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(Japan Today)   Japan's impassioned defense of whaling as necessary for scientific research on endangered whale species bears fruit: Can Icelandic whale meat successfully serve as luxury-priced doggie treats in Japan? The answer is yes   (japantoday.com) divider line 8
    More: Asinine, fin whales, whales, Can Icelandic, dogs, NGO, Japan, Iceland, Icelandic  
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638 clicks; posted to Geek » on 30 May 2013 at 3:07 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-30 03:35:10 PM  
The meat used to make the jerky was imported from Iceland and was sourced from Fin whales, a species listed (since 2008) as "endangered" on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Icelandic whalers caught 125 Fin whales in 2009, a further 148 in 2010, and plan to catch over 180 in 2013. Japan caught a total of 18 Fin whales between 2005 and 2012, all of them from Antarctic waters. While Japan exploits a legal loophole in the IWC's ban on commercial whaling, Iceland openly defies the ban.

  3.bp.blogspot.com

/does not give a fark because Japan.
 
2013-05-30 03:41:25 PM  
What the hell Japan... seriously.
 
2013-05-30 04:03:22 PM  
So now that the science is done, can we sink these "research" ships can call it a wrap?

/One MK-48 and we'll never have to hear people complaining about the damn whales again.
 
2013-05-30 04:06:02 PM  

WordsnCollision: The meat used to make the jerky was imported from Iceland and was sourced from Fin whales, a species listed (since 2008) as "endangered" on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Icelandic whalers caught 125 Fin whales in 2009, a further 148 in 2010, and plan to catch over 180 in 2013. Japan caught a total of 18 Fin whales between 2005 and 2012, all of them from Antarctic waters. While Japan exploits a legal loophole in the IWC's ban on commercial whaling, Iceland openly defies the ban.

  [3.bp.blogspot.com image 600x450]

/does not give a fark because Japan.


I'm going from memory here (I'm on a phone), but I thought he orchestrated the sinking of two Icelanding whaling vessels in the 1980s, and Sea Shepherd sent a vessel that way a handful of years ago. Differences may also be due to the different quotas involved - 150ish with Iceland, 1000ish with Japan. Regardless, I have a very strong suspicion that the guy opposes whaling in the North Atlantic.


Mr. Pokeylope: What the hell Japan... seriously.


The thing is, if memory serves, the countries with a CITES reservation on fin whales might be just Iceland and Japan (maybe Norway?) so the export market for this stuff is limited to those countries. A silver lining, if you're looking for one.
 
2013-05-30 04:07:00 PM  

Damnhippyfreak: but I thought he orchestrated the sinking of two Icelanding Icelandic whaling vessels in the 1980s

 
2013-05-30 04:15:30 PM  
Can we reach an effective compromise by making luxury dog treats out of Icelandic and Japanese whalers?
 
2013-05-31 08:35:15 AM  
 What kind of sick farker would use an endangered animal for doggy treats? It's another example to the elitism that infects most societies that someone would be willing to do something like this just because it makes them feel special for being able to obtain something rare. These "people" really have no soul.
 
2013-05-31 11:43:27 PM  
Save the Whales!

We may need to eat them later.
 
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