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(ABC)   Helicopter parenting rises to new altitudes: "Redshirting" kids at kindergarten so they are bigger, better at sports, and more academically adept than their peers   (abcnews.go.com) divider line 155
    More: Fail, helicopter parenting, preschool teacher, National Center for Education Statistics, tenth grade, kindergartens  
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16019 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 May 2013 at 9:59 AM (46 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-27 07:50:46 AM
I've seen that show, it never ends well for the guy in the red shirt.
 
2013-05-27 07:59:39 AM
Parents have been doing this for decades. If you know your child is not ready for Kindergarten, don't enroll them.
 
2013-05-27 08:20:31 AM

simplicimus: Parents have been doing this for decades. If you know your child is not ready for Kindergarten, don't enroll them.


Yeah.  My neighbors did this with their two sons 40 years ago.

Doing it for sports is asshattery, but for emotional/social/educational reasons, I think it's valid.
 
2013-05-27 08:27:52 AM

simplicimus: Parents have been doing this for decades. If you know your child is not ready for Kindergarten, don't enroll them.


Exactly. Now that we are looking at schools for our kids, I've noticed the cut off date for the child's birthday is earlier than when I was a child. In our district, it's in early September, but it was Nov. 1 when I was five. Nt that it mattered to me, because my birthday is in August.
 
2013-05-27 08:33:00 AM

Earguy: Doing it for sports is asshattery


And not terribly effective, the only place they'd get any advantage would be in intramural.  Any league outside of school is age based, not grade based.
 
2013-05-27 08:49:45 AM
This isn't new.
 
2013-05-27 08:57:39 AM
Yeah but if they beam down with Kirk and McCoy, they're farked.
 
2013-05-27 09:02:32 AM
If the kid isn't ready, especially socially, sure, why not?

If the kid *is* ready, you're just buying yourself a 1st grade year with you kid acting out because he's bored, frustrated, and not interacting at his level.
 
2013-05-27 09:04:35 AM

Mugato: Yeah but if they beam down with Kirk and McCoy, they're farked.


And as Galaxy Quest pointed out, they just get called "Crewman".
 
2013-05-27 09:05:52 AM

czetie: If the kid isn't ready, especially socially, sure, why not?

If the kid *is* ready, you're just buying yourself a 1st grade year with you kid acting out because he's bored, frustrated, and not interacting at his level.


And the drugs, don't forget the drugs.
 
2013-05-27 09:22:28 AM

JerseyTim: This isn't new.


Nope.  A friend's little brother did this years ago- he's going to Yale in the fall so I guess anecdotally it must have been a good decision!

/ I know it doesn't work that way
// really think he was redshirted for a slight academic advantage rather than emotional maturity reasons knowing his mom
 
2013-05-27 09:25:13 AM
My older son went when he was ready. There has been a hiccup or two along the way because he's the youngest in his class. But he does fine. Sports doesn't really matter since most around here are done by age anyway. My younger son waited a year because he just wasn't ready. It worked out well too. There's these things called teachers and sometimes they use assessments to help parents decide when is the right time to enroll. I suggest seeking them out if there are any in your area. They seem really helpful.
 
2013-05-27 09:48:01 AM
Got sent to Kindergarten at four, graduated high school at 17, college at 21.

Shockingly being able to kick a kickball a shorter distance in recess in 2nd grade than my classmates hasn't been brought up by any employers.
 
2013-05-27 10:02:07 AM
Thank goodness I read the article.  When I saw "redshirting" I thought they meant as members of the away time on an unexplored world.  That would be a terrible thing to do with kids.
 
2013-05-27 10:03:44 AM
When I switched to private school most of the kids in my grade were held back.  I think it worked well.  The biggest advantage they had wasn't for sports, they got their driver's license a year early!

Anecdotally, I'd say those held back were probably a little better socially too.  Not all, but on average.
 
2013-05-27 10:06:56 AM
More parents are putting off a child's kindergarten entry so he or she will be a little older than the classmates. It's a phenomenon known as redshirting.

When I was a kid, it was called "being held back a grade." The rest of the kids just assumed you were a moron who couldn't handle finger painting and was probably going to eat all the paste.
 
2013-05-27 10:07:25 AM
"Teachers may encourage redshirting because more mature children are easier to handle in the classroom and initially produce better test scores than their younger classmates. In a class of 25, the average difference is equivalent to going from 13th place to 11th. This advantage fades by the end of elementary school, though, and disadvantages start to accumulate. In high school, redshirted children are less motivated and perform less well. By adulthood, they are no better off in wages or educational attainment - in fact, their lifetime earnings are reduced by one year."

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/25/opinion/sunday/dont-delay-your-kind e rgartners-start.html

Turns out the youngest kids in a class are more motivated by their peers' example to catch up, while the older tend to learn they can coast.
 
2013-05-27 10:09:16 AM

sno man: I've seen that show, it never ends well for the guy in the red shirt.


library.sc.edu

Speak for yourself, cornuto.  I liberated my homeland; what have you done with your life?
 
2013-05-27 10:10:43 AM
Hmmm...haven't I read about this somewhere before?

nichequest.com
 
2013-05-27 10:12:46 AM
There's a kid in my kid's kindergarten class that just turned eight.
 
2013-05-27 10:12:52 AM

Mr. Coffee Nerves: Got sent to Kindergarten at four, graduated high school at 17, college at 21.


Same for me.  Although annoying that I couldn't get in bars until a few weeks into my senior year in college.
 
2013-05-27 10:13:21 AM

sno man: I've seen that show, it never ends well for the guy in the red shirt.


That was my first thought - the "security guy" in the red shirt never made it back to the Enterprise.
 
2013-05-27 10:14:18 AM
I was one of the youngest in my class, and I was totally fine academically. Socially, I wasn't... but I was hanging out with older kids in the neighborhood, not the younger ones. My dad got "red-shirted" because they tried to put him in Kindergarten on time but there was some kind of bus drop-off mix up and he didn't handle it well and they realized he wasn't really ready. My mom was one of the youngest in her class and was totally fine socially but wasn't ready for high school math when she started 9th grade which really impacted her badly.

In conclusion, have your kids in February-May. It's easier for everybody.
 
2013-05-27 10:14:48 AM

BolshyGreatYarblocks: sno man: I've seen that show, it never ends well for the guy in the red shirt.

[library.sc.edu image 410x600]

Speak for yourself, cornuto.  I liberated my homeland; what have you done with your life?


Yeah but Garibaldi's on a totally different show.
 
2013-05-27 10:15:45 AM
When I enroll my daughter in kindergarten, it will be to stop paying for daycare.

/aren't they the same thing?
 
2013-05-27 10:17:34 AM
this is why a monolithic approach to education is silly.

we should have some kids start in January. that way you could move forward or backward a half grade and it wouldn't be as big of a jump.
 
2013-05-27 10:17:49 AM
This certainly gives an edge to kiddie athletes, as readers of Gladwell's essay about hockey players in Canada should know.

And if it's true that boys suffer in the new US kindergarten-is-the-new-1st-grade educational frame, then holding them back a grade would at least keep them from falling behind.


/pointed-headed inty-llectual
//thinks that society will always revere men's bulk over their brains
///they don't innocently ask about activities and sports on college applications
////look like a winner
Vdon't look like a loser
 
2013-05-27 10:19:24 AM

ukexpat: sno man: I've seen that show, it never ends well for the guy in the red shirt.

That was my first thought - the "security guy" in the red shirt never made it back to the Enterprise.


My wife and I rented the first Star Trek reboot last week to refresh our memories before seeing Into Darkness.  I laughed when I noticed the third guy that went to disable the big drilling machine with Kirk and Sulu had a red shirt on.
 
2013-05-27 10:21:01 AM

Nabb1: simplicimus: Parents have been doing this for decades. If you know your child is not ready for Kindergarten, don't enroll them.

Exactly. Now that we are looking at schools for our kids, I've noticed the cut off date for the child's birthday is earlier than when I was a child. In our district, it's in early September, but it was Nov. 1 when I was five. Nt that it mattered to me, because my birthday is in August.


I disagree, and had the same discussion with my wife about our son (birthday in June). She felt he could stand to mature another year before school. I pointed out that within a few years he'd catch up regardless. Having an August birthday myself and going through being one of the younger people in my grade level, my argument was that he could deal with any early challenges with our help, because by middle school it'd be moot. But, if we waited to send him, that'd be a year of his life he'd never get back.

He'shiatting fifth grade in August this year. The few early problems were dealt with fairly easily and he's doing fine, and, like I did, he'll graduate at 17 and head into college - without essentially being penalized a year of time.
 
2013-05-27 10:21:25 AM

simplicimus: Parents have been doing this for decades. If you know your child is not ready for Kindergarten, don't enroll them.


In England, children start the school in the school year (September 1st - August 31st) in which they have their fifth birthday. That means you have children aged 4 years and 1 day starting with children aged 5 years. At that age, one year can be a huge difference, both physically and intellectually, and there is very good evidence that summer born children continue to have problems for a long time afterwards. They are, for example, significantly less likely to go to Oxford or Cambridge and significantly less likely to play professional football.

In Scotland children start aged between 4 1/2 and 5 1/2, and that appears to have fewer disadvantages.
 
2013-05-27 10:21:37 AM
A helicopter mother should plan for coitus only when the nine-month outcome would occur at the optimal time for the school year. For instance, race horses are all aged at January 1, thus most racehorses are born as soon after January 1 as possible when the weather is particularly nasty.

For a Farkin' Genius however, it's just luck unless you subscribe to Divine Providence.

the-big-bang-theory.com
 
2013-05-27 10:22:24 AM
From TFA:

Redshirting poses challenges not only to children but to teachers and parents.

"The teacher is mostly impacted by it. They are dealing with children of ages ranging between four and a half and six and a half. This is a large developmental gap when trying to get through the state standard curricula," said Vela.


Isn't the problem here not the differing ages, but that the kids are being taught to a state standard curricula?
 
2013-05-27 10:22:26 AM

Orgasmatron138: ukexpat: sno man: I've seen that show, it never ends well for the guy in the red shirt.

That was my first thought - the "security guy" in the red shirt never made it back to the Enterprise.

My wife and I rented the first Star Trek reboot last week to refresh our memories before seeing Into Darkness.  I laughed when I noticed the third guy that went to disable the big drilling machine with Kirk and Sulu had a red shirt on.


"We need a team for this exploratory mission! Okay, let's see, we have Kirk, Spock, Sulu and Ensign Ricky. Good luck, Ricky."
 
2013-05-27 10:25:20 AM

Nabb1: simplicimus: Parents have been doing this for decades. If you know your child is not ready for Kindergarten, don't enroll them.

Exactly. Now that we are looking at schools for our kids, I've noticed the cut off date for the child's birthday is earlier than when I was a child. In our district, it's in early September, but it was Nov. 1 when I was five. Nt that it mattered to me, because my birthday is in August.


When I started school, the cutoff in my district was actually December 31st.  I was one of the youngest in my class because I had a November birthday. I graduated at 17..My folks could have easily waited a year.  A few years later they moved the cutoff to August 1st.
 
2013-05-27 10:25:51 AM
You folks understand why this generations-old phenomenon is suddenly a problem, don't you?

""The teacher is mostly impacted by it. They are dealing with children of ages ranging between four and a half and six and a half. This is a large developmental gap when trying to get through the state standard curricula," said Vela.

Back in the one-room schoolhouse on the prairie, kids of all ages learned together under one teacher.  The older ones helped the younger ones, reinforcing what the older ones had learned and building a cooperative community.

Today, kids are segregated into one-year grade levels, with a "state standard curriculum" for each year.  That's the teachers' problem, not the developmental gap between 4.5 and 6 year-olds.
 
2013-05-27 10:26:15 AM
I was "redshirted" when I was grade school...but in a more of a "Star Treky" way :(
 
2013-05-27 10:26:25 AM
www.hautus.org
 
2013-05-27 10:27:07 AM

Carousel Beast: He'shiatting fifth grade in August this year.


Yeah I know that feeling. That's how I felt about fifth grade too.
 
2013-05-27 10:27:53 AM

Orgasmatron138: ukexpat: sno man: I've seen that show, it never ends well for the guy in the red shirt.

That was my first thought - the "security guy" in the red shirt never made it back to the Enterprise.

My wife and I rented the first Star Trek reboot last week to refresh our memories before seeing Into Darkness.  I laughed when I noticed the third guy that went to disable the big drilling machine with Kirk and Sulu had a red shirt on.


Frowns on your ignorance.
images2.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2013-05-27 10:27:54 AM

Shazam999: There's a kid in my kid's kindergarten class that just turned eight.


He will be able to drive to middle school though, but he better not date his classmates in high school.
 
2013-05-27 10:29:21 AM

Mouser: From TFA:

Redshirting poses challenges not only to children but to teachers and parents.

"The teacher is mostly impacted by it. They are dealing with children of ages ranging between four and a half and six and a half. This is a large developmental gap when trying to get through the state standard curricula," said Vela.

Isn't the problem here not the differing ages, but that the kids are being taught to a state standard curricula?


No, parents are afraid that Law Enforcement will get involved. Because laws must be enforced.
 
2013-05-27 10:30:07 AM

eldoobie: Shazam999: There's a kid in my kid's kindergarten class that just turned eight.

He will be able to drive to middle school though, but he better not date his classmates in high school.


lol

Instant crime is fun
 
2013-05-27 10:30:37 AM
Good idea because DA RED WUNS GOES FASTA!!
 
2013-05-27 10:30:47 AM

Earguy: simplicimus: Parents have been doing this for decades. If you know your child is not ready for Kindergarten, don't enroll them.

Yeah.  My neighbors did this with their two sons 40 years ago.

Doing it for sports is asshattery, but for emotional/social/educational reasons, I think it's valid.


...and then the kid gets ridiculed for being "held back" when his friends find out.
 
2013-05-27 10:32:41 AM

Skirl Hutsenreiter: "Teachers may encourage redshirting because more mature children are easier to handle in the classroom and initially produce better test scores than their younger classmates. In a class of 25, the average difference is equivalent to going from 13th place to 11th. This advantage fades by the end of elementary school, though, and disadvantages start to accumulate. In high school, redshirted children are less motivated and perform less well. By adulthood, they are no better off in wages or educational attainment - in fact, their lifetime earnings are reduced by one year."

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/25/opinion/sunday/dont-delay-your-kind e rgartners-start.html

Turns out the youngest kids in a class are more motivated by their peers' example to catch up, while the older tend to learn they can coast.


I'll give you one exception. My nephew went to kindergarten at the normal age but could not master staying in his seat or concentrating on the work at hand. He was just not socially developed enough at the time. His brother, admitted at the appropriate level, was a prefect student.
 
2013-05-27 10:33:11 AM

Shazam999: There's a kid in my kid's kindergarten class that just turned eight.


WTF? My son turns eight in June and is going into the third grade this year.
 
2013-05-27 10:33:47 AM

StoPPeRmobile: Orgasmatron138: ukexpat: sno man: I've seen that show, it never ends well for the guy in the red shirt.

That was my first thought - the "security guy" in the red shirt never made it back to the Enterprise.

My wife and I rented the first Star Trek reboot last week to refresh our memories before seeing Into Darkness.  I laughed when I noticed the third guy that went to disable the big drilling machine with Kirk and Sulu had a red shirt on.

Frowns on your ignorance.
[images2.wikia.nocookie.net image 500x326]


TNG was a sequel, not a reboot.
 
2013-05-27 10:34:07 AM

StoPPeRmobile: Orgasmatron138: ukexpat: sno man: I've seen that show, it never ends well for the guy in the red shirt.

That was my first thought - the "security guy" in the red shirt never made it back to the Enterprise.

My wife and I rented the first Star Trek reboot last week to refresh our memories before seeing Into Darkness.  I laughed when I noticed the third guy that went to disable the big drilling machine with Kirk and Sulu had a red shirt on.

Frowns on your ignorance.
[images2.wikia.nocookie.net image 500x326]


Technically, that's a sequel, isn't it?  Reboots start the story over using the same characters.
 
2013-05-27 10:34:49 AM
Just enroll them when they're ready.  I did Pre-K at 3.5 and Kindergarten at 4.5 and turned out fine because I was ready.  If that means delaying, so be it.  Don't delay them if they're ready though, that's ridiculous. lolparents

Igor Jakovsky: When I started school, the cutoff in my district was actually December 31st. I was one of the youngest in my class because I had a November birthday. I graduated at 17..My folks could have easily waited a year. A few years later they moved the cutoff to August 1st.


Very same thing happened to me (December birthday), and I am glad that I made it under the old cutoff.  They actually changed it the very next year in my district.  Graduating at 17 was actually pretty awesome.
 
2013-05-27 10:35:24 AM
This has always been around.  Either your kid graduates at 17 or 18.  If it's 16 or 19 you're doing it wrong.
 
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