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(Time)   Ten bridges in America that are ready to kill you at any minute   (nation.time.com ) divider line
    More: Scary, Federal Highway Administration  
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23434 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 May 2013 at 4:26 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-27 10:26:25 AM  

raerae1980: Shadow Blasko: List is missing every bridge in PA that goes OVER the turnpikes.

LOL!!  My first thought when I checked the list was OH FARK because I live in Los Angeles.  But, my second thought was WHAT the FARK as there were no bridges from PA.  I'm from Pittsburgh...it seems strange they were not on the list.


Especially since Allegheny county has more bridges than any other county in the US, and many of them are 100+ years old. Better engineering? Better steel?
What a nearly 100 y/o bridge pier looks like on a railroad bridge crossing the Allegheny river right next to the Turnpike bridges. The pier looks like it will last 1000 years. Other than the black color from the days of all the soot in the air, it looks to be in perfect shape.
 
2013-05-27 10:26:27 AM  
this list looks retarded...  No way these are the worst....
 
2013-05-27 10:27:18 AM  

HaywoodJablonski: All in blue states, interestingly enough


Could it be, that the "red states" haven't mastered the art of bridge building, yet?
 
2013-05-27 10:28:32 AM  

mamoru: Yeah? Well, I'm in Thailand. So, good luck with that, American bridges! :p


Careful. Some bridges like to disguise themselves as six-year-old boys.
 
2013-05-27 10:58:10 AM  

MarkEC: The pier looks like it will last 1000 years.


You know what else was supposed to last a thousand years?
 
2013-05-27 11:24:03 AM  

OgreMagi: Obama had proposed shovel ready jobs to upgrade the nation's crumbling infrastructure.  This was a good thing and long overdue.  Unfortunately, the feminist groups hated the idea because shovel ready jobs meant work for "burly men" (their words).  So Obama gave in to the political pressure and sent most of the money elsewhere.  It didn't matter that this was work that needed to be done.  It didn't matter that 80% of the jobs lost in the recession were "burly man" types of jobs.  Political correctness must be obeyed.

So when a bridge collapses and people die, you can thank NOW.

I was under the impression that woman can do any job a man can do.  So why did they complain about these physical jobs?


Are you trying to say funding important things like "socially aware" puppet shows, renovating martini bars or developing "Dance Tube," an interactive dance software did not improve our infrastructure or create shovel ready jobs?
 
2013-05-27 11:33:03 AM  

MarkEC: raerae1980: Shadow Blasko: List is missing every bridge in PA that goes OVER the turnpikes.

LOL!!  My first thought when I checked the list was OH FARK because I live in Los Angeles.  But, my second thought was WHAT the FARK as there were no bridges from PA.  I'm from Pittsburgh...it seems strange they were not on the list.

Especially since Allegheny county has more bridges than any other county in the US, and many of them are 100+ years old. Better engineering? Better steel?
What a nearly 100 y/o bridge pier looks like on a railroad bridge crossing the Allegheny river right next to the Turnpike bridges. The pier looks like it will last 1000 years. Other than the black color from the days of all the soot in the air, it looks to be in perfect shape.


I live about 1000' from that bridge.

Those piers are over 100 years old and have supported two separate spans. The "new" bridge was built on top of the piers while the old bridge was still in use.

They cut the approaches, dropped the old bridge, and pushed the new one in place.

The scale of that thing has to be seen to be appreciated.
 
2013-05-27 11:41:57 AM  

chuggernaught: Want to save the country? then undo everything that led to this condition. Force our industries back home with tariffs, raise the top tier taxes back to 70%, end all the corporate subsidies and corporate tax loopholes...

Then we might be able to afford to keep your bridges from collapsing from underneath you.




Disregarding your historical ignorance of the tax code and the fact that nobody really paid 70% (there were a lot more loop holes and shelters back then -up through the 1980s) the fact is government does not need more of our or anybody else's money. It already takes in plenty but it wastes it.

Look at the Stimulus spending . What little that did actually go for infrastructure went to a lot of stupid "infrastructure" . This is just a few of those stupid projects:

$424,000 to install electric battery charges at TR Auto Truck Plaza (truck stop), which is now bankrupt. A review of public records shows evidence that the owner's past and present finances were rocky.

$2,096,000 to Greenbrier Valley Airport, where only 2 commercial flights come in daily with an average of 6 passengers and the local hotel costs $500 a night, to spruce up the terminal building.

$9.38 million to renovate a century-old train depot that hasn't been used in 30 yrs

$1 million to replace 100 bike lockers and a bike garage

$800,000 to John Murtha Airport to repave runway - the airport serves 20 passengers daily

$11 million for Microsoft to build a bridge connecting its two headquarter campuses in Washington state

$1.15 million for a guardrail around a persistently dry lake bed

$89,298 to replace a quarter-mile stretch of sidewalk that was replaced 5 yrs ago

$54 million to elevate and relocate 3,000 ft of track for the Napa Valley Wine Train

3.5 million to repaint and add a security camera to one bridge

$5 million to a Missouri bridge project that was already fully funded

$7,470,191 for a bridge over train tracks in Nebraska so 168 residents didn't have to wait for the train to pass

$14.7 million to rebuild an airstrip in Ouzinkie, which has an estimated year-round population of 200 and is unknown to most Alaskans


But you go ahead with stupid belief that Federal, state and local governments, that collectively already take about $5 trillion dollars from us need more of our money.
 
2013-05-27 11:43:18 AM  
What about Jeff?

I mean, that look in his eyes...


/scared
 
2013-05-27 11:44:43 AM  

forgotmydamnusername: miss diminutive: LordJiro: tinfoil-hat maggie: OgreMagi: Obama had proposed shovel ready jobs to upgrade the nation's crumbling infrastructure.  This was a good thing and long overdue.  Unfortunately, the feminist groups hated the idea because shovel ready jobs meant work for "burly men" (their words).  So Obama gave in to the political pressure and sent most of the money elsewhere.  It didn't matter that this was work that needed to be done.  It didn't matter that 80% of the jobs lost in the recession were "burly man" types of jobs.  Political correctness must be obeyed.

So when a bridge collapses and people die, you can thank NOW.

I was under the impression that woman can do any job a man can do.  So why did they complain about these physical jobs?

What? citations please and most road crews I see have women as well as men.

And in fact, implying that ONLY men are capable of doing these jobs seems very..out-of-character for "the feminist groups".

Maybe they were implying that women can do these jobs but aren't hired by employers because of their perceived lack of burliness?

/straw grasping here

It's a real thing for at least certain aspects of some jobs. Perhaps 1 in 20 women could hope to get as much of the larger trade sizes of conduit run in a day as I can by myself, and they physically break down sooner if they do it every day. If you respond to that by giving them the light work, then I'm more likely to be running 4" conduit every farking day, and then I break down sooner.


My whole time in the oilfield I met one woman who could keep up with the men on the crew.  She was about 6'2", 200 pounds, and from the backwoods of Eastern Canada somewhere.  I figure maybe half a percent of women worldwide have her work capacity.

Every other woman I met in the field has been an engineer, geologist, or secretary.
 
2013-05-27 11:46:27 AM  
www.absolutefiction.com
 
2013-05-27 11:54:38 AM  

mojofriendship: Seems odd that "Interstate 695, crosses Maryland Route 26" is listed since the span was just rebuilt over the past few years  (http://roads.maryland.gov/pages/release.aspx?newsId=677). Wouldn't it have made sense to google each bridge to see if anything has changed since the report was written or is that just too much to expect from the press?



And the Massachusetts bridge on the list was replaced in 2011. So Time's "article" is at least 20% inaccurate. Way to keep those high journalistic standards, Time.
 
2013-05-27 12:25:42 PM  

Maul555: this list looks retarded...  No way these are the worst....


There are a couple where it's fairly obvious guard rails no longer line up correctly. This may be evidence of shearing. You should be a little nervous if you're stuck in traffic on a bridge and you spot that.
 
2013-05-27 12:43:20 PM  
I give you FM407 over I-35E, which was supposed to be replaced five years ago when they cut away at it's western hill. The whole thing dates back to the 60's when there were only farms and weekend houses, now it supports the daily traffic of tens of thousands.

fbcdn-sphotos-c-a.akamaihd.net
I'd suggest putting a camera on the whole thing so you can have some footage to sell when it comes down across I-35E in evening rush hour traffic.
 
2013-05-27 12:44:09 PM  

Shadow Blasko: List is missing every bridge in PA that goes OVER the turnpikes.


FTFY

According to a recent report, PA has the worst bridges on average in the entire country. The list in TFA was clearly wrong, if anyone noticed.
 
2013-05-27 01:49:41 PM  

OgreMagi: Obama had proposed shovel ready jobs to upgrade the nation's crumbling infrastructure.  This was a good thing and long overdue.  Unfortunately, the feminist groups hated the idea because shovel ready jobs meant work for "burly men" (their words).  So Obama gave in to the political pressure and sent most of the money elsewhere.  It didn't matter that this was work that needed to be done.  It didn't matter that 80% of the jobs lost in the recession were "burly man" types of jobs.  Political correctness must be obeyed.

So when a bridge collapses and people die, you can thank NOW.

I was under the impression that woman can do any job a man can do.  So why did they complain about these physical jobs?


Can do and want to do are very different things. Just like men's equality and women's equality are very different things.
 
2013-05-27 02:03:52 PM  
2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-05-27 02:15:07 PM  

hasty ambush: chuggernaught: Want to save the country? then undo everything that led to this condition. Force our industries back home with tariffs, raise the top tier taxes back to 70%, end all the corporate subsidies and corporate tax loopholes...

Then we might be able to afford to keep your bridges from collapsing from underneath you.

Disregarding your historical ignorance of the tax code and the fact that nobody really paid 70% (there were a lot more loop holes and shelters back then -up through the 1980s) the fact is government does not need more of our or anybody else's money. It already takes in plenty but it wastes it.

Look at the Stimulus spending . What little that did actually go for infrastructure went to a lot of stupid "infrastructure" . This is just a few of those stupid projects:

$424,000 to install electric battery charges at TR Auto Truck Plaza (truck stop), which is now bankrupt. A review of public records shows evidence that the owner's past and present finances were rocky.

$2,096,000 to Greenbrier Valley Airport, where only 2 commercial flights come in daily with an average of 6 passengers and the local hotel costs $500 a night, to spruce up the terminal building.

$9.38 million to renovate a century-old train depot that hasn't been used in 30 yrs

$1 million to replace 100 bike lockers and a bike garage

$800,000 to John Murtha Airport to repave runway - the airport serves 20 passengers daily

$11 million for Microsoft to build a bridge connecting its two headquarter campuses in Washington state

$1.15 million for a guardrail around a persistently dry lake bed

$89,298 to replace a quarter-mile stretch of sidewalk that was replaced 5 yrs ago

$54 million to elevate and relocate 3,000 ft of track for the Napa Valley Wine Train

3.5 million to repaint and add a security camera to one bridge

$5 million to a Missouri bridge project that was already fully funded

$7,470,191 for a bridge over train tracks in Nebraska so 168 residents didn't have to wai ...



Strange, sounds like the American version of capitalism to me.
 
2013-05-27 02:25:16 PM  

Tomfoolery Rules Over Logical Living: mojofriendship: Seems odd that "Interstate 695, crosses Maryland Route 26" is listed since the span was just rebuilt over the past few years  (http://roads.maryland.gov/pages/release.aspx?newsId=677). Wouldn't it have made sense to google each bridge to see if anything has changed since the report was written or is that just too much to expect from the press?


And the Massachusetts bridge on the list was replaced in 2011. So Time's "article" is at least 20% inaccurate. Way to keep those high journalistic standards, Time.


This.  In the other thread someone posted the website from that project.  I totally couldn't remember if that was one of the bridges; turns out it is.  So ya, I'm calling shenanigans on this article.
 
2013-05-27 03:19:24 PM  
The driver had large load permits issued by the transportation authority who is very busy trying to back away from it all.

Signage in New York is screwed as it is measured from the axle of the wheel, not the ground. So signs marked 13.5 feet are actually 14.7 feet OR SO.
 
2013-05-27 03:47:32 PM  

hasty ambush: $2,096,000 to Greenbrier Valley Airport, where only 2 commercial flights come in daily with an average of 6 passengers and the local hotel costs $500 a night, to spruce up the terminal building.


Bullshiat.  In 2010 they served 12,293 people in 2010 on commercial flights alone.  They also serve a lot of private/charter type flights, about 22,000 total flight operations per year.
 
2013-05-27 03:57:05 PM  

hasty ambush: $54 million to elevate and relocate 3,000 ft of track for the Napa Valley Wine Train


Also has 55,000 aircraft operations a day, and the runway is shared by the PA Army National Guard, Air National Guard and the Marines.

hasty ambush: $54 million to elevate and relocate 3,000 ft of track for the Napa Valley Wine Train


Which was actually to help with a flood plan for the river it passed over, not for the benefit of the train.

hasty ambush: $11 million for Microsoft to build a bridge connecting its two headquarter campuses in Washington state


It was a WSDOT project to build a public roadway (NE 36th St in Redmond, if anyone's curious) over a state highway that serves a lot more than just the two Microsoft campuses, and that Microsoft contributed half the project cost to.

Why would you make things up that can be so easily fact checked?  At least most of that list is so vague I can't prove you just made it up, but some of these are really easy to look up.
 
2013-05-27 05:16:30 PM  

Mikeyworld: The truck stopped immediately after clearing the bridge, as the bridge collapsed immediately after being touched by the load.


As seen in this video clip. The truck keeps going as if nothing had happened, while the bridge folds up and falls.
 
2013-05-27 05:22:33 PM  
hasty ambush: [Misleading stuff]

Yeah, you see that libs?! LET IT ALL BURN!
 
2013-05-27 06:03:18 PM  

orbister: chuggernaught: Want to save the country? then undo everything that led to this condition. Force our industries back home with tariffs, raise the top tier taxes back to 70%, end all the corporate subsidies and corporate tax loopholes...

How many bridges could you have built for the cost of a couple of futile wars in, say, Iraq and Afghanistan?


That's a very good question, and one I can probably answer for you. I'm a highway design engineer with nearly 29 years of experience in designing projects, and a majority of those projects have been bridge replacement projects.

I'd say offhand that a typical rural two lane bridge can be replaced for about a million dollars, which would include the bridge removal, new bridge, approach work, guardrail, etc. Interstate bridges probably cost about $2 million each, since they are wider and usually higher than a rural structure (which makes them longer). Now, just how many TRILLIONS of dollars did we spend in Afghanistan/Iraq?

As for the article, it's once again aimed at the low information, easily scared reader. Not one of those bridges is going to collapse tomorrow, or the next day, or even next month. Yes they all are at the point where maintenance costs are very high compared to the usual bridge maintenance costs, but as long as they are maintained they won't collapse. The sufficiency rating (SR) is a number used to tell the state when it's time to replace a bridge. A shiny brand new bridge has a SR of 100. That number drops by 2 points every year even without deterioration or because it was designed under old standards. A 30 year old bridge, for example, would have a maximum SR score of 40 if it was in tiptop shape. The bridge maintenance guys can raise the SR some or hold it steady with remedial supports and redecking, but there's only so much that can be done for a very old bridge.

Don't worry about a bridge with a low SR score. Start worrying when the state lowers the maximum allowed weight limit and puts up a sign saying "max xx tons" where xx is a number lower than 40. I've seen signs saying "Max 2 Tons" on a metal truss bridge that was built back in 1924; it swayed when I walked across it, not to mention when a car drove over it. It had a SR of 2 because it was inspected constantly and had been reinforced underneath, but the weight limit sign is more important than the SR rating. The Bonner Bridge taking vehicles out to the Outer Banks in NC has a SR of 4 but that didn't stop tens of thousands of people driving across it this weekend.
 
2013-05-27 06:56:47 PM  
This list fails without the Tapan-Zee Bridge.
 
2013-05-27 07:17:52 PM  

Bendal: orbister: chuggernaught: Want to save the country? then undo everything that led to this condition. Force our industries back home with tariffs, raise the top tier taxes back to 70%, end all the corporate subsidies and corporate tax loopholes...

How many bridges could you have built for the cost of a couple of futile wars in, say, Iraq and Afghanistan?

That's a very good question, and one I can probably answer for you. I'm a highway design engineer with nearly 29 years of experience in designing projects, and a majority of those projects have been bridge replacement projects.

I'd say offhand that a typical rural two lane bridge can be replaced for about a million dollars, which would include the bridge removal, new bridge, approach work, guardrail, etc. Interstate bridges probably cost about $2 million each, since they are wider and usually higher than a rural structure (which makes them longer). Now, just how many TRILLIONS of dollars did we spend in Afghanistan/Iraq?

As for the article, it's once again aimed at the low information, easily scared reader. Not one of those bridges is going to collapse tomorrow, or the next day, or even next month. Yes they all are at the point where maintenance costs are very high compared to the usual bridge maintenance costs, but as long as they are maintained they won't collapse. The sufficiency rating (SR) is a number used to tell the state when it's time to replace a bridge. A shiny brand new bridge has a SR of 100. That number drops by 2 points every year even without deterioration or because it was designed under old standards. A 30 year old bridge, for example, would have a maximum SR score of 40 if it was in tiptop shape. The bridge maintenance guys can raise the SR some or hold it steady with remedial supports and redecking, but there's only so much that can be done for a very old bridge.

Don't worry about a bridge with a low SR score. Start worrying when the state lowers the maximum allowed weight limit and puts up a ...


This assumes that you don't have earthquakes anywhere close to 6.0 or higher? The East span of the Bay Bridge failed in places during the Loma Prieta quake, and was almost certainly rated better than 4. admittedly, quakes of that magnitude are not exceptionally common, but when your number comes up, it's up, and I'd prefer not to be sitting on a shiatty bridge when it does.
 
2013-05-27 09:37:27 PM  

antidumbass: The 1-75 'Brent Spence' bridge between Cincinnati and Covington, KY across the Ohio River. 50 years old, sporting microcracks from the strain of supporting the weight of a constant overload of traffic. Obama used this bridge as a campaign-based bad example of infrastructure crumble at the point in the election when Cincinnati was considered a possible 'decider' city.
Nothing heard from Washington since.


Each time I drive on that thing I wonder if this will be the day my car will plunge into the Ohio. I'm surprised it didn't make the list. Hell a few years ago concrete from the upper deck going south on 75 fell onto the lower deck. Remember that? You'd think that would get things going a bit on replacing it but not really. They all continue to argue about it among the regional leadership in KY & OH while DC isn't getting involved at all. Good of BO to bring it up during his campaign though. Hope it helped throw a few votes his way since that all those shiatheads in DC care about.
 
2013-05-27 10:36:57 PM  

amquelbettamin: Gotta love Maryland. Has two on the list.

State of incredibly high taxes, fees, and regulation. Still cannot have safe roads. I always wonder where all that money goes. For states: roads should be top priority.


Not sure how up to date this list is, as MD 26 has already been replaced.  The Milford Mill bridge is scheduled to be replaced starting in 2 weeks.

As far as where the money goes, in MD it is incredible how much is wasted on studies,  Some politician wants to build a bypass around a 500 person town.  So money is designated for the study, only to come back with the obvious conclusion that a bypass is not needed, but the politican can say "well I tried".  The rural legislators are by far the worst.
 
2013-05-27 11:39:11 PM  

historynow11: Might suggest adding the Herbert C. Bonner Bridge on NC-12 over the Oregon Inlet.  Driving over it you always wonder if it will collapse with you on it.

[media.hamptonroads.com image 500x288]


We quit going down to Hatteras because of that bridge. Been stopping at Nags Head for the past several years instead.
 
2013-05-28 12:00:58 AM  

the_innkeeper: Bridge #4/12 I-25 over the south Platte, in Denver, has already been replaced. They are finishing lane realignment and putting up the signs.
They could have picked any of the 30 other bridges, like the entire elevated portion of I-70 thru Denver, but they picked Havana?


This.
 
2013-05-28 01:48:13 AM  
blog.texaswisdom.com
 
2013-05-28 03:36:58 AM  
The I Street bridge between Sacramento and West Sacramento. Originally built for the Southern Pacific Railroad. Nowadays, it's the fastest way from North to West Sacramento in rush hour. Made entirely of compressed rust.
 
2013-05-28 10:43:00 AM  
It's kind of shocking, but apparently Missouri is doing something right compared to these other states. Just about all of the crappy, falling down terrifying bridges I can think of in Missouri have either been replaced recently or are scheduled to be replaced shortly. There's a new I-70 bridge going up in St. Louis, a new bridge at Hermann, a new I-70 bridge over the Missouri in St. Charles, a new Hwy 40 bridge being built in Chesterfield, and all of the overpasses on 40 inside of I-270 were completely redone within the last five years.

I have no idea what the score is in Kansas City, but the eastern part of the state seems to be keeping up its infrastructure.
 
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