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(Rapid City Journal)   "Apparently, the triceratops was quite tasty and one of the favorite meals of the T. rex"   (rapidcityjournal.com) divider line 21
    More: Amusing, t-rex, Cretaceous Period, favorite meals, skeletons, northern hemispheres, Earth Science, paleontology  
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1752 clicks; posted to Geek » on 04 Jun 2013 at 9:26 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



21 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-06-04 10:14:12 AM  
unlike the stegosaurus who could totally kick ass


www.paleo.cc
 
2013-06-04 10:30:33 AM  
If children's books and toys have taught me anything, the T-Rex may have won, but the exploding volcano in the backround made the battle futile.
 
2013-06-04 10:35:13 AM  
Would love to hear the evidence for this 'parental pair' that he's talking about. It sounds like he's got an adult, two sub-adults, and the were buried relatively rapidly, thereby preventing scavenging. The behavioral stuff sounds like arm-waving.
 
2013-06-04 10:49:27 AM  
Also known as the RxRib.

/I'm 'stinctin' it!
 
2013-06-04 11:29:11 AM  
I farking *LOVE* dinosaurs!
 
2013-06-04 11:29:56 AM  
i.imgur.com
 
2013-06-04 11:39:17 AM  
And yet when I kill them in Skyrim, I never get any meat.

/My Skyrim has triceratops in it.
//Along with other nasties not in the vanilla game.
///I've only seen one ogre.
 
2013-06-04 11:48:18 AM  
Wait. I thought there was no triceratops, because the triceratops was actually just an adolescent torosaurus.
 
2013-06-04 12:23:21 PM  
Triceratops specimens were identified in the 1870s and 1880s. Torosaurus was identified in 1891. Therefore, even if they are different developmental stages of the same animal, the name "Triceratops" would be retained. RIP Brontosaurus.

-Archaeologist ;)
 
2013-06-04 01:04:49 PM  

HaveTrowelWillTravel: Triceratops specimens were identified in the 1870s and 1880s. Torosaurus was identified in 1891. Therefore, even if they are different developmental stages of the same animal, the name "Triceratops" would be retained. RIP Brontosaurus.

-Archaeologist ;)


Ain' no way I'm eatin' no damn "Apatoburgers" or "Diploburgers".

Brontosaurus forever, baby!
 
2013-06-04 01:06:48 PM  
Well of course T. Rex liked Triceratops...they tasted like chicken!

/likes chicken
 
2013-06-04 01:11:07 PM  
Of course they did, those bad boys had "USDA Prime" stamped all over them.

/Carve me off a ribeye and don't let your arms get too close to my mouth when you serve it up.
 
2013-06-04 01:14:09 PM  
Try Sara, she tops!

/strap on
 
2013-06-04 01:37:32 PM  

neversubmit: Try Sara, she tops!

/strap on


You really pegged that one.
 
2013-06-04 01:55:30 PM  

PainInTheASP: Of course they did, those bad boys had "USDA Prime" stamped all over them.

/Carve me off a ribeye and don't let your arms get too close to my mouth when you serve it up.


manmeetsscale.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-06-04 04:12:06 PM  

GreenAdder: Wait. I thought there was no triceratops, because the triceratops was actually just an adolescent torosaurus.


I would of course defer to dinodork on the subject, but I found this which appears to say that no, that's not true:

Torosaurus Is Not Triceratops: Ontogeny in Chasmosaurine Ceratopsids as a Case Study in Dinosaur Taxonomy
Methodology/Principal Findings
We assessed the relative maturity of Torosaurus and Triceratops specimens by coding skulls for characters that vary with maturity, and then using a clustering analysis to arrange them into a growth series. We found that a well-defined sequence of changes exists in horned dinosaurs: development of cranial ornament occurs in juveniles, followed by fusion of the skull roof in subadults, and finally, the epoccipitals, epijugals, and rostral fuse to the skull in adults. Using this scheme, we identified mature and immature individuals of both Torosaurus and Triceratops. Furthermore, we describe the ventral depressions on the frill of Triceratops, and show that they differ in shape and position from the parietal fenestrae of Torosaurus. Thus, we conclude that these structures are not intermediates between the solid frill of Triceratops and the fenestrated frill of Torosaurus.


The original idea that Torosaurus is the mature form of Triceratops seems to have originated with Jack Horner, on some thin evidence.  Sometimes I swear Horner just makes shiat up.
 
2013-06-04 06:08:58 PM  

dittybopper: The original idea that Torosaurus is the mature form of Triceratops seems to have originated with Jack Horner, on some thin evidence.  Sometimes I swear Horner just makes shiat up.


That lying jerk, with his Christmas pie. How does removing fruit from a pie make you a good boy?

Now I just don't know what to believe anymore.
 
2013-06-04 08:05:43 PM  

dittybopper: GreenAdder: Wait. I thought there was no triceratops, because the triceratops was actually just an adolescent torosaurus.

I would of course defer to dinodork on the subject, but I found this which appears to say that no, that's not true:

Torosaurus Is Not Triceratops: Ontogeny in Chasmosaurine Ceratopsids as a Case Study in Dinosaur Taxonomy
Methodology/Principal Findings
We assessed the relative maturity of Torosaurus and Triceratops specimens by coding skulls for characters that vary with maturity, and then using a clustering analysis to arrange them into a growth series. We found that a well-defined sequence of changes exists in horned dinosaurs: development of cranial ornament occurs in juveniles, followed by fusion of the skull roof in subadults, and finally, the epoccipitals, epijugals, and rostral fuse to the skull in adults. Using this scheme, we identified mature and immature individuals of both Torosaurus and Triceratops. Furthermore, we describe the ventral depressions on the frill of Triceratops, and show that they differ in shape and position from the parietal fenestrae of Torosaurus. Thus, we conclude that these structures are not intermediates between the solid frill of Triceratops and the fenestrated frill of Torosaurus.

The original idea that Torosaurus is the mature form of Triceratops seems to have originated with Jack Horner, on some thin evidence.  Sometimes I swear Horner just makes shiat up.


Sorry for the late reply, i am doing field work in western Kansas. You're right on. The lumping is an MOR thing. Like lumping Pachycephalosaurus with Stygimoloch and Dracorex. Basically pulling it out of their proverbial butts.
 
2013-06-04 09:37:13 PM  

Dinodork: Sorry for the late reply, i am doing field work in western Kansas. You're right on. The lumping is an MOR thing. Like lumping Pachycephalosaurus with Stygimoloch and Dracorex. Basically pulling it out of their proverbial butts.


Sometimes I wonder how much research isn't driven by actual discoveries, but by the need (either actual or perceived) to publish.
 
2013-06-04 09:54:23 PM  

dittybopper: Dinodork: Sorry for the late reply, i am doing field work in western Kansas. You're right on. The lumping is an MOR thing. Like lumping Pachycephalosaurus with Stygimoloch and Dracorex. Basically pulling it out of their proverbial butts.

Sometimes I wonder how much research isn't driven by actual discoveries, but by the need (either actual or perceived) to publish.


Lumpers versus Splitters...the debate has raged hot and heavy at least since the days of Linnaeus.
 
2013-06-05 03:15:40 AM  
si0.twimg.com
 
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