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(PBS)   Signs of Alzheimer's Disease: 10 Things You Should Know. Briefly   (pbs.org) divider line 101
    More: PSA, Alzheimer's Disease, PBS NewsHour, primary caregiver, context-free grammar  
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10941 clicks; posted to Main » on 29 May 2013 at 4:58 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-29 03:26:35 PM  
That's great and all, but when are we gonna get a thread about the 10 signs of Alzheimer's disease?
 
2013-05-29 03:26:50 PM  
I'll make fun of just about anything but not Alzheimer's Disease. It scares the shiat out of me that it might happen to my mom. If it happens to me I'll just blow my brains out but I don't have what it takes to deal with it happening to my mom. So far she's fine but damn.
 
2013-05-29 04:19:04 PM  

born_yesterday: That's great and all, but when are we gonna get a thread about the 10 signs of Alzheimer's disease?


I moseyed into this thread wondering what was going on and now I'm lost.
 
2013-05-29 05:01:15 PM  

born_yesterday: That's great and all, but when are we gonna get a thread about the 10 signs of Alzheimer's disease?


Hopefully around the same time we get a thread about the 10 signs of Alzheimer's disease
 
2013-05-29 05:02:18 PM  
Done in seven.
 
2013-05-29 05:02:44 PM  

"2. Look for patterns."


So this means half the Farkers in the Politics thread who are trolls are really coming down with Alzheimers.

 
2013-05-29 05:05:15 PM  
4. Not every case is the same.
There are general warning signs of Alzheimer's disease, but not everyone exhibits the same ones or at the same time in the progression of the illness. In addition, some individuals with the disease manage to cover up symptoms: for example, they might hide behind jokes or disinterest.
 Excellent, so one of the "Signs of Alzheimer's Disease" is not showing symptoms.
 
2013-05-29 05:06:02 PM  
Well I loved her in that show but after the scandal in Boise I'm just not interested. The pickles were good, though.
 
2013-05-29 05:06:45 PM  

Mugato: I'll make fun of just about anything but not Alzheimer's Disease. It scares the shiat out of me that it might happen to my mom. If it happens to me I'll just blow my brains out but I don't have what it takes to deal with it happening to my mom. So far she's fine but damn.


I am currently taking care of my Mother and it is a royal pain. She is at the moderate to severe stage. Almost no short term memory and verbal skills are limited as she can't find the right words to hold a conversation or to express what she is trying to say.

If your Mom has it i do feel for you. It is one of those rare disease I feel you hope it goes down hill quickly and ends.
 
2013-05-29 05:10:15 PM  
Hmmm. Helpful information.
 
2013-05-29 05:13:46 PM  
Dude, where's my car?
 
2013-05-29 05:15:53 PM  
It is scary, but can be funny when you're at the point when all you can do is laugh. One grandma had Alzheimer's for ten years before she passed. My other grandma currently has a certain type if dementia, she sees people that are not there. Brought her food and she asked if I brought any for "that guy". Super weird.
 
2013-05-29 05:17:01 PM  

skinink: "2. Look for patterns."


Not only that, but you should look for repetition, patterns, and repetition.
 
2013-05-29 05:18:22 PM  
Why do I have a belt tied to my onion?
 
2013-05-29 05:18:24 PM  
I was told there would be pudding.
 
2013-05-29 05:18:55 PM  
My Grandma has it and it's so hard to see her like that.  Last time I saw her she seemed better than before.  It's just heartbreaking, especially if they are frightened or crying.
 
2013-05-29 05:19:57 PM  

Waldo Pepper: I am currently taking care of my Mother and it is a royal pain. She is at the moderate to severe stage. Almost no short term memory and verbal skills are limited as she can't find the right words to hold a conversation or to express what she is trying to say.


My mom doesn't have any signs of it, it's just something I worry about. And God bless your mom because it's a horrific thing to deal with. If I die of liver failure it'll be because I deserve it but no one deserves to suffer from Alzheimer's.
 
2013-05-29 05:20:10 PM  

i upped my meds-up yours: skinink: "2. Look for patterns."

Not only that, but you should look for repetition, patterns, and repetition.


Like this article being reposted to the main page 5 more times this week?
 
2013-05-29 05:21:03 PM  
Hmmm. That's some helpful information.
 
2013-05-29 05:22:03 PM  
At least I don't have cancer.
 
2013-05-29 05:22:31 PM  
This thread is funny then sad and then funny and then sad.  I hope we have one about Alzheimer's soon because those threads are usually the same way.
 
2013-05-29 05:25:36 PM  
How do those signs differ from dementia caused by long term alcoholism?
 
2013-05-29 05:26:09 PM  

Vangor: 4. Not every case is the same.
There are general warning signs of Alzheimer's disease, but not everyone exhibits the same ones or at the same time in the progression of the illness. In addition, some individuals with the disease manage to cover up symptoms: for example, they might hide behind jokes or disinterest.



Excellent, so one of the "Signs of Alzheimer's Disease" is not showing symptoms.

That's the worst symptom, get to a doctor, stat!  Justus kidding.

CSB

I had a sinus infection years ago and couldn't get in to see my regular doctor, so they scheduled me with the resident quack.  Didn't know that at the time until a friend at work told me more about him after my visit with him.  Anyway, during the visit he told me that we all have the genes for every known ill to man, but it's how we live our lives as to whether or not we trigger those genes into action.  He then went on to say that people basically choose to get Cancer, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and a few others I can't remember.  It's all a choice.  I asked him about kids born with diseases like MS, Cancer, Downs, and such, how did they choose that.  He said the parents must have done that for them somehow.  I took my prescription for guaifenesin (this was back before it was OTC), and got out before he could bombard me with any more insanity   A few years later the guy had a breakdown, and is no longer practicing medicine.  Couldn't will himself away from the inevitable I guess.

/CSB
 
2013-05-29 05:26:31 PM  

i upped my meds-up yours: skinink: "2. Look for patterns."

Not only that, but you should look for repetition, patterns, and repetition.


You said repetition 5 times.
 
2013-05-29 05:27:39 PM  
It is scary, but can be funny when you're at the point when all you can do is laugh. One grandma had Alzheimer's for ten years before she passed. My other grandma currently has a certain type if dementia, she sees people that are not there. Brought her food and she asked if I brought any for "that guy". Super weird.
 
2013-05-29 05:28:37 PM  
Fark this farking disease right in its farking face.

FTFA: Common cognitive symptoms include: [list shortened]

problems with verbal communication such as not finding the right words or repeating things

confusion about time, place or people
lack of judgment
difficulty performing familiar, pre-programmed tasks like dressing or bathing

These ones are, for me, the most frustrating aspects of dealing with an Alzheimer's patient. My grandmother gets caught in these mental loops. Part of her brain wants to talk about a subject, so she says something or asks a question. However, the part of her brain that actually processes and remembers the reply doesn't work, so she hears it, then literally seconds later forgets that she heard it. Also, since it's the same part of her brain that processes and remembers that she said/asked her statement in the first place, she has no idea she said it 10 seconds previously. So, conversations with her go like this:

Grandma: I've lived in this house a while now, haven't I?
Me: You moved here in... 1999 I think.
Grandma: Well, I just love it. This neighborhood is so nice, and so close to everything. Nobody moves in to [her old neighborhood] anymore, it's so expensive and crowded.
Me: Yeah, this is a nice town.
Grandma: Isn't it? It's so close to everything. I just love it.
Me: Yeah.
Grandma: I mean, nobody moves in to [her old neighborhood] anymore. It's so expensive and crowded there.

And this will go on for the next several minutes until another subject pops into her head.

I saw her over Memorial Day weekend. She addressed the cat food dish as if it were her cat, literally looking at it and saying "Jinx, where are you going?" before rinsing it off in the sink. Along those lines, she never washes anything, either (herself included, unless monitored). She only rinses things -- we likely think that her mind interprets the running water as "I must have washed, because I'm rinsing something now," so she sees it and moves on. My parents (her caretakers) have to keep a close monitor on the dish cupboards, because if Grandma sees a dirty dish anywhere, she'll run a little bit of water on it, then put it directly away.

She refuses to eat anything but sweets unless nagged. If she has to be left unattended for any reason, she'll usually wander down the street to buy ice cream and cookies from the drugstore, then eat them all before coming home. Left to her own devices, she will sit on her bed all day with her cat, watching TV.

She is starting to confuse me with her own son (we do not look or sound anything alike).

She will interchangeably refer to any person as both "he" and "she."

She does not remember the names of old friends.

She refers to my in-utero child as "the cat."

Fark this farking disease right in its farking face.
 
2013-05-29 05:32:23 PM  

bedtundy: Vangor: 4. Not every case is the same.
There are general warning signs of Alzheimer's disease, but not everyone exhibits the same ones or at the same time in the progression of the illness. In addition, some individuals with the disease manage to cover up symptoms: for example, they might hide behind jokes or disinterest.


Excellent, so one of the "Signs of Alzheimer's Disease" is not showing symptoms.

That's the worst symptom, get to a doctor, stat!  Justus kidding.

CSB

I had a sinus infection years ago and couldn't get in to see my regular doctor, so they scheduled me with the resident quack.  Didn't know that at the time until a friend at work told me more about him after my visit with him.  Anyway, during the visit he told me that we all have the genes for every known ill to man, but it's how we live our lives as to whether or not we trigger those genes into action.  He then went on to say that people basically choose to get Cancer, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and a few others I can't remember.  It's all a choice.  I asked him about kids born with diseases like MS, Cancer, Downs, and such, how did they choose that.  He said the parents must have done that for them somehow.  I took my prescription for guaifenesin (this was back before it was OTC), and got out before he could bombard me with any more insanity   A few years later the guy had a breakdown, and is no longer practicing medicine.  Couldn't will himself away from the inevitable I guess.

/CSB


He obviously chose to have a breakdown.
 
2013-05-29 05:40:26 PM  
Mugato : If it happens to me I'll just blow my brains out

Don't do that.

Just sit back, relax, and forget about your troubles.
 
2013-05-29 05:42:55 PM  
My mother has Parkinson's and Alzheimer's.   her Parkinson's is traced to starting immediately after a knee replacement.   Of course you can't choose to get it, but it seems that with other neurological illnesses, there *might* be triggers.
 
2013-05-29 05:43:17 PM  
expressing false beliefs...

So everyone who supports organized religion has Alzheimers?

/themoreyouknow.jpg
 
2013-05-29 05:43:58 PM  
My grandmother suffered a long slow death from Alzheimers and finally passed away at the age of 85 in 2005.  The first sign was when she started to forget the rules to pinochle a game she had been playing like a pro since World War 2.  She slowley lost any orientation to the world around her.  She couldn't remember what year it was, how old she was.  She couldn't recognize anyone.   She could still could recall a lot of her past, but she couldn't remember what sequence those memories went in or which one was the most current.  She could be lucid one minute and then the next think she was 12 years old and that my Dad was her old boyfriend.

But the worse part about Alzheimers that they don't really prepare you for, is how angry and frustrated she would get.  For her, however she was currently percieving the world was her reality and when the world didn't work or react to her perceptions she would lash out.  She would get so angry and take it out on the people and things around her.

And my poor Grandfather, he refused to put her in a home (they had been married since 1947), and he took care of her until she died.  The stress of taking care of her made him into a shadow of the man he was, so that when they discovered he had lung cancer he was so underweight that they couldn't perform any kind of chemo or radiation treatment on him.  He died a year after she did.
 
2013-05-29 05:46:20 PM  

Waldo Pepper: Mugato: I'll make fun of just about anything but not Alzheimer's Disease. It scares the shiat out of me that it might happen to my mom. If it happens to me I'll just blow my brains out but I don't have what it takes to deal with it happening to my mom. So far she's fine but damn.

I am currently taking care of my Mother and it is a royal pain. She is at the moderate to severe stage. Almost no short term memory and verbal skills are limited as she can't find the right words to hold a conversation or to express what she is trying to say.

If your Mom has it i do feel for you. It is one of those rare disease I feel you hope it goes down hill quickly and ends.


ALS killed my grandfather and Alzheimer's an aunt and uncle. I helped care for all three and I deeply empathize with anyone dealing with either horrific disease. Until you've seen these things happen to people you really just don't know how terrible they really are.

That said, this thread was done in one.
 
2013-05-29 05:46:49 PM  

BKITU: Fark this farking disease right in its farking face.

FTFA: Common cognitive symptoms include: [list shortened]

problems with verbal communication such as not finding the right words or repeating things

confusion about time, place or people
lack of judgment
difficulty performing familiar, pre-programmed tasks like dressing or bathing

These ones are, for me, the most frustrating aspects of dealing with an Alzheimer's patient. My grandmother gets caught in these mental loops. Part of her brain wants to talk about a subject, so she says something or asks a question. However, the part of her brain that actually processes and remembers the reply doesn't work, so she hears it, then literally seconds later forgets that she heard it. Also, since it's the same part of her brain that processes and remembers that she said/asked her statement in the first place, she has no idea she said it 10 seconds previously. So, conversations with her go like this:

Grandma: I've lived in this house a while now, haven't I?
Me: You moved here in... 1999 I think.
Grandma: Well, I just love it. This neighborhood is so nice, and so close to everything. Nobody moves in to [her old neighborhood] anymore, it's so expensive and crowded.
Me: Yeah, this is a nice town.
Grandma: Isn't it? It's so close to everything. I just love it.
Me: Yeah.
Grandma: I mean, nobody moves in to [her old neighborhood] anymore. It's so expensive and crowded there.

And this will go on for the next several minutes until another subject pops into her head.

I saw her over Memorial Day weekend. She addressed the cat food dish as if it were her cat, literally looking at it and saying "Jinx, where are you going?" before rinsing it off in the sink. Along those lines, she never washes anything, either (herself included, unless monitored). She only rinses things -- we likely think that her mind interprets the running water as "I must have washed, because I'm rinsing something now," so she sees it and moves on. My parents (he ...


My Mom eats a lot of sweets. She loves soda (which she never did before) and I've watched her add honey to her soda. Ice cream and cookies for breakfast.  The rising off dishes also happens here. I usually catch her but if not I have to go back and rewash whatever she "washed".  Showers and washing hair is a major issue.

I gave up everything and moved to another state so my Mom could live in her house and dang if she doesn't start to pack up and tells me she wants to go home. She can't tell me where is home.  I don't think she knows who I am most of the time.

Now here is the kicker. I got my mother a dog and it amazes me that she can find the right words when talking to the dog and remembers his name without me reminding her.

there are some advantages. She can watch the same movie or program over and over without thinking she has already seen it.

you soon learn it is okay and usually necessary to lie from time to time to handle issues that come up.
 
2013-05-29 05:47:09 PM  

BKITU: She refers to my in-utero child as "the cat."


Now that's funny. Are you sure her mind is going and she doesn't just have an awesome sense of humor and no more farks to give?
 
2013-05-29 05:47:12 PM  
Something no one mentions is that a routine infection in an elderly person can manifest as severe dementia.  My mother started getting bladder infections last year and it was scary as fark to see what a mild infection could do to her mind.  She hallucinated, refused to believe anything she was told, couldn't name basic household items.

A few days on IV antibiotics and she was fine.  Didn't remember a single thing about having been sick.
 
2013-05-29 05:47:27 PM  

FTFA:

[W]hile Alzheimer's disease typically strikes people 65 and older, a rarer form of the disease, known as young-onset or early-onset Alzheimer's disease, presents in people as young as in their 30s and 40s.
Uh-huh. Going over the Cognitive and Behavioral symptoms list I should probably start looking onto finding a nice Home before I really need one. When more wacky Boomers die off my prospects will improve.In other words, I'm doomed.
 
2013-05-29 05:48:16 PM  
my grandmother has alzheimers and so might my mom.  they say it's hereditary, but i'm not sure.

also, my grandmother has alzheimers and so might my mom.  they say it's hereditary, but i'm not sure.
 
2013-05-29 05:51:19 PM  

skinink: So this means half the Farkers in the Politics thread who are trolls are really coming down with Alzheimers.


Well, sure.  If it was good enough for St. Ronald, by God it's good enough for them.
 
2013-05-29 05:51:56 PM  

Dr.Fey: How do those signs differ from dementia caused by long term alcoholism?


They can put you through a CT scan and find out which bits are shrivelling. That's how we know that my grandna has MID, not Alzheimer's
 
2013-05-29 05:53:57 PM  

Jeremysbrain: My grandmother suffered a long slow death from Alzheimers and finally passed away at the age of 85 in 2005.  The first sign was when she started to forget the rules to pinochle a game she had been playing like a pro since World War 2.  She slowley lost any orientation to the world around her.  She couldn't remember what year it was, how old she was.  She couldn't recognize anyone.   She could still could recall a lot of her past, but she couldn't remember what sequence those memories went in or which one was the most current.  She could be lucid one minute and then the next think she was 12 years old and that my Dad was her old boyfriend.

But the worse part about Alzheimers that they don't really prepare you for, is how angry and frustrated she would get.  For her, however she was currently percieving the world was her reality and when the world didn't work or react to her perceptions she would lash out.  She would get so angry and take it out on the people and things around her.

And my poor Grandfather, he refused to put her in a home (they had been married since 1947), and he took care of her until she died.  The stress of taking care of her made him into a shadow of the man he was, so that when they discovered he had lung cancer he was so underweight that they couldn't perform any kind of chemo or radiation treatment on him.  He died a year after she did.


I read somewhere that those who are the caretakers of Alzheimers folks have a greater chance of coming down with it.

One of the worst things is that I do it on a daily basis by myself and there is little to no conversation and it is near impossible to get away by myself for longer then at best an hour and impossible forget anything at night.

I've noticed that evening/night bring on worries in my mother and if I take the dog for a walk when it is dark she will keep checking out the door or looking out the window neither of these things when I walk the dog during the day.
 
2013-05-29 05:54:56 PM  

missmez: Something no one mentions is that a routine infection in an elderly person can manifest as severe dementia.  My mother started getting bladder infections last year and it was scary as fark to see what a mild infection could do to her mind.  She hallucinated, refused to believe anything she was told, couldn't name basic household items.

A few days on IV antibiotics and she was fine.  Didn't remember a single thing about having been sick.


have her take cranberry supplements, they work wonders for my Mom who was suffering with the same issue
 
2013-05-29 05:55:17 PM  

A Shambling Mound: Waldo Pepper: Mugato: I'll make fun of just about anything but not Alzheimer's Disease. It scares the shiat out of me that it might happen to my mom. If it happens to me I'll just blow my brains out but I don't have what it takes to deal with it happening to my mom. So far she's fine but damn.

I am currently taking care of my Mother and it is a royal pain. She is at the moderate to severe stage. Almost no short term memory and verbal skills are limited as she can't find the right words to hold a conversation or to express what she is trying to say.

If your Mom has it i do feel for you. It is one of those rare disease I feel you hope it goes down hill quickly and ends.

ALS killed my grandfather and Alzheimer's an aunt and uncle. I helped care for all three and I deeply empathize with anyone dealing with either horrific disease. Until you've seen these things happen to people you really just don't know how terrible they really are.

That said, this thread was done in one.


ALS is pretty bad.  Sorry for your loss.  I've seen two people taken that way.  Neighbor a few houses down has it now, the guy used to be an awesome guitar player.  Now, he can't even hold a guitar.  He can still kind of walk, and has some limited control, but I don't think he has much longer to live.  He's horribly depressed and just wants to die.  ALS seems worse to me, you're aware of what's happening to you.  Sad and scary way to go.
 
2013-05-29 05:58:22 PM  
Watched my grandmother slowly and progressively suffer from it as a teen.
I don't think I'll be able to handle it if my mother develops it.
Farking horrible disease.
 
2013-05-29 06:00:56 PM  

Jeremysbrain: My grandmother suffered a long slow death from Alzheimers and finally passed away at the age of 85 in 2005.  The first sign was when she started to forget the rules to pinochle a game she had been playing like a pro since World War 2.  She slowley lost any orientation to the world around her.  She couldn't remember what year it was, how old she was.  She couldn't recognize anyone.   She could still could recall a lot of her past, but she couldn't remember what sequence those memories went in or which one was the most current.  She could be lucid one minute and then the next think she was 12 years old and that my Dad was her old boyfriend.

But the worse part about Alzheimers that they don't really prepare you for, is how angry and frustrated she would get.  For her, however she was currently percieving the world was her reality and when the world didn't work or react to her perceptions she would lash out.  She would get so angry and take it out on the people and things around her.

And my poor Grandfather, he refused to put her in a home (they had been married since 1947), and he took care of her until she died.  The stress of taking care of her made him into a shadow of the man he was, so that when they discovered he had lung cancer he was so underweight that they couldn't perform any kind of chemo or radiation treatment on him.  He died a year after she did.


How sad.  How long did your Grandmother suffer with Alzheimer's?
 
2013-05-29 06:01:58 PM  

bedtundy: A Shambling Mound: Waldo Pepper: Mugato: I'll make fun of just about anything but not Alzheimer's Disease. It scares the shiat out of me that it might happen to my mom. If it happens to me I'll just blow my brains out but I don't have what it takes to deal with it happening to my mom. So far she's fine but damn.

I am currently taking care of my Mother and it is a royal pain. She is at the moderate to severe stage. Almost no short term memory and verbal skills are limited as she can't find the right words to hold a conversation or to express what she is trying to say.

If your Mom has it i do feel for you. It is one of those rare disease I feel you hope it goes down hill quickly and ends.

ALS killed my grandfather and Alzheimer's an aunt and uncle. I helped care for all three and I deeply empathize with anyone dealing with either horrific disease. Until you've seen these things happen to people you really just don't know how terrible they really are.

That said, this thread was done in one.

ALS is pretty bad.  Sorry for your loss.  I've seen two people taken that way.  Neighbor a few houses down has it now, the guy used to be an awesome guitar player.  Now, he can't even hold a guitar.  He can still kind of walk, and has some limited control, but I don't think he has much longer to live.  He's horribly depressed and just wants to die.  ALS seems worse to me, you're aware of what's happening to you.  Sad and scary way to go.


I used to think the same but now I'm not so sure. There are moments when I guess things click just right in my Mom's brain and she has this worried look on her face and she will say something like "i don't know whats wrong with me." and start to cry, this usually doesn't last long and she soon is back to her ice cream or cookie but those moments of worry can't be good.
 
2013-05-29 06:03:13 PM  

Waldo Pepper: I gave up everything and moved to another state so my Mom could live in her house and dang if she doesn't start to pack up and tells me she wants to go home. She can't tell me where is home.  I don't think she knows who I am most of the time.


I did this too.  Mom doesn't have AD but has moderate dementia.  Nearly every day is a fight to keep her from doing something irrational.  She can barely walk but rails about having her drivers license taken away on a daily basis (she drove up the library steps in front of a cop).  She insists on sweets even though she has diabetes.  She won't tolerate her laundry being wrinkled but must be forced to wash herself.

you soon learn it is okay and usually necessary to lie from time to time to handle issues that come up.

Oh hell, that's the fun part.  So much of what mom says is nonsensical that I just respond nonsensically rather than dispute her.  Sometimes she catches it and rolls her eyes at me, other times she goes with it.
 
2013-05-29 06:05:28 PM  

Lurk sober post drunk: Watched my grandmother slowly and progressively suffer from it as a teen.
I don't think I'll be able to handle it if my mother develops it.
Farking horrible disease.


Very sorry. it is a horrid thing that slowly decimates the mind and body over time. different people, different torture. Mother Nature is a biatch mistress and she can kiss my stank ass.
 
2013-05-29 06:06:35 PM  
SirOsisofLyvre:

My mother has Parkinson's and Alzheimer's.

RUN.
 
2013-05-29 06:06:52 PM  
This warpaint smells like shiat.
 
2013-05-29 06:09:54 PM  

Mugato: I'll make fun of just about anything but not Alzheimer's Disease. It scares the shiat out of me that it might happen to my mom. If it happens to me I'll just blow my brains out but I don't have what it takes to deal with it happening to my mom. So far she's fine but damn.


THIS
 
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