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(Newser)   Some 121 years after the Coal Creek War broke out, Tennessee has officially declared an end to hostilities with coal miners enraged by the use of convict labor to replace free workers. A peace treaty has been signed   (newser.com) divider line 21
    More: Strange, Coal Creek War, coal miners enraged, hostilities, convict labor, National Register of Historic Places, rebellions, coal mining, workers  
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4492 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 May 2013 at 12:24 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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Archived thread
2013-05-27 11:28:44 AM
5 votes:
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coal_Cr eek_War

Fascinating like a train wreck, the lengths the American "captains of industry" went to against their own workers.
2013-05-27 12:26:52 PM
4 votes:

Therion: http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coal_Cr eek_War

Fascinating like a train wreck, the lengths the American "captains of industry" went to against their own workers.


Amazing, isn't it? The history of violence between "Captains of Industry" (with US Government military support) versus underpaid, ill treated workers is impressive. But, you know, Unions are bad.
2013-05-27 02:09:43 PM
3 votes:
There's only been one conspiracy in the entire history of the human race.  It's basically the 1% who own 99% of everything.  They don't stand 1000' tall and breathe atomic flames; they just know how to manipulate social institutions like organized religion to their advantage.  The one institution that they use most to maintain their power is parenthood; throughout most of human history, the J.P. Morgans of the world could always count on the poor to be an inexhaustible source of cheap labor and cannon fodder no matter how much you exploited and enslaved them.  Show me a guy who'll work in a coal mine for a dollar a day, and I'll show you some guy who has a wife and eight starving kids back home in a tin-roofed shack.

About the biggest news item that's being more-or-less systematically ignored by Big Media is the plummeting birth rates around the world.  Industrialized countries like Germany and South Korea already have fertility rates around 1.4 which is well below the replacement rate of 2.1 kids per woman.  Even third-world places like Iran and Brazil have seen their birth rates fall dramatically over the last decade or so.  America has recently fallen below 2.1 kids per woman and that's with a huge influx of immigrants from pro-natalist countries like Somalia and Mexico.

Personally, I think this is a good thing.  Without going into a long rant, I think this is the one Peasant's Revolt that might actually work...
2013-05-27 12:47:07 PM
3 votes:

DeathByGeekSquad: I've always found the willingness to blindly support the purported underdog to be fascinating.


The willingness to blindly support the factual overdog is so commonplace as to need no discussion.
2013-05-27 04:48:02 PM
2 votes:

Bender The Offender: Hey now, they lost $7,000 in a class action suit from the workers' families. Of course, the owners received.a $64,000 settlement from insurance to help offset the ruthless oppression of their dead workers. You are correct about them being cited a few years later for the exact same thing. As an added bonus, these poor oppressed job creators also had rules that led to employee fines for things such as "bathroom breaks", and "turning off machines to unjam them instead of getting your hand ripped off". Yes, those poor oppressed paragons of virtue (sarcasm directed at the dumb asses who think the poor were oppressing the wealthy, not you).


Wow, those guys were even more evil than I thought.  Seven thousand?  That divided among the over 100 families might be enough money to buy a cheap pine casket.  IIRC, the Triangle fire did help seamstresses organize into unions, so maybe something good came about it after all.

BTW, I have the same contempt that you have for the idiots who think that the poor oppress the rich.  That's why revolutions fail almost always--there's plenty of stupid corporate tools who will gladly throw away their lives to protect their right to getting screwed by the Man.  Just give them a spiffy new uniform, tell them that they're superior in some vague way, and *voila* you have an army of Pinkerton men who will shed blood for J.P. Morgan...
2013-05-27 02:18:04 PM
2 votes:

LordJiro: Therion: http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coal_Cr eek_War

Fascinating like a train wreck, the lengths the American "captains of industry" went to against their own workers.

Yep. Like letting a sheriff and his posse shoot numerous unarmed miners in the back, then get away without so much as a slap on the wrist.

But the modern-day  robber barons Job Creators™ would never do anything like that, given the chance!


IIRC, the owners of the Triangle Shirtwaist Company never spent a minute in prison for violating numerous fire codes.  In fact, there was a safety inspection of some sweatshop owned by the Triangle owners several years later, and they were still padlocking fire escapes in direct violation of the law.

Again, not having kids is a very good way to minimize being exploited by the Man, man...
2013-05-27 01:29:36 PM
2 votes:

buzzcut73: As I said in another thread yesterday, it's great to know that both parties (led by the R's, but the other is just as bought and paid for) are leading us back to those good old days . Hell, some states are already leasing convict labor to private industry again.


basementrejects.com
2013-05-27 12:47:41 PM
2 votes:
FTA: "Republican state senator, who donned a green bandana like those worn by the striking miners."

Always supporting the workers.
2013-05-27 10:53:05 PM
1 votes:
It's fascinating how the toothless inbred hillbillies of one thread are the noble downtrodden workers of another.
2013-05-27 02:12:59 PM
1 votes:

Therion: http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coal_Cr eek_War

Fascinating like a train wreck, the lengths the American "captains of industry" went to against their own workers.


Yep. Like letting a sheriff and his posse shoot numerous unarmed miners in the back, then get away without so much as a slap on the wrist.

But the modern-day  robber barons Job Creators™ would never do anything like that, given the chance!
2013-05-27 01:55:14 PM
1 votes:
Wouldn't surprise me if we saw this sort of thing again in another 10-20 years.
2013-05-27 01:39:28 PM
1 votes:

meyerkev: trotsky: Therion: http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coal_Cr eek_War

Fascinating like a train wreck, the lengths the American "captains of industry" went to against their own workers.

Amazing, isn't it? The history of violence between "Captains of Industry" (with US Government military support) versus underpaid, ill treated workers is impressive. But, you know, Unions are bad.

And from another perspective, things don't look so bad today.

It's just like people saying "Wow, political discourse in Congress is really bad these days.  It's almost like the leadup to the Civil War".  And I go: "Has a Senator beat another senator into a coma on the floor of the Senate yet?" and they go "No."  and I go "Ok, I'll be worried when they do."


And don't forget the classless sacks of shiat that called themselves "gentlemen" that sent Preston Brooks new canes, while Charles Sumner spent three years recovering (partially, he never fully recovered) from traumatic brain injury.

Honestly, if such an incident took place today, I would expect nothing less from that sliver of our society.
2013-05-27 01:34:08 PM
1 votes:

fanbladesaresharp: buzzcut73: Therion: http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coal_Cr eek_War

Fascinating like a train wreck, the lengths the American "captains of industry" went to against their own workers.

As I said in another thread yesterday, it's great to know that both parties (led by the R's, but the other is just as bought and paid for) are leading us back to those good old days . Hell, some states are already leasing convict labor to private industry again.

I, for one, can't wait to live in a company town. Close to work, there's a store nearby, the company is more profitable because they can buy supplies for me using their superior buying poer (which I get in exchange for coupons they give me for my work), what's not to like!

Umm about that. Company towns aren't quite as romantic as you might hope. I've lived next to lumber and mining ones on the west coast growing up. Sure the pay can be top dollar, but so is everything else in town. The money becomes its own closed loop of sorts, and your whole livelihood is dependent on the success of the company. If it goes broke, so could you. Major services like hospitals for anything beyond a broken thumb is a two hour drive. If you're in the sticks off the highway or interstates, bad weather can cause road washouts and you're cut off from civilization. Then you have to worry about strikes (where you won't be paid for) if your union doesn't like the management, and so on..

I know that appeals to a lot of folks, and some I've known for years, but you wouldn't want to be that guy that says "fark this" and just uproots a life in NYC or LA and that little lifestyle change doesn't pan out so well.


Mind you, that describes a lot of non-company towns too.  If you're making less than $100K in Silicon Valley, you either have roommates, live in a slum or are blowing half your takehome on rent.

/Or have a hour and a half plus commute from the East Bay, where prices are saner (Emphasis on the er)
//I don't get why we can't spend money on infrastructure around here.
2013-05-27 01:26:17 PM
1 votes:

fanbladesaresharp: buzzcut73: Therion: http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coal_Cr eek_War

Fascinating like a train wreck, the lengths the American "captains of industry" went to against their own workers.

As I said in another thread yesterday, it's great to know that both parties (led by the R's, but the other is just as bought and paid for) are leading us back to those good old days . Hell, some states are already leasing convict labor to private industry again.

I, for one, can't wait to live in a company town. Close to work, there's a store nearby, the company is more profitable because they can buy supplies for me using their superior buying poer (which I get in exchange for coupons they give me for my work), what's not to like!

Umm about that. Company towns aren't quite as romantic as you might hope. I've lived next to lumber and mining ones on the west coast growing up. Sure the pay can be top dollar, but so is everything else in town. The money becomes its own closed loop of sorts, and your whole livelihood is dependent on the success of the company. If it goes broke, so could you. Major services like hospitals for anything beyond a broken thumb is a two hour drive. If you're in the sticks off the highway or interstates, bad weather can cause road washouts and you're cut off from civilization. Then you have to worry about strikes (where you won't be paid for) if your union doesn't like the management, and so on..

I know that appeals to a lot of folks, and some I've known for years, but you wouldn't want to be that guy that says "fark this" and just uproots a life in NYC or LA and that little lifestyle change doesn't pan out so well.


Somebody's sarcasm detector is acting up today.
2013-05-27 01:23:35 PM
1 votes:

meyerkev: "Has a Senator beat another senator into a coma on the floor of the Senate yet?" and they go "No."  and I go "Ok, I'll be worried start watching C-Span for the entertainment value when they do."


ftfy
2013-05-27 01:21:14 PM
1 votes:
Not the first time Tennesseans have taken up arms when they thought they have been wronged look at The battle of Athens or the State of Scott
2013-05-27 01:18:18 PM
1 votes:

buzzcut73: Therion: http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coal_Cr eek_War

Fascinating like a train wreck, the lengths the American "captains of industry" went to against their own workers.

As I said in another thread yesterday, it's great to know that both parties (led by the R's, but the other is just as bought and paid for) are leading us back to those good old days . Hell, some states are already leasing convict labor to private industry again.

I, for one, can't wait to live in a company town. Close to work, there's a store nearby, the company is more profitable because they can buy supplies for me using their superior buying poer (which I get in exchange for coupons they give me for my work), what's not to like!


Umm about that. Company towns aren't quite as romantic as you might hope. I've lived next to lumber and mining ones on the west coast growing up. Sure the pay can be top dollar, but so is everything else in town. The money becomes its own closed loop of sorts, and your whole livelihood is dependent on the success of the company. If it goes broke, so could you. Major services like hospitals for anything beyond a broken thumb is a two hour drive. If you're in the sticks off the highway or interstates, bad weather can cause road washouts and you're cut off from civilization. Then you have to worry about strikes (where you won't be paid for) if your union doesn't like the management, and so on..

I know that appeals to a lot of folks, and some I've known for years, but you wouldn't want to be that guy that says "fark this" and just uproots a life in NYC or LA and that little lifestyle change doesn't pan out so well.
2013-05-27 01:08:54 PM
1 votes:
the insurrection, which led to an end of the state's convict-leasing system

Hey liberals, tell me again how violence never works.


DeathByGeekSquad
I've always found the willingness to blindly support the purported underdog to be fascinating.

The weak are, by definition, never the oppressors.
2013-05-27 12:49:55 PM
1 votes:

MorteDiem: FTA: "Republican state senator, who donned a green bandana like those worn by the striking miners."

Always supporting the workers.


Redneck came from a 1912 coal riot. The union coal miners wore red bandanas around their necks. Supposedly.
2013-05-27 12:45:16 PM
1 votes:
img1-cdn.newser.com
2013-05-27 12:37:37 PM
1 votes:

Therion: http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coal_Cr eek_War

Fascinating like a train wreck, the lengths the American "captains of industry" went to against their own workers.


As I said in another thread yesterday, it's great to know that both parties (led by the R's, but the other is just as bought and paid for) are leading us back to those good old days . Hell, some states are already leasing convict labor to private industry again.

I, for one, can't wait to live in a company town. Close to work, there's a store nearby, the company is more profitable because they can buy supplies for me using their superior buying poer (which I get in exchange for coupons they give me for my work), what's not to like!
 
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