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(Orlando Sentinel)   Clearly, the last people you need on the board of your state water agency are environmental experts   (orlandosentinel.com) divider line 91
    More: Florida, water molecules, South Florida Water Management District, environmentalisms, water district, Florida Gulf Coast, Rick Scott, civil engineers, Charlie Crist  
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2753 clicks; posted to Politics » on 01 Jun 2013 at 2:11 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-06-01 01:05:48 PM  
And we're surprised? Florida has had nearly 1000 people a moving into the state for at least the past decade. "Development" has been the priority, much more important than protecting the environment. Frank Stronach has applied for a water permit for a cattle ranch near Silver Springs - a permit that requests more water than the entire nearby city of Ocala. Odds are, he's going to get it, or something close.

Here's a tip - if you drive your kids to Florida for Disneyworld, spend a day and take them to swim in the springs along the way. Most people don't even know about them, but they are pretty amazing. All the indications are there that they are in a steep decline and the WMDs are doing little to protect them - while they might not disappear altogether, they probably won't be worth seeing in 10 or 20 years.
 
2013-06-01 01:41:28 PM  

Elegy: And we're surprised? Florida has had nearly 1000 people a moving into the state for at least the past decade. "Development" has been the priority, much more important than protecting the environment. Frank Stronach has applied for a water permit for a cattle ranch near Silver Springs - a permit that requests more water than the entire nearby city of Ocala. Odds are, he's going to get it, or something close.

Here's a tip - if you drive your kids to Florida for Disneyworld, spend a day and take them to swim in the springs along the way. Most people don't even know about them, but they are pretty amazing. All the indications are there that they are in a steep decline and the WMDs are doing little to protect them - while they might not disappear altogether, they probably won't be worth seeing in 10 or 20 years.


Don't forget the Niagara fiasco, politics at it's worst. Link
 
2013-06-01 02:13:48 PM  
A cattle ranch in Florida? LOL.
 
2013-06-01 02:16:32 PM  
In fairness, this mess has been brewing for a long while. John D. MacDonald cunically warned of the developers and the blatant cronyism for years, and folks just said "more Travis McGee books please."

I loved to visit Florida when I was helping run boats out that way, and I love Miami and the Keys, but the state is beyond corrupt at the even the lowest town levels, and folks apparently like it, because they keep voting these folks into office. I might think about putting down some roots out towards the Keys, but anywhere inland is just an invitation to get rooked over and over again. Land speculation and development has been a giant rip off since I was in college and the sheer magnitude of the dirty goings on in real estate and development is just staggering. Let's not even mention the smuggling and odd bits of business that ply the shores.

It's a nice place to visit, but damned if I'd live on the mainland...
 
2013-06-01 02:17:07 PM  
Clearly, the last people you need on the board of your state water agency are environmental experts

Of course! Pesky things like that get in the way of business.

/This is what Republicans actually believe
 
2013-06-01 02:18:37 PM  
For the first time in nearly three decades, none of the Florida's water-management agencies - which are supposed to safeguard the state's wetlands, rivers and aquifers - has a board member who is an environmentalist.
Environmental activists are troubled because the boards are dominated by representatives of agribusiness, real estate and development industries.


This is a feature, not a flaw to Republicans.
 
2013-06-01 02:19:26 PM  

yellowcat: Elegy: And we're surprised? Florida has had nearly 1000 people a moving into the state for at least the past decade. "Development" has been the priority, much more important than protecting the environment. Frank Stronach has applied for a water permit for a cattle ranch near Silver Springs - a permit that requests more water than the entire nearby city of Ocala. Odds are, he's going to get it, or something close.

Here's a tip - if you drive your kids to Florida for Disneyworld, spend a day and take them to swim in the springs along the way. Most people don't even know about them, but they are pretty amazing. All the indications are there that they are in a steep decline and the WMDs are doing little to protect them - while they might not disappear altogether, they probably won't be worth seeing in 10 or 20 years.

Don't forget the Niagara fiasco, politics at it's worst. Link


Wow. Just wow. Remember, folks, corporate interests outweigh those of the people you've elected to look after your best interests. Even more so when the corporation can simply bankrupt your city through legal shenanigans.

Anyway, fark the aquifer, amirite?
 
2013-06-01 02:25:19 PM  

theorellior: A cattle ranch in Florida? LOL.


Actually, cattle trade through Florida and Cuba was key for the US early on.  My family was instrumental in the Florida cattle and cigar trade in Tampa and was central to the Ybor City development.  It is not as big now, but back in the 19th century it was a pretty important peg in cattle trade.  Grass grows very well in Florida, why wouldn't cattle do well there?  Maintaining pasture is a lot easier in Florida than it is here in Wyoming.

Of course, now that golf courses, car washes, and other development is devastating Florida's water supply, agriculture suffers.  Also, some of that is agriculture's fault for not adapting to better technologies.
 
2013-06-01 02:26:25 PM  
If they want actual environmental scientists on the board, great idea.

If they just want environmental activists, then fark no.
 
2013-06-01 02:27:07 PM  

iaazathot: theorellior: A cattle ranch in Florida? LOL.

Actually, cattle trade through Florida and Cuba was key for the US early on.  My family was instrumental in the Florida cattle and cigar trade in Tampa and was central to the Ybor City development.  It is not as big now, but back in the 19th century it was a pretty important peg in cattle trade.  Grass grows very well in Florida, why wouldn't cattle do well there?  Maintaining pasture is a lot easier in Florida than it is here in Wyoming.

Of course, now that golf courses, car washes, and other development is devastating Florida's water supply, agriculture suffers.  Also, some of that is agriculture's fault for not adapting to better technologies.


Well, whaddaya know. I done learned something today on Fark.
 
2013-06-01 02:28:19 PM  

Elegy: Here's a tip - if you drive your kids to Florida for Disneyworld, spend a day and take them to swim in the springs along the way. Most people don't even know about them, but they are pretty amazing. All the indications are there that they are in a steep decline and the WMDs are doing little to protect them - while they might not disappear altogether, they probably won't be worth seeing in 10 or 20 years.


Lived in Jacksonville for 10 years.  Loved diving/swimming in the springs.  Used to go to this awesome one that started in a huge sinkhole, massive column straight down into the limestone.   Clearest coolest water I've ever seen year round.
 
2013-06-01 02:29:56 PM  

Ontos: If they want actual environmental scientists on the board, great idea.

If they just want environmental activists, then fark no.


yup if its stacked with hydrogeologists then a-ok
 
2013-06-01 02:31:47 PM  

hubiestubert: In fairness, this mess has been brewing for a long while. John D. MacDonald cunically warned of the developers and the blatant cronyism for years, and folks just said "more Travis McGee books please."

I loved to visit Florida when I was helping run boats out that way, and I love Miami and the Keys, but the state is beyond corrupt at the even the lowest town levels, and folks apparently like it, because they keep voting these folks into office. I might think about putting down some roots out towards the Keys, but anywhere inland is just an invitation to get rooked over and over again. Land speculation and development has been a giant rip off since I was in college and the sheer magnitude of the dirty goings on in real estate and development is just staggering. Let's not even mention the smuggling and odd bits of business that ply the shores.

It's a nice place to visit, but damned if I'd live on the mainland...


I vacation in Florida quite a bit and I like to follow the politics of that state. And one thing I've noticed is that Agribusiness is just as bad at playing corrupt politics in Florida as land and real estate developers are.

US Sugar is a big offender in this and pretty much dominates what happens to the Everglades and Lake Okeechobee.
 
2013-06-01 02:33:02 PM  

Representative of the unwashed masses: Ontos: If they want actual environmental scientists on the board, great idea.

If they just want environmental activists, then fark no.

yup if its stacked with hydrogeologists then a-ok


Totally.  Get some hydrogeologists, geomorphologists, and maybe some wetland and riparian ecologists/biologists on there as and you're talking.
 
2013-06-01 02:33:41 PM  

theorellior: iaazathot: theorellior: A cattle ranch in Florida? LOL.

Actually, cattle trade through Florida and Cuba was key for the US early on.  My family was instrumental in the Florida cattle and cigar trade in Tampa and was central to the Ybor City development.  It is not as big now, but back in the 19th century it was a pretty important peg in cattle trade.  Grass grows very well in Florida, why wouldn't cattle do well there?  Maintaining pasture is a lot easier in Florida than it is here in Wyoming.

Of course, now that golf courses, car washes, and other development is devastating Florida's water supply, agriculture suffers.  Also, some of that is agriculture's fault for not adapting to better technologies.

Well, whaddaya know. I done learned something today on Fark.


Here is the Wikipedia article on Capt. James McKay.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_McKay_Sr">http://en.wikipedia.org/ wiki/James_McKay_Sr.
 
2013-06-01 02:36:39 PM  

Mrtraveler01: hubiestubert: In fairness, this mess has been brewing for a long while. John D. MacDonald cunically warned of the developers and the blatant cronyism for years, and folks just said "more Travis McGee books please."

I loved to visit Florida when I was helping run boats out that way, and I love Miami and the Keys, but the state is beyond corrupt at the even the lowest town levels, and folks apparently like it, because they keep voting these folks into office. I might think about putting down some roots out towards the Keys, but anywhere inland is just an invitation to get rooked over and over again. Land speculation and development has been a giant rip off since I was in college and the sheer magnitude of the dirty goings on in real estate and development is just staggering. Let's not even mention the smuggling and odd bits of business that ply the shores.

It's a nice place to visit, but damned if I'd live on the mainland...

I vacation in Florida quite a bit and I like to follow the politics of that state. And one thing I've noticed is that Agribusiness is just as bad at playing corrupt politics in Florida as land and real estate developers are.

US Sugar is a big offender in this and pretty much dominates what happens to the Everglades and Lake Okeechobee.


This is very true.  Tomato farmers, finally, went to more efficient irrigation technologies to conserve water, but a lot of other agribusiness has their heads stuck in the sand.  I couldn't stand being in Florida anymore, because it was just so damn crazy.
 
2013-06-01 02:38:14 PM  

Satanic_Hamster: Elegy: Here's a tip - if you drive your kids to Florida for Disneyworld, spend a day and take them to swim in the springs along the way. Most people don't even know about them, but they are pretty amazing. All the indications are there that they are in a steep decline and the WMDs are doing little to protect them - while they might not disappear altogether, they probably won't be worth seeing in 10 or 20 years.

Lived in Jacksonville for 10 years.  Loved diving/swimming in the springs.  Used to go to this awesome one that started in a huge sinkhole, massive column straight down into the limestone.   Clearest coolest water I've ever seen year round.


Are you talking about "the well" at Silver Glenn spring (just west of Lake George)? I was there last week snorkeling.

/Yes I'm fat and pasty
//deal with it.
///bonus springs goodness from the same place
 
2013-06-01 02:43:54 PM  

iaazathot: Mrtraveler01: hubiestubert: In fairness, this mess has been brewing for a long while. John D. MacDonald cunically warned of the developers and the blatant cronyism for years, and folks just said "more Travis McGee books please."

I loved to visit Florida when I was helping run boats out that way, and I love Miami and the Keys, but the state is beyond corrupt at the even the lowest town levels, and folks apparently like it, because they keep voting these folks into office. I might think about putting down some roots out towards the Keys, but anywhere inland is just an invitation to get rooked over and over again. Land speculation and development has been a giant rip off since I was in college and the sheer magnitude of the dirty goings on in real estate and development is just staggering. Let's not even mention the smuggling and odd bits of business that ply the shores.

It's a nice place to visit, but damned if I'd live on the mainland...

I vacation in Florida quite a bit and I like to follow the politics of that state. And one thing I've noticed is that Agribusiness is just as bad at playing corrupt politics in Florida as land and real estate developers are.

US Sugar is a big offender in this and pretty much dominates what happens to the Everglades and Lake Okeechobee.

This is very true.  Tomato farmers, finally, went to more efficient irrigation technologies to conserve water, but a lot of other agribusiness has their heads stuck in the sand.  I couldn't stand being in Florida anymore, because it was just so damn crazy.


I love Miami as a visitor. The city is always popping, Calle Ocho and the surrounding neighborhhods never fail me for food, drink, and wee tiny men to take my money playing dominos, and lovely ladies to rest my gaze upon. The city is bustling and always fun, but it's a place to visit once you look behind the curtains and realize the politics.

The Keys have their own currents and woes, but at least there's open water to disappear into.
 
2013-06-01 02:47:47 PM  

theorellior: iaazathot: theorellior: A cattle ranch in Florida? LOL.

Actually, cattle trade through Florida and Cuba was key for the US early on.  My family was instrumental in the Florida cattle and cigar trade in Tampa and was central to the Ybor City development.  It is not as big now, but back in the 19th century it was a pretty important peg in cattle trade.  Grass grows very well in Florida, why wouldn't cattle do well there?  Maintaining pasture is a lot easier in Florida than it is here in Wyoming.

Of course, now that golf courses, car washes, and other development is devastating Florida's water supply, agriculture suffers.  Also, some of that is agriculture's fault for not adapting to better technologies.

Well, whaddaya know. I done learned something today on Fark.


Florida is 4th Overall in cow-calf ranching. Meaning Florida breeds a good portion of the cattle your steaks comes from.
 
2013-06-01 03:07:59 PM  
of course they they don't want expert working on the board they want people who will rubber stamp and request they get.
 
2013-06-01 03:16:48 PM  

Ontos: If they want actual environmental scientists on the board, great idea.

If they just want environmental activists, then fark no.


I'm sure the corporate job-creating job creators are all totally levelheaded and looking out for the best interests of society. (Jobs.) But environmental activists?

FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFUUUUUUUUUUU

(Jobs)
 
2013-06-01 03:17:48 PM  
Subby fails to mention that the "environmental expert" is really a lawyer and "environmental activist".   Hint: If it walks and talks like Al Gore and not a scientist, they aren't "experts" but "advocates" or "activists".  If the lawyer was replaced by, say, a conservationist with a history of saving endangered animals and managing their spaces, it's hard to call that a downgrade.
 
2013-06-01 03:19:41 PM  
That is funny Subby, you said "Environmental Experts" and the article is talking about "Environmental Activists."  Sadly it seems you do not realize one does not automatically equal the other...  PETA are activists, but I sure as hell wouldn't want them having a seat at the table when it comes to "how to run a county animal shelter.."
 
2013-06-01 03:21:48 PM  

Elegy: Are you talking about "the well" at Silver Glenn spring (just west of Lake George)? I was there last week snorkeling.

/Yes I'm fat and pasty
//deal with it.
///bonus springs goodness from the same place


Used to go there a few times a year in high school, then canoeing near by.  Beautiful place.
 
2013-06-01 03:23:19 PM  

iaazathot: theorellior: iaazathot: theorellior: A cattle ranch in Florida? LOL.

Actually, cattle trade through Florida and Cuba was key for the US early on.  My family was instrumental in the Florida cattle and cigar trade in Tampa and was central to the Ybor City development.  It is not as big now, but back in the 19th century it was a pretty important peg in cattle trade.  Grass grows very well in Florida, why wouldn't cattle do well there?  Maintaining pasture is a lot easier in Florida than it is here in Wyoming.

Of course, now that golf courses, car washes, and other development is devastating Florida's water supply, agriculture suffers.  Also, some of that is agriculture's fault for not adapting to better technologies.

Well, whaddaya know. I done learned something today on Fark.

Here is the Wikipedia article on Capt. James McKay.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_McKay_Sr">http://en.wikipedia.org/ wiki/James_McKay_Sr.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacob_Summerlin
 
2013-06-01 03:33:28 PM  
Since when are Environmentalists "experts"?
 
2013-06-01 03:34:04 PM  

MyRandomName: Since when are Environmentalists "experts"?


And by this I mean activists.  Not Environmental scientists.
 
2013-06-01 03:41:46 PM  
Once again Republicans proving that government does not work by making sure it does not work via their own actions.
 
2013-06-01 03:50:08 PM  
Not all activists are experts, sure. However some of them actually are, so let's not get all 'herp di derp activist bad' just because it's a buzzword that could mean the person is actually an uneducated douche.
 
2013-06-01 03:50:57 PM  

tbeatty: Subby fails to mention that the "environmental expert" is really a lawyer and "environmental activist".   Hint: If it walks and talks like Al Gore and not a scientist, they aren't "experts" but "advocates" or "activists".  If the lawyer was replaced by, say, a conservationist with a history of saving endangered animals and managing their spaces, it's hard to call that a downgrade.


I highly doubt that was the case.
 
2013-06-01 03:52:20 PM  

jpo2269: That is funny Subby, you said "Environmental Experts" and the article is talking about "Environmental Activists."  Sadly it seems you do not realize one does not automatically equal the other...  PETA are activists, but I sure as hell wouldn't want them having a seat at the table when it comes to "how to run a county animal shelter.."


But agribusiness, real estate and development industry lobbyists are still OK right?
 
2013-06-01 03:59:54 PM  

Cataholic: iaazathot: theorellior: iaazathot: theorellior: A cattle ranch in Florida? LOL.

Actually, cattle trade through Florida and Cuba was key for the US early on.  My family was instrumental in the Florida cattle and cigar trade in Tampa and was central to the Ybor City development.  It is not as big now, but back in the 19th century it was a pretty important peg in cattle trade.  Grass grows very well in Florida, why wouldn't cattle do well there?  Maintaining pasture is a lot easier in Florida than it is here in Wyoming.

Of course, now that golf courses, car washes, and other development is devastating Florida's water supply, agriculture suffers.  Also, some of that is agriculture's fault for not adapting to better technologies.

Well, whaddaya know. I done learned something today on Fark.

Here is the Wikipedia article on Capt. James McKay.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_McKay_Sr">http://en.wikipedia.org/ wiki/James_McKay_Sr.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacob_Summerlin


Yes, Summerlin was instrumental in the formation of the cattle trade in Florida.  Capt. McKay was instrumental in the shipping of cattle to Cuba through Tampa Bay.

Summerlin was also well known for his generous donations of land to the Orlando area.

It's a shame about the Civil War era history and slave owning for both men.  It is not a proud portion of my family's history.  I can at least say that my grandfather, great grandson to Capt. McKay was able to leave behind a lot of the sensibilities found in old Florida families.
 
2013-06-01 04:00:28 PM  

MyRandomName: MyRandomName: Since when are Environmentalists "experts"?

And by this I mean activists.  Not Environmental scientists.


Well, if that's not a justification for having the boards stocked with representatives of agribusiness, real estate and development industries, I don't know what is.

*rolls eyes*
 
2013-06-01 04:04:13 PM  
The free market can take care of the environment way better than any "government" board can.  Look at history and you can see.  DR. RON PAUL can tell you more about this.
 
2013-06-01 04:05:55 PM  

Elegy: And we're surprised? Florida has had nearly 1000 people a moving into the state for at least the past decade. "Development" has been the priority, much more important than protecting the environment. Frank Stronach has applied for a water permit for a cattle ranch near Silver Springs - a permit that requests more water than the entire nearby city of Ocala. Odds are, he's going to get it, or something close.

Here's a tip - if you drive your kids to Florida for Disneyworld, spend a day and take them to swim in the springs along the way. Most people don't even know about them, but they are pretty amazing. All the indications are there that they are in a steep decline and the WMDs are doing little to protect them - while they might not disappear altogether, they probably won't be worth seeing in 10 or 20 years.


Went to Ginnie Springs while going to school in FL. Was indeed phenomenal.
 
2013-06-01 04:18:55 PM  

theorellior: tbeatty: Subby fails to mention that the "environmental expert" is really a lawyer and "environmental activist".   Hint: If it walks and talks like Al Gore and not a scientist, they aren't "experts" but "advocates" or "activists".  If the lawyer was replaced by, say, a conservationist with a history of saving endangered animals and managing their spaces, it's hard to call that a downgrade.

I highly doubt that was the case.


RTFA
 
2013-06-01 04:38:50 PM  

tbeatty: theorellior: tbeatty: Subby fails to mention that the "environmental expert" is really a lawyer and "environmental activist".   Hint: If it walks and talks like Al Gore and not a scientist, they aren't "experts" but "advocates" or "activists".  If the lawyer was replaced by, say, a conservationist with a history of saving endangered animals and managing their spaces, it's hard to call that a downgrade.

I highly doubt that was the case.

RTFA


In his application for a gubernatorial appointment, Burnett cited the Guard's conservation work on military bases involving gopher tortoises and red-cockaded woodpeckers, though he misspelled the name of the endangered bird.

Sounds legit.
 
2013-06-01 05:01:10 PM  
Environmental activists should have no say in how a county manages water. Only free market activists.

Conservatism!
 
2013-06-01 05:12:47 PM  

theorellior: A cattle ranch in Florida? LOL.


Water Buffalo?
 
2013-06-01 05:16:51 PM  

tbeatty: Al Gore


DRINK!
 
2013-06-01 05:28:52 PM  

Ontos: If they want actual environmental scientists on the board, great idea.

If they just want environmental activists, then fark no.


So what happens when a scientist, using scientific data and measurements, tell you that you're farking up by using water too fast and polluting the water that's left too much?
Do they automatically become "environmental activists" for telling the truth?
Or are they only "scientists" when sucking corporate cock?

Here's a hint: "activists" usually start out either as scientists who have learned the truth, or as laymen who have seen the science that gives them the truth.
 
2013-06-01 06:10:05 PM  

rewind2846: Ontos: If they want actual environmental scientists on the board, great idea.

If they just want environmental activists, then fark no.

So what happens when a scientist, using scientific data and measurements, tell you that you're farking up by using water too fast and polluting the water that's left too much?
Do they automatically become "environmental activists" for telling the truth?
Or are they only "scientists" when sucking corporate cock?

Here's a hint: "activists" usually start out either as scientists who have learned the truth, or as laymen who have seen the science that gives them the truth.


"Activists" start with an agenda and will bend facts or lie by omission to support their agenda.

Scientists actually conduct and review research in order come to a valid conclusion following the research using verified and consistent methodology.

Personally, I like decisions to be made on the basis of demonstrable facts and proven logic rather than emotion and personal opinion, but that's just me.

If you can't figure out the difference, explaining it to you isn't going to help.
 
2013-06-01 06:22:33 PM  

theknuckler_33: Well, if that's not a justification for having the boards stocked with representatives of agribusiness, real estate and development industries, I don't know what is.


or maybe bridge the gap with engineers or hydrogeologist.  Some folks can see both sides without muddying the waters too bad.

/yes, I did
 
2013-06-01 06:23:39 PM  
What do these assholes expect?  Do they actually believe that republicans and teabaggers are going to be interested in representing their interests?
 
2013-06-01 06:25:06 PM  

Fart_Machine: jpo2269: That is funny Subby, you said "Environmental Experts" and the article is talking about "Environmental Activists."  Sadly it seems you do not realize one does not automatically equal the other...  PETA are activists, but I sure as hell wouldn't want them having a seat at the table when it comes to "how to run a county animal shelter.."

But agribusiness, real estate and development industry lobbyists are still OK right?


FM, did I make that claim?

No, I didn't, try to stay on topic.
 
2013-06-01 06:28:53 PM  
fc05.deviantart.net
 
2013-06-01 06:36:12 PM  

INeedAName: Not all activists are experts, sure. However some of them actually are, so let's not get all 'herp di derp activist bad' just because it's a buzzword that could mean the person is actually an uneducated douche.


Many self-proclaimed environmentalists are just as ignorant on the issues as someone completely removed from the issue.   CASE IN POINT. However, many of these are folks with an ulterior motive and are less interested in the actual issue than they are about swinging policy to meet their worldview.  There are those that really know the issues and are activist as well.

Environmentalist is a term that is easy to stereotype, but is actually pretty vague.
 
2013-06-01 06:40:21 PM  
Ontos:

If you can't figure out the difference, explaining it to you isn't going to help.

Explaining to you that once the actual science is found, there's bound to be emotion involved would be pointless.

It's like seeing your house on fire, and not becoming excited about it, even when the evidence proves beyond a doubt that those are real flames, real smoke, and it's really your house.
Humans are farking things up in florida. That is fact. Getting pissed about it does not negate that fact.

BTW, those people you call "activists", if they are smart (and most on the right aren't) tend to have the evidence they need at hand, proven by those Mr Spock-like scientists that seem to only exist in your imagination. They gather the evidence, then emotion call them to speak out on it. Sometimes the scientists do as well. After all, they're only human.
 
2013-06-01 06:41:16 PM  

jpo2269: Fart_Machine: jpo2269: That is funny Subby, you said "Environmental Experts" and the article is talking about "Environmental Activists."  Sadly it seems you do not realize one does not automatically equal the other...  PETA are activists, but I sure as hell wouldn't want them having a seat at the table when it comes to "how to run a county animal shelter.."

But agribusiness, real estate and development industry lobbyists are still OK right?

FM, did I make that claim?

No, I didn't, try to stay on topic.


You just chose to ignore that the other members of the board were also not experts but were activists for business interests.  I'm sure it was just an accident.
 
2013-06-01 06:46:53 PM  

Great_Milenko: What do these assholes expect?  Do they actually believe that republicans and teabaggers are going to be interested in representing their interests?


I have no issues representing a conservative viewpoint and I have no issues representing the interest of the environment.  They are not always mutually exclusive.
 
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