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(The Verge)   Rival factions of concertgoers brawl and throw food onstage during debut of cutting-edge artist's new work, forcing ejection of 40 people. Fark: it happened 100 years ago in Paris, and the work in question was Stravinski's ballet "The Rite of Spring"   (theverge.com) divider line 37
    More: Silly, Rival Factions, Igor Stravinsky, ballets, Le Figaro, Parisians, Stony Brook University, music critics, minimalism  
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584 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 30 May 2013 at 12:10 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-30 12:19:09 PM
The fact that the audience came pre-supplied with vegetable projectiles certainly would indicate that they were expecting trouble.  (If, in fact, they didn't step out during the performance to arm themselves.)

\amazing music
 
2013-05-30 12:19:23 PM
Who didn't know this? I thought I everyone who ever "liked the dinosaurs" in Fantasia knew this trivial factoid.
 
2013-05-30 12:21:38 PM
You know who else had a song about springtime that caused riots?
 
2013-05-30 12:22:54 PM

Trocadero: Who didn't know this? I thought I everyone who ever "liked the dinosaurs" in Fantasia knew this trivial factoid.


My favorite early 20th century composer is kinda obscure, you probably haven't heard of him.  He's kinda, like, you know, like, old school baroque but in a new school / west coast chamber music with a kind of slamcore vibe, kinda like No Wave / snowcore and Parisian cellostep house.  yeah, it's really cutting edge or should I say bleeding edge.  Yeah. He's really not all, you know, corporate and iTunesy.  He kept it real, you know.
 
2013-05-30 12:24:48 PM

rickythepenguin: My favorite early 20th century composer is kinda obscure, you probably haven't heard of him. He's kinda, like, you know, like, old school baroque but in a new school / west coast chamber music with a kind of slamcore vibe, kinda like No Wave / snowcore and Parisian cellostep house. yeah, it's really cutting edge or should I say bleeding edge. Yeah. He's really not all, you know, corporate and iTunesy. He kept it real, you know.


Stravinski was so over by the time "Rite of Spring" came out. His early indie-lavbel stuff was way better. You wouldn't even know.
 
2013-05-30 12:25:36 PM
And i bet even back then there were a bunch of old people shaking their fist and screaming about these young people and their devil music.
 
2013-05-30 12:26:43 PM

GypsyJoker: The fact that the audience came pre-supplied with vegetable projectiles certainly would indicate that they were expecting trouble.  (If, in fact, they didn't step out during the performance to arm themselves.)

\amazing music


Food vendors at performances were pretty common - and often stuff we wouldn't even consider today (whole, cooked fish comes to find).  So, many of these people probably already had food at hand - and if you were really jonesing to huck produce at the bassoonist, it was just a quick nip out to the lobby to arm yourself.
 
2013-05-30 12:29:06 PM

phalamir: GypsyJoker: The fact that the audience came pre-supplied with vegetable projectiles certainly would indicate that they were expecting trouble.  (If, in fact, they didn't step out during the performance to arm themselves.)

\amazing music

Food vendors at performances were pretty common - and often stuff we wouldn't even consider today (whole, cooked fish comes to find).  So, many of these people probably already had food at hand - and if you were really jonesing to huck produce at the bassoonist, it was just a quick nip out to the lobby to arm yourself.


Ah.  Thanks for the info.

But, really, who hasn't wanted to throw something at a bassoonist?  (Actually, the French hornists were the ones I wanted to chuck things at--and that was while I was in the pit with them.)
 
2013-05-30 12:32:10 PM
I've always accused John Williams of ripping off "Rite" for his "Jaws" theme.

/he never returned my calls, nor did he answer my letters, so I finally gave it up
 
2013-05-30 12:34:52 PM

Trocadero: Who didn't know this? I thought I everyone who ever "liked the dinosaurs" in Fantasia knew this trivial factoid.


Most people don't know the "wedding march" is by  Felix Mendelssohn not that it is in C major.
 
2013-05-30 12:38:17 PM

Trocadero: Who didn't know this? I thought I everyone who ever "liked the dinosaurs" in Fantasia knew this trivial factoid.


You'd be surprised.  I put a trivia question about this into a contest I wrote, and a few of the teams missed it.  And that was with what I would consider a more-educated crowd than most.
 
2013-05-30 12:46:02 PM

phalamir: GypsyJoker: The fact that the audience came pre-supplied with vegetable projectiles certainly would indicate that they were expecting trouble.  (If, in fact, they didn't step out during the performance to arm themselves.)

\amazing music

Food vendors at performances were pretty common - and often stuff we wouldn't even consider today (whole, cooked fish comes to find).  So, many of these people probably already had food at hand - and if you were really jonesing to huck produce at the bassoonist, it was just a quick nip out to the lobby to arm yourself.


Apparently vendors also liked to stock their half-rotten veggies as well when word was out that a show was going to be controversial.

I always thought something was lost when much of the performing arts became suits and silence - maybe if the symphony was more of a rock concert it wouldn't be so rooted in the past. Then again, rock's now rooted in the past as well.
 
2013-05-30 12:50:00 PM
Approves:

www.theglobaldispatch.com
 
2013-05-30 12:53:05 PM
photos.imageevent.com
 
2013-05-30 12:55:54 PM
Igor Stravinsky, the great-great-grandfather of punk rock.  And Nijinsky invented slam dancing for the "Rite"... the dancers described slamming themselves to the floor so hard it shook their internal organs.
 
2013-05-30 12:57:39 PM
Wasn't the riot more about the choreography than the music?
 
2013-05-30 01:05:05 PM

SoupJohnB: I've always accused John Williams of ripping off "Rite" for his "Jaws" theme.



the grateful dead's bob weir says he stole part of "Victim Or the Crime" from "Rite".  Not having heard Rite (to my knowledge) i couldn't say what it was, but there's a cool ascending riff in "Victim" that Weir says he heisted.

and i recorded a show a few months ago where during a jam on "Cassidy", weir says, "i stole that from 'Siegfried's March'" but I don't know what he's talking about.  not a huge classical fan.
 
2013-05-30 01:07:43 PM

rickythepenguin: SoupJohnB: I've always accused John Williams of ripping off "Rite" for his "Jaws" theme.


the grateful dead's bob weir says he stole part of "Victim Or the Crime" from "Rite".  Not having heard Rite (to my knowledge) i couldn't say what it was, but there's a cool ascending riff in "Victim" that Weir says he heisted.

and i recorded a show a few months ago where during a jam on "Cassidy", weir says, "i stole that from 'Siegfried's March'" but I don't know what he's talking about.  not a huge classical fan.


Possibly "Siegfried's Funeral Music" (aka "Siegfried's Funeral March") from The Ring Cycle.
 
2013-05-30 01:33:22 PM

GypsyJoker: rickythepenguin: SoupJohnB: I've always accused John Williams of ripping off "Rite" for his "Jaws" theme.


the grateful dead's bob weir says he stole part of "Victim Or the Crime" from "Rite".  Not having heard Rite (to my knowledge) i couldn't say what it was, but there's a cool ascending riff in "Victim" that Weir says he heisted.

Possibly "Siegfried's Funeral Music" (aka "Siegfried's Funeral March") from The Ring Cycle.


Williams' score made the same use of two adjacent orchestral chords clashing in what at first sounds like discord, along with the unexpected percussion pounces, beats and accents.  Plus, the generous use of lower sound ranges.

/a sense of foreboding which creates tension in the lower brain centers and stem, aka our "reptile brains"

//IMHO
 
2013-05-30 01:39:08 PM

SoupJohnB: I've always accused John Williams of ripping off "Rite" for his "Jaws" theme.

/he never returned my calls, nor did he answer my letters, so I finally gave it up


Go to Youtube and listen to the 4th (last) movement of Dvorak's New World Symphony *Symphony #9). You will instantly say "Jaws!" I guarantee it.
 
2013-05-30 01:45:53 PM

GypsyJoker: Possibly "Siegfried's Funeral Music" (aka "Siegfried's Funeral March") from The Ring Cycle.



oh no, i should rephrase, i knew he was referring to the Ring Cycle, but I've never heard the work, so the reference -- which i got -- was lost on me.

i'll try to remember to send you the clip, maybe you can hear it.
 
2013-05-30 02:01:33 PM

Musikslayer: SoupJohnB: I've always accused John Williams of ripping off "Rite" for his "Jaws" theme.

Go to Youtube and listen to the 4th (last) movement of Dvorak's New World Symphony *Symphony #9). You will instantly say "Jaws!" I guarantee it.


Allegro non troppo, too. I rest my case.  Which (I think) was that musicians steal shamelessly from each other.

/Knew a Keyboard player from Nashville, who borrowed a few thousand dollars from me

//It was the last I saw of him
 
2013-05-30 02:10:46 PM
Trocadero Who didn't know this? I thought I everyone who ever "liked the dinosaurs" in Fantasia knew this trivial factoid.

Stravinsky despised the Stokowski re-jiggering "Rite" in "Fantasia", told Disney he'd even write a whole new piece for the film

Musikslayer Go to Youtube and listen to the 4th (last) movement of Dvorak's New World Symphony *Symphony #9).

...& the "Star Wars" theme is a slowed down "Sleepwalk" by Santo & Johnny...which is the ending music for American Gaffiti...
 
2013-05-30 02:14:10 PM

FlyingJ: ...& the "Star Wars" theme is a slowed down "Sleepwalk" by Santo & Johnny...which is the ending music for American Gaffiti...


whoa!  i'l have to research that.  i can hear Sleepwalk in my head but i can't hear the star wars part.....i'll hav eto check.
 
2013-05-30 02:21:30 PM

FlyingJ: Trocadero Who didn't know this? I thought I everyone who ever "liked the dinosaurs" in Fantasia knew this trivial factoid.

Stravinsky despised the Stokowski re-jiggering "Rite" in "Fantasia", told Disney he'd even write a whole new piece for the film

Musikslayer Go to Youtube and listen to the 4th (last) movement of Dvorak's New World Symphony *Symphony #9).


Poor Dvorak's 9th was plundered for every 3rd rate cowboy movie, that is until the ones scored by Ennio Morricone became the canon.

Decades of working in the so-called 'creative' industries have led me to conclude that the truly creative ones are about 0.01%; everyone else just steals.

Another factoid: Vladimir Nabokov's filthy nickname for the impresario who presented the ballet: Dangleleaf
 
2013-05-30 02:42:06 PM

SoupJohnB: I've always accused John Williams of ripping off "Rite" for his "Jaws" theme.

/he never returned my calls, nor did he answer my letters, so I finally gave it up


There are two kind of movie music composers : those who rip ''The rite of Springs'', and those who rip ''The New World Symphony'' by Dvorak.
 
2013-05-30 03:20:35 PM

padraig: SoupJohnB: I've always accused John Williams of ripping off "Rite" for his "Jaws" theme.

/he never returned my calls, nor did he answer my letters, so I finally gave it up

There are two kind of movie music composers : those who rip ''The rite of Springs'', and those who rip ''The New World Symphony'' by Dvorak.


If that was a nod to Enrico and a certain spaghetti western, I gotcha.  I taught a pet cockatiel to make the "oodle-toodle-doooo" sound.  Cockatiels are native to Australia, so I named him "Archie."

Also, the name on the grave was "Arch" Stanton.
 
2013-05-30 05:01:20 PM

TheShavingofOccam123: You know who else had a song about springtime that caused riots?


I vas born im Dusseldorf und zat iz vey zey call me Rolf!
 
2013-05-30 05:40:16 PM

one0nine: Igor Stravinsky, the great-great-grandfather of punk rock.  And Nijinsky invented slam dancing for the "Rite"... the dancers described slamming themselves to the floor so hard it shook their internal organs.


Yeah, yeah, it's always Stravinsky and Nijinsky. But can you name the person who did the set design for the original production, and what famous horror writer he influenced?
 
2013-05-30 06:33:56 PM
Robert Fripp is a "stealer" of two classical music pieces:
Holst: "Mars: bringer of War" for King Crimson's "Devil's Triangle". (To be fair, he asked Holst's estate or relative to cover it, they said no, so he did it anyway and just gave it a different name). Mellontrons FTW.

Stravinsky: "Rite of Spring" (main riff near the beginning) for "Larks Tongues in Aspic part 2".

/"Rite of Spring" and "The Planets" are two of my favourite classical music pieces EVER.
 
2013-05-30 09:33:33 PM

Third_Uncle_Eno: Robert Fripp is a "stealer" of two classical music pieces:
Holst: "Mars: bringer of War" for King Crimson's "Devil's Triangle". (To be fair, he asked Holst's estate or relative to cover it, they said no, so he did it anyway and just gave it a different name). Mellontrons FTW.

Stravinsky: "Rite of Spring" (main riff near the beginning) for "Larks Tongues in Aspic part 2".

/"Rite of Spring" and "The Planets" are two of my favourite classical music pieces EVER.


I love The Planets...some days, when I am particularly fed up at work, I crank it up driving home just to clear my mind for a bit. I also love the Second Suite in F...reminds me of an old love in college. That was one of my favorites to play in wind ensemble.
 
2013-05-30 11:00:54 PM

Third_Uncle_Eno: Robert Fripp is a "stealer" of two classical music pieces:
Holst: "Mars: bringer of War" for King Crimson's "Devil's Triangle". (To be fair, he asked Holst's estate or relative to cover it, they said no, so he did it anyway and just gave it a different name). Mellontrons FTW.

Stravinsky: "Rite of Spring" (main riff near the beginning) for "Larks Tongues in Aspic part 2".

/"Rite of Spring" and "The Planets" are two of my favourite classical music pieces EVER.


Actually, Crimson played "Mars" as their regular concert closer during the McDonald/Giles days, playing it straight and calling it "Mars."  (Fripp even introduced it as Holst's piece at the Fillmore West.)  There are several recordings of it on the full, four-disc  Epitaph box set.

"Peace: A Theme" was "inspired" by a Carcassi etude.
 
2013-05-31 12:13:58 AM

GypsyJoker: Third_Uncle_Eno: Robert Fripp is a "stealer" of two classical music pieces:
Holst: "Mars: bringer of War" for King Crimson's "Devil's Triangle". (To be fair, he asked Holst's estate or relative to cover it, they said no, so he did it anyway and just gave it a different name). Mellontrons FTW.

Stravinsky: "Rite of Spring" (main riff near the beginning) for "Larks Tongues in Aspic part 2".

/"Rite of Spring" and "The Planets" are two of my favourite classical music pieces EVER.

Actually, Crimson played "Mars" as their regular concert closer during the McDonald/Giles days, playing it straight and calling it "Mars."  (Fripp even introduced it as Holst's piece at the Fillmore West.)  There are several recordings of it on the full, four-disc  Epitaph box set.

"Peace: A Theme" was "inspired" by a Carcassi etude.


ahhhh i had forgotten that fact!
looked up the Epitaph box set, and kinda iffy on it. has more song repeats than the G.D. box set 1973-74.

/didn't know that about "peace".

peace out.
 
2013-05-31 12:43:14 AM

rickythepenguin: i'll try to remember to send you the clip, maybe you can hear it.


well i can't send without an email...
 
2013-05-31 02:35:21 AM

Third_Uncle_Eno: GypsyJoker: Third_Uncle_Eno: Robert Fripp is a "stealer" of two classical music pieces:
Holst: "Mars: bringer of War" for King Crimson's "Devil's Triangle". (To be fair, he asked Holst's estate or relative to cover it, they said no, so he did it anyway and just gave it a different name). Mellontrons FTW.

Stravinsky: "Rite of Spring" (main riff near the beginning) for "Larks Tongues in Aspic part 2".

/"Rite of Spring" and "The Planets" are two of my favourite classical music pieces EVER.

Actually, Crimson played "Mars" as their regular concert closer during the McDonald/Giles days, playing it straight and calling it "Mars."  (Fripp even introduced it as Holst's piece at the Fillmore West.)  There are several recordings of it on the full, four-disc  Epitaph box set.

"Peace: A Theme" was "inspired" by a Carcassi etude.

ahhhh i had forgotten that fact!
looked up the Epitaph box set, and kinda iffy on it. has more song repeats than the G.D. box set 1973-74.

/didn't know that about "peace".

peace out.


For me, the Epitaph 4-disc is well worth it. Not for everyone, especially as the recording is often sub-bootleg quality (the 2-disc version has the better-sounding tapes).  Performance-wise, though, it's fascinating to listen to how they progressed throughout the short time they were together, and gives hints--and great regrets--about what could have been.  They were truly astonishing musically, far ahead of their time, and it's easy to hear why Pete Townsend and Jimi Hendrix both thought that KC was the future of rock.
 
2013-05-31 02:36:18 AM

rickythepenguin: rickythepenguin: i'll try to remember to send you the clip, maybe you can hear it.

well i can't send without an email...


realitypolice at yahoo dot com

\yeah, I know Yahoo sucks
 
2013-05-31 06:42:19 AM
And since no one knew the answer it is: Nicholas Roerich, whose arctic landscape paintings inspired H.P. Lovecraft to write "The Mountains of Madness".
 
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