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(ABC)   Helicopter parenting rises to new altitudes: "Redshirting" kids at kindergarten so they are bigger, better at sports, and more academically adept than their peers   (abcnews.go.com) divider line 43
    More: Fail, helicopter parenting, preschool teacher, National Center for Education Statistics, tenth grade, kindergartens  
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16025 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 May 2013 at 9:59 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-27 07:50:46 AM  
5 votes:
I've seen that show, it never ends well for the guy in the red shirt.
2013-05-27 07:59:39 AM  
4 votes:
Parents have been doing this for decades. If you know your child is not ready for Kindergarten, don't enroll them.
2013-05-27 09:48:01 AM  
3 votes:
Got sent to Kindergarten at four, graduated high school at 17, college at 21.

Shockingly being able to kick a kickball a shorter distance in recess in 2nd grade than my classmates hasn't been brought up by any employers.
2013-05-27 08:20:31 AM  
3 votes:

simplicimus: Parents have been doing this for decades. If you know your child is not ready for Kindergarten, don't enroll them.


Yeah.  My neighbors did this with their two sons 40 years ago.

Doing it for sports is asshattery, but for emotional/social/educational reasons, I think it's valid.
2013-05-27 02:08:57 PM  
2 votes:
Yeah, I love these kids.  They are turds, so their parents don't let them start kindergarten til they are 6 and they turn 7 before the end of the year.  So my kid, who is extremely smart, starts kindergarten at 4 and has to deal with Gigantor who is dumb, and a turd, is 12 inches taller and has 30 pounds on my kid.  When my kid started 2nd grade there was one kid going into kindergarten older than him.

If EVERYONE red shirted, there would be no more perceived advantage, which is why society decided, "kids start school at 5."  Reshirting parents are cowards and raise turds.
2013-05-27 12:14:13 PM  
2 votes:

simplicimus: Parents have been doing this for decades. If you know your child is not ready for Kindergarten, don't enroll them.


My daughter's kindergarten class is populated with red-shirted kids.  I'll even go as far as to say that the MAJORITY of students in her class were red-shirted.  She's she second youngest child in her class, having turned 5 at the end of last summer.  During this academic year, a couple kids even turned 7 years old.  Most of the kids turned 6 during the school year.

7 year olds should not be in kindergarten with 5 year olds.

These red-shirted kids are developmentally delayed or anything.  They come from well-heeled families who want their kids to have every possible advantage.
2013-05-27 11:42:25 AM  
2 votes:
My parents technically put me into school a year early (my birthday was in mid-August) and despite excelling academically, the schools would always try to hold me back a year because I was younger than all the other kids.

The fact that they wanted to hold me back for something as stupid as my age upset me--particularly since I had passed the year before with straight As, so there was no GOOD reason to hold me back. Thankfully, my parents fought for me, so I never was held back, but the memory of that laid the foundations for me to become quite the cynic.

"Why should I work hard? Those jerk administrators will just try to keep me behind for my age anyways. Why should I care that the other kids are older than me? Those other kids are stupid and I do not care what they think." X-D
2013-05-27 10:59:58 AM  
2 votes:

Mouser: From TFA:

Redshirting poses challenges not only to children but to teachers and parents.

"The teacher is mostly impacted by it. They are dealing with children of ages ranging between four and a half and six and a half. This is a large developmental gap when trying to get through the state standard curricula," said Vela.

Isn't the problem here not the differing ages, but that the kids are being taught to a state standard curricula?


No, it's the differing ages. Let's say their was no standard curriculum. That the teacher got to decide for themselves what the roomful of children in front of them should learn. The developmental gap would still cause issues because you have one teacher trying to teach many children across a range of ages the same thing at the same time. Whether the thing being taught is the state curriculum or whatever Cletus Q farkstick comes up with, teaching a 4 1/2 year old and a 6 1/2 year old the same thing at the same time will be trouble.
2013-05-27 10:06:56 AM  
2 votes:
More parents are putting off a child's kindergarten entry so he or she will be a little older than the classmates. It's a phenomenon known as redshirting.

When I was a kid, it was called "being held back a grade." The rest of the kids just assumed you were a moron who couldn't handle finger painting and was probably going to eat all the paste.
2013-05-27 10:39:21 PM  
1 votes:

Anthracite: My soon to be 6 yr old starts Kindergarten this fall. I was informed at his IEP meeting that they have a new goal of being able to read, spell and write 40 words. They addred the write part this year and the kindergarten teacher is not amused with this. They are also supposed to be able to write a 3 sentence paragraph and write a picture to go along with it. Looks like ill have another kid to homeschool after next year. Sotime the do better when its slowed up and given more time. But my little guy can't even write his name very well right now. Took them 6 months to get him to make an X properly. Yet this is what hew is supposed to  do in the next 9 months after he returns from school. riiiiight.


I'm thinking home schooling might not be the way to go.
2013-05-27 01:55:05 PM  
1 votes:
As a PreK teacher I used to have conversations with parents where I told them their child was not ready for Kindergarten and it is definitely better to keep them out a year then have them end up repeating a grade later. Now I have conversations where I tell them YES! Your child, who you already kept in PreK for 2 years is READY for Kinder, and keeping them out another year s not the right thing to do.

A new one I heard this year was the high school quarterback being redshirted at the end of 6th grade. He had a summer birthday so at the end of 6th grade they took him out of the school district and had him repeat 6th grade at a private school and then start 7th grade back in the school district a year. I guess it all worked out well since they won the championship //sarcasm
2013-05-27 12:42:15 PM  
1 votes:

uknowzit: Interesting that the main culprits are affluent, white couples.
May say something about their parenting skills if the kid is emotionally unable to go to school with his peers.


We've turned education into competition. This isn't about "helicopter" parents, it's about "living vicariously through their kids" parents and "beating up the Joneses" parents. "I want my kid to be bigger and stronger than anyone there, and farther along developmentally, so it looks, at least for now, like my kid's superior."

Later, when your kid is two years older than everyone else, dumb as a stump because the intangibles he should've learned earlier weren't taught to him at the right time, developmentally speaking, and hostile as hell because he just can't socialize in any position other than that of domination, you can whine about how the school system failed you.
2013-05-27 12:36:59 PM  
1 votes:
We need more big dumb kids.

For employment in the armed forces...

mgoblog.com
2013-05-27 12:10:30 PM  
1 votes:
We wanted to hold one of my boys back, but the school kept saying, "he'll be bored."  He kept passing, but his grades kept getting lower and lower.  He failed 3 of 5 classes in 7th grade, but the school used his CRCT passing, as the reason for sending him on to 8th grade.  He failed every class, all year long, failed the CRCT, and suddenly the school says, the CRCT is meaningless, and he's ready for 9th grade.  It took almost an act of God to get the school to retain him for the 8th grade.
2013-05-27 11:52:07 AM  
1 votes:
Where I live the cut off is December 31. My youngest is in kindergarten this year, his birthday is at the end of December. The pressure from friends and family to hold him back was huge. In the end we decided to send him because he could sit criss cross applesauce, sing, and colour just fine. He knows his abc's and 123's which is all that is required of him in kindergarten. We also were eager to end the $1000/month daycare fee. He's pretty popular with the little boy crowd as well. I think it's partly because he has an older brother and knows a lot of choice swear words. He is pretty small for his age, and is literally the smallest kid in the whole school. That part does worry me.

I have a kid with an early January birthday as well, so I should have some anecdotal evidence in 10 years. He was ready for kindergarten the year before he was able to go, and waiting was pretty hard for him, he was pretty bored. Obviously that experience factored into our decision with the younger son.

Sport are always age grouped by jan-dec year, regardless of school grade. Always. I have a friend who held her kid back, but now regrets it because he cannot play hockey with his friends being a year older than everyone.
2013-05-27 11:41:57 AM  
1 votes:
My wife's nephew (more accurately - the nephew's crazy ass wife) decided to redshirt all of their kids with the specific intent of giving them a leg up on their peers regarding both academics and sports. Related: She also thinks Jesus rode a dinosaur into the sunset. Or the fossils were placed on earth by the hand of God to test our faith or something.

The kids are all < 10 so the jury is still out on how her cunning plan is going to work out. I'll report back in this thread in 5 years to let you all know the outcome.
2013-05-27 11:36:54 AM  
1 votes:
I just think it's funny that the bulk of Fark commenters picked the Star Trek red shirt reference, and not the college sports "red-shirted" reference.
2013-05-27 11:34:43 AM  
1 votes:

Anthracite: Oh and get to kow what they are getting ready to shove down your kids throats. Look up Common Core by Bill Gates. There is a new set of rules coming down the pike in the way they are going to teach the kids. They could not bring the scores up so they are dumbing down the lessons.

This is a link to a blog on it but there are links to other sites.

http://midtown.patch.com/blog_posts/common-core-by-bill-gates


If you think the common core is dumbing down kindergarten, you should stop reading blogs busy with "OMG! Bill Gates!" and start reading the actual standards.
2013-05-27 11:16:08 AM  
1 votes:

Carousel Beast: I disagree, and had the same discussion with my wife about our son (birthday in June). She felt he could stand to mature another year before school. I pointed out that within a few years he'd catch up regardless. Having an August birthday myself and going through being one of the younger people in my grade level, my argument was that he could deal with any early challenges with our help, because by middle school it'd be moot. But, if we waited to send him, that'd be a year of his life he'd never get back.

He'shiatting fifth grade in August this year. The few early problems were dealt with fairly easily and he's doing fine, and, like I did, he'll graduate at 17 and head into college - without essentially being penalized a year of time.


I don't know if I agree with you on this.  I think there are benefits and drawbacks to starting a child earlier rather than later, but here you only mention "a year of his life he'd never get back" and "being penalized a year of time."

To me it sounds like you're treating childhood as a race to complete, rather than something that could be enjoyable.  What is the real benefit to the child of graduating at 17 instead of 18?  Starting college 12 months earlier?  Getting a job 12 months earlier?  Having one more year of life spent on your career vs spent in childhood?  By themselves, are those things really good?  It's not as though by graduating from high school or college a year sooner the child won't have to compete to be successful at the next level - they'll simply have to compete a year sooner.  It is really better to give a person one less year of what we would normally consider childhood, and is that year really a waste?

My wife and I had a conversation about this when she said at one point her school considered skipping her ahead a grade and I mentioned my mom had skipped a grade at one point.  We both decided we wouldn't want it for ourselves or our children.  We saw it exactly the opposite of you.  Why steal a year of someone's development and childhood from them?  Any challenges that resulted from that decision (bored at school, not challenged) we could address at home.

I'm genuinely curious as to why you came down on the side of it being a year of his life he'd never get back.
2013-05-27 11:13:53 AM  
1 votes:

Anthracite: My soon to be 6 yr old starts Kindergarten this fall. I was informed at his IEP meeting that they have a new goal of being able to read, spell and write 40 words. They addred the write part this year and the kindergarten teacher is not amused with this. They are also supposed to be able to write a 3 sentence paragraph and write a picture to go along with it. Looks like ill have another kid to homeschool after next year. Sotime the do better when its slowed up and given more time. But my little guy can't even write his name very well right now. Took them 6 months to get him to make an X properly. Yet this is what hew is supposed to  do in the next 9 months after he returns from school. riiiiight.


6 months to learn how to cross 2 lines to make an "X"? Sounds like you made a gas station attendant - good for you!
2013-05-27 11:06:15 AM  
1 votes:

Anthracite: Oh and get to kow what they are getting ready to shove down your kids throats. Look up Common Core by Bill Gates. There is a new set of rules coming down the pike in the way they are going to teach the kids. They could not bring the scores up so they are dumbing down the lessons.


Aren't you the guy who was just complaining that teaching a 6 year old anything more complicated than making an X was pushing them too hard?
2013-05-27 11:03:14 AM  
1 votes:

Anthracite: My soon to be 6 yr old starts Kindergarten this fall. I was informed at his IEP meeting that they have a new goal of being able to read, spell and write 40 words. They addred the write part this year and the kindergarten teacher is not amused with this. They are also supposed to be able to write a 3 sentence paragraph and write a picture to go along with it. Looks like ill have another kid to homeschool after next year. Sotime the do better when its slowed up and given more time. But my little guy can't even write his name very well right now. Took them 6 months to get him to make an X properly. Yet this is what hew is supposed to  do in the next 9 months after he returns from school. riiiiight.


So you're going to pull your kid out of school because they're going to challenge him.
2013-05-27 10:54:07 AM  
1 votes:
I don't think this is the big deal you think it is, subby.
2013-05-27 10:51:28 AM  
1 votes:

mesmer242: I was one of the youngest in my class, and I was totally fine academically. Socially, I wasn't... but I was hanging out with older kids in the neighborhood, not the younger ones. My dad got "red-shirted" because they tried to put him in Kindergarten on time but there was some kind of bus drop-off mix up and he didn't handle it well and they realized he wasn't really ready. My mom was one of the youngest in her class and was totally fine socially but wasn't ready for high school math when she started 9th grade which really impacted her badly.

In conclusion, have your kids in February-May. It's easier for everybody.


the general consensus among early childhood development specialists is that the average girl, by the time they are 5, has already developed the verbal and fine motor skills it requires to sit in a classroom for long periods of time. Plus they are already socially gregarious by nature. Boys, who pop out of the womb knowing how to kick a soccer ball and throw a baseball, develop their verbal skills much later and the fine motor skills required for pushing a pencil across paper do not come naturally until 8. This is just the average and not true of every kid. but the kindergarten teacher will tell you that the hardest part of her job is keeping  the boys in their seats and getting the girls to shut up for five seconds.
2013-05-27 10:41:22 AM  
1 votes:

StoPPeRmobile: TNG was a sequel, not a reboot.


If that helps you sleep at night.


LOL, where did that come from? TNG takes place 80 years after the original series and involves different characters. Use your words.
2013-05-27 10:33:47 AM  
1 votes:

StoPPeRmobile: Orgasmatron138: ukexpat: sno man: I've seen that show, it never ends well for the guy in the red shirt.

That was my first thought - the "security guy" in the red shirt never made it back to the Enterprise.

My wife and I rented the first Star Trek reboot last week to refresh our memories before seeing Into Darkness.  I laughed when I noticed the third guy that went to disable the big drilling machine with Kirk and Sulu had a red shirt on.

Frowns on your ignorance.
[images2.wikia.nocookie.net image 500x326]


TNG was a sequel, not a reboot.
2013-05-27 10:26:25 AM  
1 votes:
www.hautus.org
2013-05-27 10:25:51 AM  
1 votes:
You folks understand why this generations-old phenomenon is suddenly a problem, don't you?

""The teacher is mostly impacted by it. They are dealing with children of ages ranging between four and a half and six and a half. This is a large developmental gap when trying to get through the state standard curricula," said Vela.

Back in the one-room schoolhouse on the prairie, kids of all ages learned together under one teacher.  The older ones helped the younger ones, reinforcing what the older ones had learned and building a cooperative community.

Today, kids are segregated into one-year grade levels, with a "state standard curriculum" for each year.  That's the teachers' problem, not the developmental gap between 4.5 and 6 year-olds.
2013-05-27 10:25:20 AM  
1 votes:

Nabb1: simplicimus: Parents have been doing this for decades. If you know your child is not ready for Kindergarten, don't enroll them.

Exactly. Now that we are looking at schools for our kids, I've noticed the cut off date for the child's birthday is earlier than when I was a child. In our district, it's in early September, but it was Nov. 1 when I was five. Nt that it mattered to me, because my birthday is in August.


When I started school, the cutoff in my district was actually December 31st.  I was one of the youngest in my class because I had a November birthday. I graduated at 17..My folks could have easily waited a year.  A few years later they moved the cutoff to August 1st.
2013-05-27 10:22:24 AM  
1 votes:
From TFA:

Redshirting poses challenges not only to children but to teachers and parents.

"The teacher is mostly impacted by it. They are dealing with children of ages ranging between four and a half and six and a half. This is a large developmental gap when trying to get through the state standard curricula," said Vela.


Isn't the problem here not the differing ages, but that the kids are being taught to a state standard curricula?
2013-05-27 10:21:01 AM  
1 votes:

Nabb1: simplicimus: Parents have been doing this for decades. If you know your child is not ready for Kindergarten, don't enroll them.

Exactly. Now that we are looking at schools for our kids, I've noticed the cut off date for the child's birthday is earlier than when I was a child. In our district, it's in early September, but it was Nov. 1 when I was five. Nt that it mattered to me, because my birthday is in August.


I disagree, and had the same discussion with my wife about our son (birthday in June). She felt he could stand to mature another year before school. I pointed out that within a few years he'd catch up regardless. Having an August birthday myself and going through being one of the younger people in my grade level, my argument was that he could deal with any early challenges with our help, because by middle school it'd be moot. But, if we waited to send him, that'd be a year of his life he'd never get back.

He'shiatting fifth grade in August this year. The few early problems were dealt with fairly easily and he's doing fine, and, like I did, he'll graduate at 17 and head into college - without essentially being penalized a year of time.
2013-05-27 10:17:34 AM  
1 votes:
this is why a monolithic approach to education is silly.

we should have some kids start in January. that way you could move forward or backward a half grade and it wouldn't be as big of a jump.
2013-05-27 10:15:45 AM  
1 votes:
When I enroll my daughter in kindergarten, it will be to stop paying for daycare.

/aren't they the same thing?
2013-05-27 10:14:48 AM  
1 votes:

BolshyGreatYarblocks: sno man: I've seen that show, it never ends well for the guy in the red shirt.

[library.sc.edu image 410x600]

Speak for yourself, cornuto.  I liberated my homeland; what have you done with your life?


Yeah but Garibaldi's on a totally different show.
2013-05-27 10:14:18 AM  
1 votes:
I was one of the youngest in my class, and I was totally fine academically. Socially, I wasn't... but I was hanging out with older kids in the neighborhood, not the younger ones. My dad got "red-shirted" because they tried to put him in Kindergarten on time but there was some kind of bus drop-off mix up and he didn't handle it well and they realized he wasn't really ready. My mom was one of the youngest in her class and was totally fine socially but wasn't ready for high school math when she started 9th grade which really impacted her badly.

In conclusion, have your kids in February-May. It's easier for everybody.
2013-05-27 10:12:46 AM  
1 votes:
There's a kid in my kid's kindergarten class that just turned eight.
2013-05-27 10:10:43 AM  
1 votes:
Hmmm...haven't I read about this somewhere before?

nichequest.com
2013-05-27 10:03:44 AM  
1 votes:
When I switched to private school most of the kids in my grade were held back.  I think it worked well.  The biggest advantage they had wasn't for sports, they got their driver's license a year early!

Anecdotally, I'd say those held back were probably a little better socially too.  Not all, but on average.
2013-05-27 09:25:13 AM  
1 votes:
My older son went when he was ready. There has been a hiccup or two along the way because he's the youngest in his class. But he does fine. Sports doesn't really matter since most around here are done by age anyway. My younger son waited a year because he just wasn't ready. It worked out well too. There's these things called teachers and sometimes they use assessments to help parents decide when is the right time to enroll. I suggest seeking them out if there are any in your area. They seem really helpful.
2013-05-27 09:05:52 AM  
1 votes:

czetie: If the kid isn't ready, especially socially, sure, why not?

If the kid *is* ready, you're just buying yourself a 1st grade year with you kid acting out because he's bored, frustrated, and not interacting at his level.


And the drugs, don't forget the drugs.
2013-05-27 09:02:32 AM  
1 votes:
If the kid isn't ready, especially socially, sure, why not?

If the kid *is* ready, you're just buying yourself a 1st grade year with you kid acting out because he's bored, frustrated, and not interacting at his level.
2013-05-27 08:57:39 AM  
1 votes:
Yeah but if they beam down with Kirk and McCoy, they're farked.
2013-05-27 08:27:52 AM  
1 votes:

simplicimus: Parents have been doing this for decades. If you know your child is not ready for Kindergarten, don't enroll them.


Exactly. Now that we are looking at schools for our kids, I've noticed the cut off date for the child's birthday is earlier than when I was a child. In our district, it's in early September, but it was Nov. 1 when I was five. Nt that it mattered to me, because my birthday is in August.
 
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