. I'm farkieing you as "hates nuts".

GOOD!


Be that way heh.
 
2013-06-07 08:15:34 PM  

ahab: And since this will be green later, here's why beer can chicken isn't as good as you think it is.


That made sense until I read:
"Let's say that you use a really high alcohol, dark, flavorful beer like Guinness Stout."

Guinness is not high alcohol.  Makes me wonder if he got the rest of his stuff straight.
 
2013-06-07 08:23:19 PM  

thornhill: I add ground flax seed to everything from homemade pizza dough to fruit smoothies.


It's a breakfast thing for me.

I add it to my oatmeal or mix it into one of my favorite breakfasts -- it's sort of a deconstructed smoothie:  fresh fruit, nuts, plain yogurt and flaxseed, topped with a little honey or agave syrup.
 
2013-06-07 08:24:54 PM  

ZeroCorpse: Oh, and to drink: Milk & Pepsi.

Honestly, you people who haven't had it are missing out.


There's a Yogurt Pepsi that's available in Japan. You'd probably like it.
 
2013-06-07 08:34:38 PM  

Aarontology: Or anytime, really. the folding part is the hardest, just because the dough can tear so easily.


Pizza dough tearing?  You need to let it rest, covered with a towel, for 5-15 minutes.  Good pizza dough should have enough gluten to stretch a lot (like, for example, into a paper-thin pizza crust).  If it's tearing on these folds, the gluten needs to relax.

Also, if you're going to make your own salad dressing regularly, sacrifice a squeeze bottle to it.

www.seriouseats.com
 
2013-06-07 08:38:02 PM  

Buzzerguy: Also, if you're going to make your own salad dressing regularly, sacrifice a squeeze bottle to it.


I really like that idea.  I always make my own salad dressing.  This'll make it much easier.  Thanks!
 
2013-06-07 08:47:14 PM  
As opposed to cooking with this kind of seed.
 
2013-06-07 09:00:17 PM  
Huh huh huh...seed...huh huh
 
2013-06-07 09:04:47 PM  
I love baking my own bread. 4 cups of unbleached all-purpose flour, a packet of yeast (with 2 cups warm water and a tablespoon of sugar), 2 teaspoons kosher salt. Mix it all up, let it rise, stir in seasonings of your choice, let it rise again, then bake it at 375F for about 40 minutes. It's simply and tasty.

I also like making pralines.
 
2013-06-07 09:07:45 PM  

eraser8: thornhill: I add ground flax seed to everything from homemade pizza dough to fruit smoothies.

It's a breakfast thing for me.

I add it to my oatmeal or mix it into one of my favorite breakfasts -- it's sort of a deconstructed smoothie:  fresh fruit, nuts, plain yogurt and flaxseed, topped with a little honey or agave syrup.


Are you grinding it? Apparently you don't get any of the health benefits if eaten without grinding.
 
2013-06-07 09:21:16 PM  

thornhill: eraser8: thornhill: I add ground flax seed to everything from homemade pizza dough to fruit smoothies.

It's a breakfast thing for me.

I add it to my oatmeal or mix it into one of my favorite breakfasts -- it's sort of a deconstructed smoothie:  fresh fruit, nuts, plain yogurt and flaxseed, topped with a little honey or agave syrup.

Are you grinding it? Apparently you don't get any of the health benefits if eaten without grinding.


Yeah.  I grind it at home from whole seed instead of buying flaxseed powder.  I use a coffee grinder.

Should I be buying the powder instead of the seeds?
 
2013-06-07 09:26:01 PM  

eraser8: thornhill: eraser8: thornhill: I add ground flax seed to everything from homemade pizza dough to fruit smoothies.

It's a breakfast thing for me.

I add it to my oatmeal or mix it into one of my favorite breakfasts -- it's sort of a deconstructed smoothie:  fresh fruit, nuts, plain yogurt and flaxseed, topped with a little honey or agave syrup.

Are you grinding it? Apparently you don't get any of the health benefits if eaten without grinding.

Yeah.  I grind it at home from whole seed instead of buying flaxseed powder.  I use a coffee grinder.

Should I be buying the powder instead of the seeds?


Nah, paying someone else to grind it for you is a waste of money.

Just wanted to check you were grinding -- it's a common mistake with flax seeds.
 
2013-06-07 09:39:46 PM  

flucto: bim1154: Brine your chicken/turkey and you'll be hard pressed to dry it out.

poach it before you roast it and you'll be even happier. Don't let the water get above about 140.


Hmmm, if you poached it before you roasted your turkey would it be worthwhile money-wise to add herbs, spices and or broth?

/can't poach a whole turkey, but maybe a chicken or turkey breast
 
2013-06-07 09:48:00 PM  

downstairs: When we make pesto, we often use pistachios rather than the traditional pine nuts.  Gives it a slightly different flavor.


I found a pistachio pesto from Marc Vetri's cookbook and its awesome. Just pistachio and extra virgin olive oil with a bit of salt.

That paired with his mortadella ravioli is just awesome.
 
2013-06-07 10:09:32 PM  

Egoy3k: Yeah 'beer can' chicken has nothing on my, 'shove a big onion (in quarters) some garlic and some salt and pepper in the cavity, rub the skin with olive oil and season with thyme, rosemary and salt then roast it at high temperature until it's done' chicken.

/well it's easier to say...


Recall that chicken skin is waterproof...so none of that herby goodness on the skin ever gets into the meat. So take some of that herby oil--herby butter aint bad either--and put it under the skin. Then throw a sprig of that rosemary into the cavity.

Somehow game hens take the herb flavor even better than chicken.

You will like it.
 
2013-06-07 11:05:24 PM  

seelorq: Egoy3k: Yeah 'beer can' chicken has nothing on my, 'shove a big onion (in quarters) some garlic and some salt and pepper in the cavity, rub the skin with olive oil and season with thyme, rosemary and salt then roast it at high temperature until it's done' chicken.

/well it's easier to say...

Recall that chicken skin is waterproof...so none of that herby goodness on the skin ever gets into the meat. So take some of that herby oil--herby butter aint bad either--and put it under the skin. Then throw a sprig of that rosemary into the cavity.

Somehow game hens take the herb flavor even better than chicken.

You will like it.


I should know this but I did not, it's obvious when you think of it but thanks for the tip.

If I use butter I usually do put it under the skin, Maybe next time I'm mix the seasoning into the butter and get it under the skin.
 
2013-06-08 12:10:20 AM  
You have to be a pretty goddamned awful cook to dry out a chicken at 165.
 
2013-06-08 12:10:46 AM  

Coastalgrl: Are the other Fark Food threads archived somewhere? There were some awesome recipes in some of them. I only saved a handful.

/in food rut.
//so bored.


Well, since there's no other responses to this post I will be your huckleberry!  There's no reason you can't add some nuts to this recipe if they are chopped.  Preferably pine nuts, finely chopped if you can afford them.  Substitute peanuts or pistachio nuts if you're feeling not so flush with cash.  I'd buy the salted in the shell (they're probably cheaper that way, and don't add too many you can always add more.) and eliminate any salt from the recipe below until tasting time.

I did a Pork green Chile that worked out pretty good last weekend.  It can be a stew, soup or a sauce depending on how you do it.  Let's see if I can remember.  I made the whole thing in a 6 quart dutch oven.  One pot for the win!
Here you go:

Pork stew meat.  Not sure about the weight, but it was sliced up into chunks and filled one of those pink foam things they use that was a really big size, about 8x12".  Maybe 3-4 lb?  So it was a jumbo package.  I got it in the mark down area for $5.90  You can cut down the really big hunks (like I did) or dice everything to smaller pieces if you don't like big hunks in your stew/soup/sauce.
Green chile.  My local grocery has clear plastic bag packaged peeled?/frozen/diced green chile (30oz) like this:   http://www.selectnewmexico.com/products/  I got the hot one #69001, but you might want to go medium or mild.  Don't worry if there are seeds, the chile isn't really all that hot.  If you can only get canned green chile, then you might need more than 30oz.  Drain them lightly and dice them small.  Reserve the liquid, you can always add it back in instead of water to increase the chile flavor.  Try to get whole roasted ones in the can if you do this.  This turns out fairly hot, in fact it was so hot I had to add two diced potatoes for my tongue.
Onions.  I used like 3 medium yellow onions medium dice.
Garlic.  I used a couple TBSP jarred minced or chopped.
Tomatoes.  I used a one 14.5oz can of diced.  You can use the ones with oregano or mexican blend if you like.  I also used 6 fresh medium roma/plum tomatoes diced medium.
Peppers.  I used one large jalapeno diced very fine.  You could go for one or more Serrano if you want flames out of your behind or just bell pepper/tomatillo if you want it mild.
Broth.  I thought I had chicken broth at home, so I didn't get any.  I got home and there was none, so I thought I'd use chicken base.  Those small jars are a bitach.  I had one that was opened quite a while ago in the fridge, and I couldn't get the top off again to use more.  So I chucked it and turned to the chicken boullion cubes from Knorr.  I used like 3 large ones and about 6 cups of water.  You can add more water later, but you need to leave room for the meat, potatoes, tomatoes, and green chile.
Herbs and spices.  I added dried oregano (mexican if you have it, you can get it at Wal-Mart in a little celophane package with a red paper topper around here but I just used regular) like a palm-full maybe 2TBSP, cumin maybe 1TBSP, chile powder 1TBSP, some cayenne pepper too (to your heat level, you can add this after you taste for heat, while it's simmer down now), whatever else you might have in your spice cabinet that is vaguely mexican such as fajita seasoning, parsley-dried, etc.  I had a couple carrots, so I quarted them and then sliced and added after the garlic (optional).

Method:  I salted and floured (the more flour you use here, the thicker the stew/soup/sauce will be.  If you're going for a sauce, flour very lightly.  If a stew, you can add 50% more.  Remember, you can always make a little roux or a slurry and add it later if it's too thin.  Once your flour and salt are on,  pat the mixture into the meat on the pink foam flat of pork goodness.  I put some regular vegetable oil in the pot and heated it up until it was ready.  Then I browned off half the pork.  Make sure your heat is low or medium-low, do not burn!  You want lightly brown bits in the pan, not any black!  I removed it from the pot to the lid lined with a paper towel.  Add a bit more oil and brown off the 2nd half of pork, remove to the lid of the pan (do not burn it!).  You are going to add the onions, if needed add more oil and heat it up.  Add the onions, cook for about 2-3 minutes and then add the garlic, jalapeno and/or other peppers.  Cook about 2 minutes, still on low or med-low.  Your fond shouldn't be black!  Light brown is what you want, kind of floury looking.
Ok, go ahead and add the beautiful pork back in (and any drippings) and immediately add some water (maybe leave it 2-3 inches below the top of the dutch oven/pot) and the boullion cubes.  Stir this up a bit, scrape up the fond off the bottom with a wooden flat spoony thing then add the can of tomatoes, and the herbs and spices.  Bring to light boil and reduce to low simmer.  Stir it once in a while.
Let's have a beer, no 2 beers and think about this.  Did you remember to stir it?  You better do that now.  Is there anything else you want to put in?  Is it too thin?  If so, add a bit of roux or a bit of corn starch slurry.  Or even a flour/water slurry.  Is it too thick?  If so, add more water.  Ok! well let's go see how it's doing and give it a taste.  Does it need salt or spices?  Add them now.  Is it hot enough for you?  If not add more cayenne, jalapeno or serrano.  Is it too hot?  Well, if you cube up some potatoes and add them now it will make it a bunch less hot later.  If it's just right, and you want to eat it as a sauce I'd go ahead and leave the potatoes out.  If you want to have it as a stew, add the potatoes and you can always add more heat later.
Add more water to fill the pot, and simmer-low semi-covered for about an hour or so to make sure the potatoes and pork are cooked and tender!
 
2013-06-08 01:28:51 AM  
Salad nuts. Love 'em.
 
2013-06-08 02:12:56 AM  
Nuts are too expensive, I use dehydrated ground beef.
 
2013-06-08 07:31:17 AM  

ski9600: /can't poach a whole turkey, but maybe a chicken or turkey breast


I poach my whole turkey every year at thanksgiving but it's not easy. Yes, worth it to put in herbs, can't use that much stock though. I do use some.

Get the bird up to 140 in 140 degree water then roast.
 
2013-06-08 08:51:23 AM  
Poppy seeds.

healthykitchens.com
 
2013-06-08 10:56:26 AM  
deez nuts
 
2013-06-08 11:18:36 AM  

Mock26: And no peanut bits in my peanut butter cookies!


Heresy.
 
2013-06-08 05:59:13 PM  
Toasted walnuts in pasta with some olive oil and parmesan.  Doing this with ravioli and some slices of tart apple is one of my favorite fast fall meals...mmmmm
 
Displayed 27 of 227 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report