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(Some Food Nut)   Fark Food Thread: Let's talk about the little things. Bake your own bread? Add to a salad? Make your own granola? What ways do you incorporate seeds and nuts into your cooking? Difficulty: not the seed from.. Oh, forget it. Jokes to the right:   (backwoodshome.com) divider line 227
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1633 clicks; posted to Main » on 07 Jun 2013 at 5:00 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-06-07 09:56:04 AM  

CatherineM: That's different. Fruit salad implies fruit only.

Green salads, chicken salad, tuna salad.. keep your sweet fruit the hell out..


I do agree with this, BUT, pivazena made a green salad once with feta and dried cranberries that was awesome.... so, now I don't know what to think.
 
2013-06-07 09:57:56 AM  

CatherineM: Shostie: spcMike: Also, CatherineM is wrong when she says strawberries don't go in salads.

[fun4friends.net image 602x403]

That's different. Fruit salad implies fruit only.

Green salads, chicken salad, tuna salad.. keep your sweet fruit the hell out..


Green salad + strawberries + walnuts.
Green salad + Asian pear + blue cheese.
Chicken or tuna salad + grapes.
 
2013-06-07 09:58:39 AM  
I hate grapes and nuts in chicken salad.  You're just trying to get me to ignore how little chicken you put in it.
 
2013-06-07 10:00:20 AM  

kwame: I hate grapes and nuts in chicken salad.  You're just trying to get me to ignore how little chicken you put in it.


weeklyguiltypleasure.files.wordpress.com
Well excuse me for trying to help you live a better life.
 
2013-06-07 10:00:31 AM  

CapeFearCadaver: CatherineM: That's different. Fruit salad implies fruit only.

Green salads, chicken salad, tuna salad.. keep your sweet fruit the hell out..

I do agree with this, BUT, pivazena made a green salad once with feta and dried cranberries that was awesome.... so, now I don't know what to think.


Oh, it also had pecans. It was delish!
 
2013-06-07 10:02:55 AM  

CapeFearCadaver: I do agree with this, BUT, pivazena made a green salad once with feta and dried cranberries that was awesome.... so, now I don't know what to think.


Oh shoot yes.  We often put raisins  (or ideally currants) in salad.  And fresh strawberries and blueberries when in season.

At my house, you need:
greens
stank cheese
cashews
fruit
onions
homemade dressing

Although I don't have enough good things to say about Kroger's Private Selection Orange Poppy Dressing.  That stuff is great.
 
2013-06-07 10:12:18 AM  

DGS: dletter: kwame: DGS: The times I've bought canned smoked almonds I've been disappointed, so I don't bother with that anymore.

These are awesome.

[www.cvs.com image 169x224]

This is an example of a good point.... just about anything in a tin/aluminum can for too long doesn't taste as good as even sitting just as long in any other packaging.  Tuna is a really good one for this... those packets that have been available the past 5-10 years taste much better than tuna from a can.

You know, that's a fair point indeed. I should give them another shot.


Yeah... IMO, I think the taste of the metal from the can leeches into the product, and makes that "funky" taste you talked about in the other post with the smoked nuts.   With my tuna example though, I wouldn't be surprised if some people are so used to it though that they "prefer" the taste of canned tuna vs. pouched, just because it was all they had all their life.
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2013-06-07 10:22:27 AM  

dletter: DGS: dletter: kwame: DGS: The times I've bought canned smoked almonds I've been disappointed, so I don't bother with that anymore.

These are awesome.

[www.cvs.com image 169x224]

This is an example of a good point.... just about anything in a tin/aluminum can for too long doesn't taste as good as even sitting just as long in any other packaging.  Tuna is a really good one for this... those packets that have been available the past 5-10 years taste much better than tuna from a can.

You know, that's a fair point indeed. I should give them another shot.

Yeah... IMO, I think the taste of the metal from the can leeches into the product, and makes that "funky" taste you talked about in the other post with the smoked nuts.   With my tuna example though, I wouldn't be surprised if some people are so used to it though that they "prefer" the taste of canned tuna vs. pouched, just because it was all they had all their life.


That very well could be. I make myself a spicy tuna sandwich every few weeks, and do still use a can. I'm going to get a pouch when these last few cans are out and try it to see the difference. It's disturbingly obvious how likely the odds are that the difference will be noticable, but I've just not given that thought before.

I thought they coated a lot of these steel cans with plastic or something, similar to how they do so with the cans for Coke and the like.
 
2013-06-07 10:27:35 AM  
Pistachios make for a nice crust for soft cheeses like chevre. Crush them up to a medium fine state, then sear for a moment on a flat top, or in a pan, flip, and then use them to top a salad, maybe with some roasted beets. I like to use a golden beets, and maybe some roasted sweet potato with salads, for a contrast in flavors and textures. Candy cane beets also make for nice touch, for the color and flavor.

Parmesan makes for great croutons. In a pan, melt mounds of Parmesan to a disk or on a silpat or other non-stick surface in the oven, and cool, for a nice little flat of cheesy goodness, or drape over an upended muffin tin, and you can make wee bowls of hardened cheese when they cool, and you can fill it with bacon, fruit, microgreens, and top however you like.

I like to use smoked plum tomatoes for salads as well, or reserve them for sauces or soups, either way, you have smoky goodness.

Found some great chocolate and vanilla tortillas a while back, and toasted up, they make for great dessert nachos. Not terrible sweet, but enough chocolate and vanilla flavor, and cut and toasted, they make for a great presentation for a variation on a sundae. Ice cream or fruit, with vanilla cream, chocolate sauce, caramel all drizzled willy-nilly, and you've got crisp chips, sweetness, and a fun way to make a turn on the usual dessert.

I am not a fan of blue cheese for the most part--the smelling like feet sort of puts me off. Westfield Farms makes a Hubbardston Blue chevre that is amazing. Mild, smooth, and with great flavor and texture. Perfect for summer salads, and a great accompaniment for greens, beets, maybe use fried papadums to make a stacked salad--layer greens, papadum or cheese crouton, top with more greens, maybe some slices of roasted beets, cheese, and more.

If you like doing cheese croutons with Parmesan, you might think about adding a bit of chili or curry to the cheese before melting it on your flattop or in the oven, for a bit of spin on the flavor, and color. Even a bit of paprika, just for color and a bit of flavor to the mix.

Accents? You might try infused oils. Paprika, chili, curry, basil, scallion, even just parsley can give oils a bit of color and perk, and a few swirls make for great color on plates, or even to the surface of soups, that you can keep for some time, and perk up tired presentation.

Puff pastry doughs can make for a nice variation for a crouton. Cut into small triangles, brush with herbed oil, and a dusting of Parmesan, and bake up, and you've got a triangle of savoriness that will go well on top of soups, to stack with greens to make a nice tall salad, or just a simple accent to a dish that has flavor, as well as a neat shape. You can even make an open faced variation of Spanikopita, without the phyllo. Very different in texture to be sure--phyllo and puff pastry are very different products, but for a quick appetizer, you can do a fun variation that will be easy to make, and look amazing, and taste great.

Thin strips of carrot or parsnip fry up nice, and reserve the fried strips, and you've got a nice crisp topping to pop onto salad or even dinner presentation. Strips of toasted prosciutto, all hard and firm also make for great accents as well.

I like to take pears, especially the small ones, and poach them in wine and honey, and maybe a bit of ginger. Then, when the pears are nice and tender, set them aside to cool, and reduce the poaching liquid down a bit more to make syrup to drizzle over the top of the pears. Makes for a nice combination for salads, soft cheeses, and fresh greens. I like to slice the pears almost all the way through, at an angle, so that the pear falls open a bit, and is easy to slice and the syrup then drips into the slices to coat the fruit better.

Those are just off the top of my head. Often it is just the little touches that help make a dish stand out and make them special.
 
2013-06-07 10:29:30 AM  

DGS: I thought they coated a lot of these steel cans with plastic or something, similar to how they do so with the cans for Coke and the like.


Yup, it's BPA.  An endocrine disruptor.  Good times!
 
2013-06-07 10:32:34 AM  
I brew my own beer. After a bottle of the goodness everything tastes better.
 
2013-06-07 11:02:56 AM  

DGS: I thought they coated a lot of these steel cans with plastic or something, similar to how they do so with the cans for Coke and the like.


Which is yet another reason why beer can chicken is actually a bad idea.
 
2013-06-07 11:46:39 AM  

Theaetetus: weeklyguiltypleasure.files.wordpress.com


i970.photobucket.com
NEED A DISPENSAH HERE!
 
2013-06-07 11:52:45 AM  
 
2013-06-07 12:09:45 PM  

ahab: And since this will be green later, here's why beer can chicken isn't as good as you think it is.


Pretty damn much. There's a reason that professional kitchens don't shove beer cans into birds...
 
2013-06-07 12:22:54 PM  

hubiestubert: ahab: And since this will be green later, here's why beer can chicken isn't as good as you think it is.

Pretty damn much. There's a reason that professional kitchens don't shove beer cans into birds...


It's just as easy to fill the cavity up with whatever herbs/fruit then beer you want then roast. Tastes much better, too
 
2013-06-07 12:27:39 PM  

CapeFearCadaver: hubiestubert: ahab: And since this will be green later, here's why beer can chicken isn't as good as you think it is.

Pretty damn much. There's a reason that professional kitchens don't shove beer cans into birds...

It's just as easy to fill the cavity up with whatever herbs/fruit then beer you want then roast. Tastes much better, too


I like to do a stuffing with cheese and sausage grits, for turkey and for roasting birds, but that's me. There are a lot better ways to get flavor and joy out of a bird than putting plasticized cans in the cavity...
 
2013-06-07 12:32:55 PM  

hubiestubert: I like to do a stuffing with cheese and sausage grits, for turkey and for roasting birds, but that's me. There are a lot better ways to get flavor and joy out of a bird than putting plasticized cans in the cavity...


For a chicken, I'll do apple slices marinated in a nut brown ale like Newcastle and honey/maple syrup... stuff that in there, then fresh sprigs of rosemary and lemon slices. Salt/pepper the bird, baste with a butter/garlic/parsley mixture while roasting.

Turkeys, well, I only do those at Thanksgiving so it's my homemade stuffing. Of which I will never give that recipe to anyone, unless I have kids :)
 
2013-06-07 12:41:48 PM  
I'm looking forward to smoking a turkey sometime in the next month or two as really early prep for Thanksgiving.  Just got the smoker, so I need to put it through its paces.
 
2013-06-07 12:56:05 PM  

ahab: And since this will be green later, here's why beer can chicken isn't as good as you think it is.


FTA:  Chicken and turkey must be cooked to 165°F in order to kill salmonella.

I think I'll pass on his dried out well-done poultry, thank you.
 
2013-06-07 01:07:55 PM  

Theaetetus: ahab: And since this will be green later, here's why beer can chicken isn't as good as you think it is.

FTA:  Chicken and turkey must be cooked to 165°F in order to kill salmonella.

I think I'll pass on his dried out well-done poultry, thank you.


Um...what?  Most people don't want their poultry medium-rare, and most recommendations are 165 in the breast and 175 in the thigh.
 
2013-06-07 01:17:01 PM  

ahab: Theaetetus: ahab: And since this will be green later, here's why beer can chicken isn't as good as you think it is.

FTA:  Chicken and turkey must be cooked to 165°F in order to kill salmonella.

I think I'll pass on his dried out well-done poultry, thank you.

Um...what?  Most people don't want their poultry medium-rare, and most recommendations are 165 in the breast and 175 in the thigh.


Most people haven't had their poultry medium-rare, because they've heard the 165 myth over and over from those same "recommendations" which assume that people can't follow a compound direction like "reach temperature x; and then wait for time y":
www.seriouseats.com
Sure, your chicken is sterile if you cook it to 165 for five seconds. But it's also just as sterile if held at 155 for a minute. I find the breasts are juicier and more flavorful at 145.
 
2013-06-07 01:21:28 PM  

Theaetetus: Most people haven't had their poultry medium-rare, because they've heard the 165 myth over and over from those same "recommendations" which assume that people can't follow a compound direction like "reach temperature x; and then wait for time y":


Most cooking methods don't allow you to keep your food at that low of a temperature for that long of a time, hence the USDA recommendations.  Sous vide is a distinct exception to the rule.
 
2013-06-07 02:06:45 PM  

ahab: I'm looking forward to smoking a turkey sometime in the next month or two as really early prep for Thanksgiving.  Just got the smoker, so I need to put it through its paces.


I've got a large (5 lbs) pork loin roast and someone here gave me a great roasting recipe for it using my large turkey roaster; but, my neighbors have a smoker.... do you think I could do this on their smoker?

i.imgur.com

On a regular sized stove for reference of how huge it is.
 
2013-06-07 02:32:44 PM  

ahab: Theaetetus: Most people haven't had their poultry medium-rare, because they've heard the 165 myth over and over from those same "recommendations" which assume that people can't follow a compound direction like "reach temperature x; and then wait for time y":

Most cooking methods don't allow you to keep your food at that low of a temperature for that long of a time, hence the USDA recommendations.  Sous vide is a distinct exception to the rule.


I've had pretty cook experience with pan searing a pork loin with an embedded digital thermometer and moving it on and off heat once it was at temperature. It does go over the goal I was aiming at, but not by much, and not all the way up to the USDA recommended temp.
You could do the same thing with a spatchcock chicken on a grill.
 
2013-06-07 02:51:12 PM  

CapeFearCadaver: ahab: I'm looking forward to smoking a turkey sometime in the next month or two as really early prep for Thanksgiving.  Just got the smoker, so I need to put it through its paces.

I've got a large (5 lbs) pork loin roast and someone here gave me a great roasting recipe for it using my large turkey roaster; but, my neighbors have a smoker.... do you think I could do this on their smoker?

[i.imgur.com image 540x405]

On a regular sized stove for reference of how huge it is.


Yes, use this recipe.
 
2013-06-07 02:54:35 PM  

Theaetetus: pretty cook experience


pretty good experience, rather
 
2013-06-07 02:54:57 PM  

ahab: CapeFearCadaver: ahab: I'm looking forward to smoking a turkey sometime in the next month or two as really early prep for Thanksgiving.  Just got the smoker, so I need to put it through its paces.

I've got a large (5 lbs) pork loin roast and someone here gave me a great roasting recipe for it using my large turkey roaster; but, my neighbors have a smoker.... do you think I could do this on their smoker?

[i.imgur.com image 540x405]

On a regular sized stove for reference of how huge it is.

Yes, use this recipe.


Rock, thanks!
 
2013-06-07 03:13:30 PM  

CapeFearCadaver: ahab: CapeFearCadaver: ahab: I'm looking forward to smoking a turkey sometime in the next month or two as really early prep for Thanksgiving.  Just got the smoker, so I need to put it through its paces.

I've got a large (5 lbs) pork loin roast and someone here gave me a great roasting recipe for it using my large turkey roaster; but, my neighbors have a smoker.... do you think I could do this on their smoker?

[i.imgur.com image 540x405]

On a regular sized stove for reference of how huge it is.

Yes, use this recipe.

Rock, thanks!


I'm cooking a 7.5 pound butt this weekend, can't wait!  Different recipe/method, but butt is a different cut of meat than loin.
 
2013-06-07 03:24:35 PM  

ahab: I'm cooking a 7.5 pound butt this weekend, can't wait! Different recipe/method, but butt is a different cut of meat than loin.


My neighbor with the smoker did the butt about a month ago, they lived in Hawaii for a few years (hubby in Navy) so she did it the Hawaiian style pulled pork.... OMFG! So, so good.

We've been talking about pulling our money together with another set of neighbors and buying/smoking a really nice brisket. I think that shiat would complete me.
 
2013-06-07 04:12:00 PM  

CatherineM: Green salads, chicken salad, tuna salad.. keep your sweet fruit the hell out..


OMG, so much this. I've had chicken salad from Central Market that had apricots in it, that was pretty good, but pretty much every other time I've had salad with fruit in it, this is what I felt like.
 
2013-06-07 05:07:10 PM  
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-06-07 05:07:46 PM  
Almost any I make a stuffing with ricotta (cannelloni, squid, etc.), I use pine nuts.
 
2013-06-07 05:10:05 PM  
Leviticus 18:21 -וּמִֽזַּרְעֲךָ֥ לֹא־ תִתֵּ֖ן לְהַעֲבִ֣יר לַמֹּ֑לֶךְ - "don't offer your seed to Molech"
 
2013-06-07 05:10:50 PM  
My new favorite dressing for Asian Slaw

1 part ponzu
1 part garlic rice vinegar
1 part garlic flavored red wine vinegar

Chop up some ginger and garlic clove, put it all and a shaker and shake vigorously.  Sprinkle slaw with some roasted garlic sesame seeds.

The dressing comes out so tasty I've drank the leftover.
 
2013-06-07 05:12:55 PM  

Theaetetus: ahab: Theaetetus: ahab: And since this will be green later, here's why beer can chicken isn't as good as you think it is.

FTA:  Chicken and turkey must be cooked to 165°F in order to kill salmonella.

I think I'll pass on his dried out well-done poultry, thank you.

Um...what?  Most people don't want their poultry medium-rare, and most recommendations are 165 in the breast and 175 in the thigh.

Most people haven't had their poultry medium-rare, because they've heard the 165 myth over and over from those same "recommendations" which assume that people can't follow a compound direction like "reach temperature x; and then wait for time y":
[www.seriouseats.com image 500x366]
Sure, your chicken is sterile if you cook it to 165 for five seconds. But it's also just as sterile if held at 155 for a minute. I find the breasts are juicier and more flavorful at 145.


Brine your chicken/turkey and you'll be hard pressed to dry it out.
 
2013-06-07 05:14:42 PM  
Add a handful of cashews to your next smoothy. Makes a good thing wonderful. Not what you'd think. Just try it.
 
2013-06-07 05:15:21 PM  

bim1154: Brine your chicken/turkey and you'll be hard pressed to dry it out.


poach it before you roast it and you'll be even happier. Don't let the water get above about 140.
 
2013-06-07 05:17:31 PM  
Gonna make me some "cro-nuts" this weekend. like croissants , fried like doughnuts with a filling.
http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/eats/cronuts-sugar-bombs-sweet ne ss-article-1.1359260
 
2013-06-07 05:17:44 PM  
When we make pesto, we often use pistachios rather than the traditional pine nuts.  Gives it a slightly different flavor.
 
2013-06-07 05:18:03 PM  
Where nuts come from...

img837.imageshack.us
 
2013-06-07 05:18:57 PM  
Use Flax seeds as an egg substitute.

The soluble fiber in flax has a texture similar to egg when saturated and can be used as a binding agent in place of eggs in most baked goods. The linked recipe recommends mixing them before hand, but I've found that just adding the ground seeds and water is sufficient: they'll saturate on there own in the dough/batter.
 
2013-06-07 05:19:10 PM  

downstairs: When we make pesto, we often use pistachios rather than the traditional pine nuts.  Gives it a slightly different flavor.



Make sage pesto sometime - use walnuts.  Totally awesome.
 
2013-06-07 05:20:07 PM  
mountainside-diversified.com
 
2013-06-07 05:20:57 PM  
Are the other Fark Food threads archived somewhere? There were some awesome recipes in some of them. I only saved a handful.

/in food rut.
//so bored.
 
2013-06-07 05:26:29 PM  

FrancoFile: downstairs: When we make pesto, we often use pistachios rather than the traditional pine nuts.  Gives it a slightly different flavor.


Make sage pesto sometime - use walnuts.  Totally awesome.


Cool, I'll pass that on to Mrs. Downstairs.  She's actually the cook.  Hence, I'm not in these food threads unless we're talking about the best ways to make toast.  ;)
 
2013-06-07 05:27:10 PM  
Kyro: Testicles.  Test Tickles (fixed)
 
2013-06-07 05:27:23 PM  
img.photobucket.com
 
2013-06-07 05:27:34 PM  
If you can get raw, unshelled peanuts (can't find? try an asian supermarket)

1. heat oven/toaster oven to 350 Degree F
2. spread peanuts still in shell on a flat tray
3. let bake in oven for 20 minutes

-Eat while still warm: No salt or seasoning required

/ you can save the shells and spread over garden/under bushes as a mulch.
 
2013-06-07 05:30:49 PM  
Semen
 
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