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(Boston Herald)   Boston hospitals were prepared for bombing, but not for government response to bombing   (bostonherald.com) divider line 29
    More: Interesting, Tufts Medical Center, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, emergency medicines, emergency evacuation, lessons, Massachusetts General Hospital, hospitals, emergency rooms  
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9364 clicks; posted to Main » on 05 Jun 2013 at 11:03 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-06-05 09:39:59 AM  
Well, you learn, you adapt from there and refine it.
 
2013-06-05 09:54:32 AM  
I have to give MUCH kudos to the first responders, doctors, nurses and everyone else involved.  As horrible as it was, it could have been worse.  I'm not saying DON'T tell a soldier "Thank you for your service", but maybe also remember to tell that to firemen, doctors, etc.
 
2013-06-05 10:53:30 AM  
I have a friend who volunteered to work on marathon day at Mass General. She was thinking she was in for a day of sprained ankles and bloody nipples.
 
2013-06-05 11:11:40 AM  
"We had a hospital full of people who couldn't leave. We had a staff that had spent the night that couldn't leave, and the day staff that couldn't get into the hospital. That was a scenario we had never anticipated

When the government gets involved in common sense decisions, all bets are off. What a clusterfark.
 
2013-06-05 11:12:47 AM  
Improvise, Adapt, Overcome - United States Marines
Be Prepared - Boy Scouts of America
Always Wear Clean Underwear - Your Mom
 
2013-06-05 11:14:13 AM  
You just know there's probably dozens (hundreds?) of hospital staff that are still trying to get their paychecks worked out because they basically couldnt leave and ended up working something insane like 36 straight hours and the Kronos system freaked out...
 
2013-06-05 11:15:11 AM  
There was no lock-down. it was a request to stay inside. they cannot, yet, force a lock-down in the USA.   Even in school shootings or whatever, if yuo want to leave, they cannot detain you.  it is always a request masquerading as an order.   The most they can do is cordon off a specific crime scene while documenting evidence.
 
2013-06-05 11:18:10 AM  

nekom: I have to give MUCH kudos to the first responders, doctors, nurses and everyone else involved.  As horrible as it was, it could have been worse.  I'm not saying DON'T tell a soldier "Thank you for your service", but maybe also remember to tell that to firemen, doctors, etc.


it could have been better if there wasn't a lock-down
I think that was a serious violation of peoples rights and was not necessary
 
2013-06-05 11:27:03 AM  

Panatheist: nekom: I have to give MUCH kudos to the first responders, doctors, nurses and everyone else involved.  As horrible as it was, it could have been worse.  I'm not saying DON'T tell a soldier "Thank you for your service", but maybe also remember to tell that to firemen, doctors, etc.

it could have been better if there wasn't a lock-down
I think that was a serious violation of peoples rights and was not necessary


The fark do you know?  You weren't here that day.

Besides, it was a suggestion, not a mandate,
 
2013-06-05 11:27:58 AM  
London - lockdown the city when Bush comes to town.

Shanghai -- just put metal detectors at the floor of the hotel where the heads of China, Uzbekistan, Iran, Mongolia, Pakistan meet in the building. Tourists could still take the elevator to the top floor observation deck and eat in the food court in the building.
If the bombers hadn't been Caucasians, the authorities might have turned off the power and water to the city, too, and silenced TV, radio and phone service.
 
2013-06-05 11:33:08 AM  

BitwiseShift: London - lockdown the city when Bush comes to town.

Shanghai -- just put metal detectors at the floor of the hotel where the heads of China, Uzbekistan, Iran, Mongolia, Pakistan meet in the building. Tourists could still take the elevator to the top floor observation deck and eat in the food court in the building.
If the bombers hadn't been Caucasians, the authorities might have turned off the power and water to the city, too, and silenced TV, radio and phone service.


Thats not a fair comparison. The chinese value human live much less than the western world. they simply dont care.
 
2013-06-05 11:52:33 AM  
www.joeydevilla.com
 
2013-06-05 11:54:15 AM  

Mimic_Octopus: There was no lock-down



So the city of Boston was deserted the next day just on general principles?
 
2013-06-05 11:57:04 AM  

Fizpez: You just know there's probably dozens (hundreds?) of hospital staff that are still trying to get their paychecks worked out because they basically couldnt leave and ended up working something insane like 36 straight hours and the Kronos system freaked out...


when the cops and FBI are done investigating the bombing, can they go after whoever is responsible for kronos?
 
2013-06-05 12:12:01 PM  
DNRFTA because the Herald is worthless.

They'll be milking this incident for years.
 
2013-06-05 12:15:41 PM  

Jake Havechek: Panatheist: nekom: I have to give MUCH kudos to the first responders, doctors, nurses and everyone else involved.  As horrible as it was, it could have been worse.  I'm not saying DON'T tell a soldier "Thank you for your service", but maybe also remember to tell that to firemen, doctors, etc.

it could have been better if there wasn't a lock-down
I think that was a serious violation of peoples rights and was not necessary

The fark do you know?  You weren't here that day.

Besides, it was a suggestion, not a mandate,


But are ok with using prison terms like "lock down" (i.e. the involuntary confinement of prisoners) to describe what's going on in a hospital or a school?
 
2013-06-05 12:20:38 PM  

Mimic_Octopus: There was no lock-down. it was a request to stay inside. they cannot, yet, force a lock-down in the USA.   Even in school shootings or whatever, if yuo want to leave, they cannot detain you.  it is always a request masquerading as an order.   The most they can do is cordon off a specific crime scene while documenting evidence.


In a similar fashion, a thug/burglar/mugger who holds a large-calibre assault rifle wearing armour is simply making a "request" that you hand over your valuables, right?

bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com
 
2013-06-05 12:24:34 PM  
Government always makes everything better. Stop countering modern day liberalism with facts. They just needed more money.
 
2013-06-05 01:01:02 PM  
yay in the CSB department... my poor aunt was at Mass Gen for a week extra. She had gone in for exploratory surgery on Monday am talk about wrong place wrong time. My uncle had left for a bit and couldn't get back in to see her neither could her kids. (which is good cause I am telling you my one cousin looks alot like white hat) Compared to what other had gone through small inconvenience I know which is why it is a CSB and not a complaint.
 
2013-06-05 01:01:06 PM  

NutWrench: Jake Havechek: Panatheist: nekom: I have to give MUCH kudos to the first responders, doctors, nurses and everyone else involved.  As horrible as it was, it could have been worse.  I'm not saying DON'T tell a soldier "Thank you for your service", but maybe also remember to tell that to firemen, doctors, etc.

it could have been better if there wasn't a lock-down
I think that was a serious violation of peoples rights and was not necessary

The fark do you know?  You weren't here that day.

Besides, it was a suggestion, not a mandate,

But are ok with using prison terms like "lock down" (i.e. the involuntary confinement of prisoners) to describe what's going on in a hospital or a school?


Yeah, let's argue motherfarking semantics, okay?

Jesus wept.
 
2013-06-05 01:24:57 PM  

nekom: I have to give MUCH kudos to the first responders, doctors, nurses and everyone else involved.  As horrible as it was, it could have been worse.  I'm not saying DON'T tell a soldier "Thank you for your service", but maybe also remember to tell that to firemen, doctors, etc.


Very much so.

NutWrench: But are ok with using prison terms like "lock down" (i.e. the involuntary confinement of prisoners) to describe what's going on in a hospital or a school?


What else would you suggest using?  We hold active shooter drills fairly frequently, and 'locking down' is descriptive of what we do - shut and lock all doors(even interior ones), shutting of the lights and pulling the blinds, pulling people into interior rooms.  Heck, I'm fairly sure that 'most' people in the USA don't have an accurate understanding of what lock down means in a prison.

We have plenty of words that mean different things depending on specific context.  This is just another one.
 
2013-06-05 01:25:12 PM  
Heh, practice all you want.  I'm sure the for profit hospital will spend the extra money to support a reasonable "worst case scenario" plan.
 
2013-06-05 01:35:24 PM  

jaylectricity: I have a friend who volunteered to work on marathon day at Mass General. She was thinking she was in for a day of sprained ankles and bloody nipples.


Last year I jogged the marathon for the first time.  I planned ahead and put small pieces of medical tape on my nipples.

(CSB?)
 
2013-06-05 01:39:43 PM  

NutWrench: "We had a hospital full of people who couldn't leave. We had a staff that had spent the night that couldn't leave, and the day staff that couldn't get into the hospital. That was a scenario we had never anticipated

When the government gets involved in common sense decisions, all bets are off. What a clusterfark.


It wasn't that much different than a major snow storm.  Best example being the April Fool's storm in '97.  Inconvenient but we survived.  Actually the '97 storm was inconvenient for a couple days, the lockdown lasted a few hours.
 
2013-06-05 03:22:24 PM  

NutWrench: Jake Havechek: Panatheist: nekom: I have to give MUCH kudos to the first responders, doctors, nurses and everyone else involved.  As horrible as it was, it could have been worse.  I'm not saying DON'T tell a soldier "Thank you for your service", but maybe also remember to tell that to firemen, doctors, etc.

it could have been better if there wasn't a lock-down
I think that was a serious violation of peoples rights and was not necessary

The fark do you know?  You weren't here that day.

Besides, it was a suggestion, not a mandate,

But are ok with using prison terms like "lock down" (i.e. the involuntary confinement of prisoners) to describe what's going on in a hospital or a school?


Here's where that argument loses me. The police asked the people of Boston to stay inside, and from what I can tell, the people were OK with that.

There's a huge difference between "Don't leave your house for any reason" and "Hey, could you stay in? It would make our job easier." "Oh, sure. Just catch those sonsabiatches".
 
2013-06-05 04:57:24 PM  
Our hospital kind of panicked and said we couldn't leave and announced over the intercom and said we were in "lockdown" while I was in the cafeteria eating breakfast after a long night shift.  We were told (not by management) we could be terminated for leaving and that it was extremely "dangerous" to leave.  Several of us slipped out of back doors that the guards didn't think to watch so we knew it was an empty threat.  We had been there for 18 hours and we were damned if we were going to have to sleep on couches or rusty old cots during the day which is what would have happened.  I think the hospitals did their best with the information they were given but putting us on lock down was ridiculous.  Many would have stayed if they were just asked, not forced.  It's a nurse's or doctors innate instinct to help.  In an emergency you just don't know what's going to happen and there's always going to be a level of disorganization no matter how much you prepare.
 
2013-06-05 07:24:16 PM  

JennyArcade: Our hospital kind of panicked and said we couldn't leave and announced over the intercom and said we were in "lockdown" while I was in the cafeteria eating breakfast after a long night shift.  We were told (not by management) we could be terminated for leaving and that it was extremely "dangerous" to leave.  Several of us slipped out of back doors that the guards didn't think to watch so we knew it was an empty threat.  We had been there for 18 hours and we were damned if we were going to have to sleep on couches or rusty old cots during the day which is what would have happened.  I think the hospitals did their best with the information they were given but putting us on lock down was ridiculous.  Many would have stayed if they were just asked, not forced.  It's a nurse's or doctors innate instinct to help.  In an emergency you just don't know what's going to happen and there's always going to be a level of disorganization no matter how much you prepare.


No idea if your story is true, but I heard another story that I have no idea was true about a girl who worked at a restaurant and her boss said she couldn't leave work to go be with her family because she wasn't allowed to go out on the streets per BPD orders.
 
2013-06-05 09:53:59 PM  
We're going to be exploring the latest and greatest technology about how you can communicate in a situation where there's a lot going on on the airwaves

Landline?
 
2013-06-05 11:45:08 PM  

morg: We're going to be exploring the latest and greatest technology about how you can communicate in a situation where there's a lot going on on the airwaves

Landline?


It's amusing how we're all pretending the cell phone networks were just overloaded, when the Feds admitted ordering that the ordered the carriers to shut down service.
 
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