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(Kansas.com)   It turns out that the polygraph machine might have been the one that was lying   (kansas.com) divider line 44
    More: Ironic, polygraphs, Defense Intelligence Agency, scientific skepticism, Mcclatchy  
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12878 clicks; posted to Main » on 26 May 2013 at 11:24 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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Archived thread
2013-05-26 10:06:17 AM  
9 votes:

t3knomanser: miss diminutive: If I'm ever in a police interrogation I'm just going to stay silent and wait for a lawyer.

That is the only action you can take that won't make things worse for you.


Never trust a police officer.  I'll say it again, louder, because it bears repeating:

NEVER TRUST A POLICE OFFICER.


Their job is to clear the case, not to solve it.  They are, in majority, power-abusing, ego-maniacal assholes with the world's most stressful job, and government pays them to wear all that black leather.  On top of that, the law does not allow them to clear your name.  Ever.  Anything you say to a cop - if it can possibly be construed or even twisted to incriminate you, that's "evidence".  If it clears you, That's "hearsay" and not admissible in court.

It sucks, but that's how it works.

NEVER - EVER - TRUST A POLICE OFFICER.
2013-05-26 10:39:14 AM  
3 votes:
The polygraph is, and always has been a complete fraud.  It is s tool for eliciting confessions from those people that actually believe it is a "lie detector", when it isn't anything of the sort.
2013-05-26 09:46:11 AM  
3 votes:

Earguy: Looking back, it may have been a bluff to see how I reacted, to elicit a confession


That is exactly what polygraphs are for. They are  not meaningful evidence of deception, but people  believe that the device can detect their lies- it's sort of like a placebo effect. Someone who  is lying, and who is told that the machine has detected their lies is more likely to surrender.
2013-05-26 01:36:03 PM  
2 votes:

UNAUTHORIZED FINGER: FTFA: The technical glitch produced errors in the computerized measurements of sweat in one of the most popular polygraphs, the LX4000.

So if you want someone to fail a polygraph, just turn up the thermostat? Sounds legit.


It's a common tactic with cops to turn up the heat anyway. Also, to put you into a chair that's been altered so that you're constantly sliding forward and can't get comfortable. Anything you can think of to make the subject uncomfortable and feel out of sorts. These kinds of stress-inducing tactics are used to try and get the subject to talk in order to make it stop.

Generally, be prepared to listen to them screaming at you and trying to draw you out. Be prepared to shiat yourself and/or piss yourself. Don't let them have any ammo that makes you vulnerable "oh, you have to go to the bathroom? Well, just tell us one thing and you can."

Having narcolepsy helps, too.
2013-05-26 12:28:44 PM  
2 votes:

Benevolent Misanthrope: Jim_Callahan: Benevolent Misanthrope: NEVER - EVER - TRUST A POLICE OFFICER.

That's a bit harsh.

Trusting the cops is fine.  If you're a lost child, they'll get you back to your parents.  If you're getting mugged or robbed, they'll put up the lights and scare your assailant off, if you have a criminal complaint they'll file it for you, etc.  They're not necessarily bad at their jobs and they're no worse people on average than any other blue-collar worker you'll meet.

What you should never do is disclose any personal information to a police officer beyond your name, contact information, and current location to any police officer.  Any problem that the cops cannot solve with that much information about you is not a problem for the police.  Don't tell them where you've been, what you've been doing, or anything about anyone you've encountered.

Well, the thing is... I'm not a child.  If I'm getting mugged or robbed, the crime will be over long before they get there, and if I've been drinking or I look otherwise suspicious to their little one-track brain, I may be arrested myself.  If I have a criminal complaint, they'll give me the form for me to fill out and then file it where it will never see the light of day again.  If I'm in an abusive relationship, and I call them to help me out of a domestic violence situation, and they don't approve of my being gay, they will advise me to get another girlfriend, not help me. (This happened to me.  Twice.  In different cities.)  And speaking of which, as an openly gay person, I've been far more likely to be rousted by cops than helped by them generally, until very recently.  When their departments grudgingly put a few people on paid leave for doing it and told the others some panty-waist DA told them they can't any more.  (Now, I have the added bonus of knowing that, if the cops decide to abuse me for being gay, they'll also plant drugs or otherwise trump something real up to justify it.)

Cops routinely beat citizens, destroy evidence, plant evidence, botch cases, and even shoot victims instead of criminals - and then cover it up.  They may be no worse at their jobs than any blue-collar worker - but your average blue collar worker's mistakes, by and large, do not ruin anyone else's life and do not leave them in the hospital from a gunshot wound or a beating.  Your average blue collar worker is also not in a job that, by definition, is supposed to ensure public safety.

Again:

NEVER - EVER - TRUST A POLICE OFFICER


you people all talk like this, but I tell you what, there's a biiiig difference between a town with enough cops and not enough cops and you always seem to live in the former, not the latter. like it or lump it, police are an important part of a civil polity and y'all should be a bit more grateful.
2013-05-26 12:12:49 PM  
2 votes:
Ah yes, the polygraph.  Rivaled only in accuracy by the scientific method of throwing women in the river to see if they're witches.
2013-05-26 11:39:50 AM  
2 votes:

hardinparamedic: I didn't think Polygraphs could still be used in court?


They can't, but they can be used by the cops in the course of an investigation.

TFA isn't really suggesting some legal change so much as that the use of the machines in investigations probably hurts more than it helps.  Apparently TFA is talking about an actual glitch, but there's also the issue that a stress meter doesn't really tell you much when used under conditions where basically anyone will be having stress spikes.

Not that there's a big difference to be made, since the cops already use profilers, who start out about as good at profiling as an average person guessing blindly and actually get worse with experience as their confidence builds.

Benevolent Misanthrope: NEVER - EVER - TRUST A POLICE OFFICER.


That's a bit harsh.

Trusting the cops is fine.  If you're a lost child, they'll get you back to your parents.  If you're getting mugged or robbed, they'll put up the lights and scare your assailant off, if you have a criminal complaint they'll file it for you, etc.  They're not necessarily bad at their jobs and they're no worse people on average than any other blue-collar worker you'll meet.

What you should never do is disclose any personal information to a police officer beyond your name, contact information, and current location to any police officer.  Any problem that the cops cannot solve with that much information about you is not a problem for the police.  Don't tell them where you've been, what you've been doing, or anything about anyone you've encountered.
2013-05-26 10:22:16 AM  
2 votes:

Benevolent Misanthrope: Their job is to clear the case, not to solve it.


This is the most important element of that. Police want to clear the case, the DA wants to close the case, and they all have the goal of putting someone in jail  as quickly as possible so they can move on to the gigantic backlog facing them.

Even if you have the ultimate Good Guy Greg of cops handling your case,  he still wants to put you in jail. He wouldn't have detained you if he didn't think he could get you into jail. Your only defense is to lawyer up. Lawyering up is not an admission of guilt. Lawyering up isn't going "to make this harder for everyone". Lawyering up makes sure the process proceeds smoothly, and it keeps your cornhole in its original factory condition.
2013-05-26 09:50:24 AM  
2 votes:

t3knomanser: Earguy: Looking back, it may have been a bluff to see how I reacted, to elicit a confession

That is exactly what polygraphs are for. They are  not meaningful evidence of deception, but people  believe that the device can detect their lies- it's sort of like a placebo effect. Someone who  is lying, and who is told that the machine has detected their lies is more likely to surrender.


If I'm ever in a police interrogation I'm just going to stay silent and wait for a lawyer. I get so easily frazzled by those types of situations that I'd be confessing to the Lindbergh baby kidnapping within an hour.
2013-05-26 07:08:21 AM  
2 votes:

hardinparamedic: I didn't think Polygraphs could still be used in court?


That was my understanding as well. I think they're implying police used them to eliminate suspects during an investigation.
2013-05-26 09:08:59 PM  
1 votes:
I am a former PI, criminal investigator and single mother of three boys. After my eperiences in the criminal justice field, I began routinely grabbing my boys, pushing them against the wall and shouting questions at them. They were only allowed to answer calmly in one sentence "I want a lawyer" to every question. They were allowed and encouraged to shiat themselves if possible cause none of my co-workers would stay in a room with that smell for long. They are now in thier 40's and have, each one, had instances to use that advice. They performed beautifully, just like Mami taught them. Of course, the first lesson is never ever do anything illegal, second lesson is not to associate with people who do things illegal and the third lesson is "I want a lawyer".

If you have kids and don't condition them for cop encounters, you are releasing fish into a shark pool.  Even other cops don't trust cops.
2013-05-26 02:25:21 PM  
1 votes:

DoctorOfLove: pueblonative: DoctorOfLove: Again boys and girls, repeat after me:

1. No, officer, I don't know why you pulled me over.
2. I believe I was doing the speed limit.
3. I have not been drinking.

1.  Right on.
2.  True.
3.  Change that to "I'm not drunk" and you got it.  "I have not been drinking" is a factual statement that can be proven or disproven, and if it's disproven you're in even more trouble.

3.  Again, incredibly, and dangerously wrong.  I assume you don't have a dui practice.  Say "officer, I absolutely have not been drinking".  Drunk drivers get convicted of drunk driving, not making false statements.  People lie to cops all the time (in fact, nearly all the time).  The cops know this.  The cop's questions are an IQ test, just to see how stupid (and drunk) you are.


Okay, go ahead and say "I have not been drinking".  I'm sure that's going to really work in your favor when they manage to put the bartender that served you on the stand to testify you'd been at happy hour with an open tab.  You seem to have some weird notion that the jury will go, "well, he did have a BAC of twice the legal limit and was videotaped doing keg stands, but the guy did tell the officer he had not been drinking so I guess he didn't have probable cause."  Lies can be used against you in court; invoking the fifth cannot.
2013-05-26 02:03:12 PM  
1 votes:
Again boys and girls, repeat after me:

1.  No, officer, I don't know why you pulled me over.
2.  I believe I was doing the speed limit.
3.  I have not been drinking.

Then shut up and act respectfully, while being silent.

Also, when you get pulled over,  put your hands on the top of the steering wheel.  Do not fiddle around for your license, insurance whatever.  This way the officer can see that you aren't going to shoot them, and it lowers the cop's blood pressure.  Many (most) cops have been trained to carefully watch the driver in stops (so the cop doesn't get shot) and they will appreciate the gesture.  Hands on top of the wheel.
2013-05-26 02:00:37 PM  
1 votes:

Carousel Beast: Benevolent Misanthrope: OK, having read a few things you're writing today in various threads (mostly about gay folks, maybe you think on that),... you're a gay-baiter. So, I'll bow out, I try not to feed the trolls.

Nice ad hominem. I haven't visited other threads today, but his comment wasn't at all baiting or trollish.

/Perhaps it's you?


Oops - forgot which alt you're signed in as, didja?
2013-05-26 01:33:03 PM  
1 votes:

J. Frank Parnell: UNAUTHORIZED FINGER: FTFA: The technical glitch produced errors in the computerized measurements of sweat in one of the most popular polygraphs, the LX4000.

So if you want someone to fail a polygraph, just turn up the thermostat? Sounds legit.

Alternately, if you want to pass just put a thumbtack in your shoe to cause pain when answering things they know to be true, so any stress caused by lying later will be indistinguishable. But you didn't hear that from me...


Or take a prozac or other medication that causes you to feel no stress.
2013-05-26 01:31:44 PM  
1 votes:

UNAUTHORIZED FINGER: FTFA: The technical glitch produced errors in the computerized measurements of sweat in one of the most popular polygraphs, the LX4000.

So if you want someone to fail a polygraph, just turn up the thermostat? Sounds legit.


Alternately, if you want to pass just put a thumbtack in your shoe to cause pain when answering things they know to be true, so any stress caused by lying later will be indistinguishable. But you didn't hear that from me...
2013-05-26 01:20:30 PM  
1 votes:

pueblonative: noitsnot: pueblonative: hardinparamedic: Also, here's a handy protip tip to add lying to a police officer to the indictment if you get pulled over or are stopped at a DUI Checkpoint: No, officer, I've had nothing but water to drink all day.

FTfY, assuming that the person did have something to drink.  The fifth amendment is the best way to go.

I think that lying to a policeman is not explicitly a crime, but can be considered obstruction of justice if your lie really interferes with them going after something.

Google says many jurisdictions have an "exculpatory no" doctrine, which says you can always deny guilt without penalty. So in the above example, you could say "No I haven't been drinking".

Drinking is not a crime.  So you can say, "no I'm not drunk driving" to the officer, or even "I'm not drunk."  What you can't do, and what I'm objecting to, is tell the officer that you've been only sipping Perrier that day when you've been pounding bloody marys.   And suppose you are found to have a  BAC above the legal limit?  Now you're a liar and drunk.  That's why the wisest course is to not say a goddamned thing.

Of course, that assumes that you're in possession of enough of your facilities in the first place to reasonably and rationally understand the situation.


At any DUI stop, or any other interaction with the police  never never never admit you have been drinking (assuming that's the issue) even if you have a beer in your hand, and even if you just face planted.  never.
The cop is asking the question to get probable cause to either make you do field sobriety tests or just simply arrest you and take you to the station for a breathalizer.

You are not having a friendly conversation.

If they ask you "do you know why I pulled you over?"  the answer is "no officer I don't" because in fact you don't.  Answers like "because I was doing 150 in a 20?" or "because of the dead hooker in my trunk?" are not helpful.

If they ask you "do you know how fast you were going" the answer is always "I believe I was doing the speed limit"

Do not ever admit anything to a cop.  They are attempting the establish probable cause and get you to admit crimes and violations so that prosecuting you is that much easier.

Absolutely positively NEVER admit to drinking.  "No officer, I have not been drinking."  You admit to one beer 12 hours ago, and you are on your way to a DUI.
2013-05-26 01:18:28 PM  
1 votes:

t3knomanser: Intelligent people tend to make terrible cops. It's a tedious, repetitive job. It's just not a good fit for intelligent people.


That's what they claim they don't want people with high IQs for, but intelligent people happily work much more repetitive and tedious jobs. Almost gravitating to certain ones. It makes more sense that intelligent people would question orders and be less predictable.

/Thinking for yourself is a no-no.
//Give yourself to the hive mind.
2013-05-26 01:14:51 PM  
1 votes:
I took a polygraph as part of obtaining a security clearance.  I had problems with questions asking if I had ever stolen or shared state secrets with agents of other governments, but had zero problems with the questions regarding theft.

At the time of the test I had never left the country, never been privy to any state secrets, and never met any agents of other governments, so I had no idea why I was failing those questions.

Now if I had failed the questions around theft, there are some things in my past that would have justified it. But of course I breezed through those questions.

I walked out of that test with less respect for polygraphs then when I entered.
2013-05-26 01:12:39 PM  
1 votes:

autopsybeverage: See my post above. They probably wanted someone dumber and less fit.


Intelligent people tend to make terrible cops. It's a tedious, repetitive job. It's just not a good fit for intelligent people.
2013-05-26 01:11:25 PM  
1 votes:
Never trust the cops, except with guns. They are totally the only people we can trust with guns.

/Because i feel completely safe being outgunned by the same cops that are going to fark me over if it means an easy win on their case.
//The cops are NOT your friends.
2013-05-26 01:07:04 PM  
1 votes:

RedPhoenix122: I wonder if the police department I applied for and failed the polygraph for uses the same machine, because I know for a fact I didn't lie.


See my post above. They probably wanted someone dumber and less fit.
2013-05-26 12:51:18 PM  
1 votes:

jake_lex: ManRay: Molavian: ManRay: Best polygraph ever.
NSFW language.

That is f*cking great.

The creator of The Wire swears that scene was based on something that actually happened.

Yeah, David Simon first mentioned the story in his book "Homicide: A Year On The Killing Streets", which, if you liked either the "Homicide" TV seies or "The Wire", you have absolutely no excuse to have not read.


Yeah, that legend has been around since at least the 1960s.
2013-05-26 12:46:40 PM  
1 votes:

hardinparamedic: pueblonative: Somebody needs to info the state legislatures of this country, cause I'm not seeing any requirement of an oath.

That's filing a false report, or knowingly giving false information in the course of a criminal investigation with the intent to mislead investigators or abet the escape of a fugitive.

It does not apply to "Did you have anything to drink"

If you ever notice, the cops sound like they're reading from a script when they do a DUI checkpoint questionare for a reason, and it's not because they're too dumb to think of original questions to ask.


Giving False Information to the police:


To prove the offense of Giving False Information Concerning the Commission of a Crime ("Lying to Police"), the prosecution must establish the following five elements beyond a reasonable doubt:


1. The accused knowingly gave information about the alleged commission of a crime;

2. The accused knew the information was false;

3. The accused gave the false information to a person;


4. The person to whom the information was given was a law enforcement officer;

5. The accused knew that the person was a law enforcement officer.



Under Florida law, Giving False Information to Police, or "Lying to Police," is a first degree misdemeanor, with penalties of up to 365 days in jail. However, if the false information concerns the commission of a capital felony, the offense may be classified as a third degree felony, with penalties that may include up to 5 years in prison.



Now, I'm just a bit slow this morning, but the words written report and oath appear nowhere in those elements.  I guess you could slide by claiming in your drunken stupor you had accidentally wandered onto the set of a crime drama, though.
2013-05-26 12:36:47 PM  
1 votes:
If 'lie detectors' were reliable they would replace the entire justice system.

Future generations are going to look back on them like we do Scientologists e-meters.
2013-05-26 12:33:30 PM  
1 votes:

willfullyobscure: you people all talk like this, but I tell you what, there's a biiiig difference between a town with enough cops and not enough cops and you always seem to live in the former, not the latter. like it or lump it, police are an important part of a civil polity and y'all should be a bit more grateful.


I'm one of the most pro-LE FARKers on this website, take a LOT of abuse for explaining why certain things are done the way they are, and even I'll tell you that if you are arrested for a crime you did not commit, or even if you did, the first thing you do is lawyer up.

You WILL get railroaded by an overzealous prosecutor in most areas. ANd in urban areas, cops are under pressure to close criminal cases.
2013-05-26 12:31:36 PM  
1 votes:

willfullyobscure: you people all talk like this, but I tell you what, there's a biiiig difference between a town with enough cops and not enough cops and you always seem to live in the former, not the latter. like it or lump it, police are an important part of a civil polity and y'all should be a bit more grateful.


What does quantity have to do with a cop using his badge as an excuse to go minority bash?  I don't care if it's New York or Timfarktu, any town with that cop has one cop too many.
2013-05-26 12:18:02 PM  
1 votes:

Jim_Callahan: Benevolent Misanthrope: NEVER - EVER - TRUST A POLICE OFFICER.

That's a bit harsh.

Trusting the cops is fine.  If you're a lost child, they'll get you back to your parents.  If you're getting mugged or robbed, they'll put up the lights and scare your assailant off, if you have a criminal complaint they'll file it for you, etc.  They're not necessarily bad at their jobs and they're no worse people on average than any other blue-collar worker you'll meet.

What you should never do is disclose any personal information to a police officer beyond your name, contact information, and current location to any police officer.  Any problem that the cops cannot solve with that much information about you is not a problem for the police.  Don't tell them where you've been, what you've been doing, or anything about anyone you've encountered.


Well, the thing is... I'm not a child.  If I'm getting mugged or robbed, the crime will be over long before they get there, and if I've been drinking or I look otherwise suspicious to their little one-track brain, I may be arrested myself.  If I have a criminal complaint, they'll give me the form for me to fill out and then file it where it will never see the light of day again.  If I'm in an abusive relationship, and I call them to help me out of a domestic violence situation, and they don't approve of my being gay, they will advise me to get another girlfriend, not help me. (This happened to me.  Twice.  In different cities.)  And speaking of which, as an openly gay person, I've been far more likely to be rousted by cops than helped by them generally, until very recently.  When their departments grudgingly put a few people on paid leave for doing it and told the others some panty-waist DA told them they can't any more.  (Now, I have the added bonus of knowing that, if the cops decide to abuse me for being gay, they'll also plant drugs or otherwise trump something real up to justify it.)

Cops routinely beat citizens, destroy evidence, plant evidence, botch cases, and even shoot victims instead of criminals - and then cover it up.  They may be no worse at their jobs than any blue-collar worker - but your average blue collar worker's mistakes, by and large, do not ruin anyone else's life and do not leave them in the hospital from a gunshot wound or a beating.  Your average blue collar worker is also not in a job that, by definition, is supposed to ensure public safety.

Again:

NEVER - EVER - TRUST A POLICE OFFICER
2013-05-26 12:15:30 PM  
1 votes:

pueblonative: Ah yes, the polygraph.  Rivaled only in accuracy by the scientific method of throwing women in the river to see if they're witches.


Well throwing them in the river is unnecessary, We can use my larger scales.
2013-05-26 12:14:44 PM  
1 votes:
Why there was ever any doubt as to the thoroughness of the polygraph as pseudoscience I'll never understand.  To me, it's not about police abuse of power so much as it is an industry protecting its own bottom line, kind of like the homeopathic "medicine" industry. If the polygraph had any basis in reality those kind of flaws FTA would have been exposed widely and openly discussed, not dismissed with "uh, no comment, national security".  The polygraph is junk, plain and simple.

I love the circular reasoning, too:
"Tommy Thompson, spokesman for the Phoenix Police Department, said his polygraphers had "over 60 years of experience collectively" and added that "no disparities have ever been noticed." Others said they thought supervisors would catch any error before it had a significant impact on a test."

Right.  As if they even have the minimum facilities to identify a discrepancy.
2013-05-26 12:05:15 PM  
1 votes:
The very first line in that "article" shows me the reporter has no idea what they are talking about. Big surprise, I know.
2013-05-26 12:04:15 PM  
1 votes:
What do you expect from the guy who created Wonder Woman?

4.bp.blogspot.com

www.saturdayeveningpost.com

It was all just his clever ploy to tie more females up, this time in the guise of Science.
2013-05-26 11:50:05 AM  
1 votes:
There is no such thing as a lie detector.
What there is, is this thing called a polygraph, or hocus pocus for a better word.
A polygraph is a device used to fool, intimidate, terrorize and generally fark with the unsuspecting, hopefully to the point of utter confusion and collapse.
Voila! A "confession".
2013-05-26 11:46:18 AM  
1 votes:
LAUGHTER OL anyone who does the use of the polygraph for any of the reasons is the quack. If you are the person who uses this at the workplace you deserve the shooting.
2013-05-26 11:46:14 AM  
1 votes:
Overlooked here, but that story comes from the McClatchy papers' Washington bureau, one of the last bastions of cutting edge journalism. It was the McClatchy staff that was asking the tough questions of Bush and Rummy in the months leading up to the Iraq war -- like where is the real evidence of WMDs -- and sadly the nation wasn't paying attention.
2013-05-26 11:41:36 AM  
1 votes:
The polygraph has never been 'accurate' at anything but its intended function: measuring changes in electrical activity, blood pressure, respiration, etc.

This box has NEVER been able to 'tell when you are lying'. EVER. And they are fairly easily fooled.

Sadly, not too many folks actually know this. Although it mystifies me, personally, how they can't. FFS, they made a Mythbusters episode out of it.
2013-05-26 11:38:08 AM  
1 votes:
ANY result from a polygraph is inaccurate.

It's primary benefit to law enforcement is psychological in that they can dupe ignorant suspects into believing the results are accurate and can "reveal" lies, or simply intimidate them into a confession.

Other than that, lie detectiors are well-documented as merely bullshiat machines.
2013-05-26 11:33:34 AM  
1 votes:

miss diminutive: t3knomanser: Earguy: Looking back, it may have been a bluff to see how I reacted, to elicit a confession

That is exactly what polygraphs are for. They are  not meaningful evidence of deception, but people  believe that the device can detect their lies- it's sort of like a placebo effect. Someone who  is lying, and who is told that the machine has detected their lies is more likely to surrender.

If I'm ever in a police interrogation I'm just going to stay silent and wait for a lawyer. I get so easily frazzled by those types of situations that I'd be confessing to the Lindbergh baby kidnapping within an hour.


I get so outraged when Im accused of something I didnt do that Id probably fail because the needle would be going off the chart because Im ready to choke someone for thinking I could do whatever I was accused of.
2013-05-26 11:22:49 AM  
1 votes:

Benevolent Misanthrope: t3knomanser: miss diminutive: If I'm ever in a police interrogation I'm just going to stay silent and wait for a lawyer.

That is the only action you can take that won't make things worse for you.

Never trust a police officer.  I'll say it again, louder, because it bears repeating:

NEVER TRUST A POLICE OFFICER.

Their job is to clear the case, not to solve it.  They are, in majority, power-abusing, ego-maniacal assholes with the world's most stressful job, and government pays them to wear all that black leather.  On top of that, the law does not allow them to clear your name.  Ever.  Anything you say to a cop - if it can possibly be construed or even twisted to incriminate you, that's "evidence".  If it clears you, That's "hearsay" and not admissible in court.

It sucks, but that's how it works.

NEVER - EVER - TRUST A POLICE OFFICER.


This has been posted here before, Don't Talk to the Police.
2013-05-26 10:56:11 AM  
1 votes:

Benevolent Misanthrope: t3knomanser: miss diminutive: If I'm ever in a police interrogation I'm just going to stay silent and wait for a lawyer.

That is the only action you can take that won't make things worse for you.

Never trust a police officer.  I'll say it again, louder, because it bears repeating:

NEVER TRUST A POLICE OFFICER.

Their job is to clear the case, not to solve it.  They are, in majority, power-abusing, ego-maniacal assholes with the world's most stressful job, and government pays them to wear all that black leather.  On top of that, the law does not allow them to clear your name.  Ever.  Anything you say to a cop - if it can possibly be construed or even twisted to incriminate you, that's "evidence".  If it clears you, That's "hearsay" and not admissible in court.

It sucks, but that's how it works.

NEVER - EVER - TRUST A POLICE OFFICER.


If you're arrested, you do two things.

Don't fight and resist. Don't give them a reason to kick your ass, even if you KNOW you're in the right. And don't give them any ammunition to use against you for BS.

Number two is don't say a farking word. If you're mirandized, tell them you're exercising your right to STFU. Period. Ask for your lawyer. Do not believe any promises a cop makes to you regarding charges, or dropping them. Remember, until you ask for a lawyer, they can BS you for up to 24 hours.

Also, here's a handy protip if you get pulled over or are stopped at a DUI Checkpoint: No, officer, I've had nothing but water to drink all day.
2013-05-26 10:18:24 AM  
1 votes:

Benevolent Misanthrope: t3knomanser: miss diminutive: If I'm ever in a police interrogation I'm just going to stay silent and wait for a lawyer.

That is the only action you can take that won't make things worse for you.

Never trust a police officer.  I'll say it again, louder, because it bears repeating:

NEVER TRUST A POLICE OFFICER.

Their job is to clear the case, not to solve it.  They are, in majority, power-abusing, ego-maniacal assholes with the world's most stressful job, and government pays them to wear all that black leather.  On top of that, the law does not allow them to clear your name.  Ever.  Anything you say to a cop - if it can possibly be construed or even twisted to incriminate you, that's "evidence".  If it clears you, That's "hearsay" and not admissible in court.

It sucks, but that's how it works.

NEVER - EVER - TRUST A POLICE OFFICER.


My ex-wife worked as a victim/witness counselor in a prosecutor's office. She gave me the exact same advice. No matter if you're innocent with an iron-clad alibi, never, ever talk to the police without a lawyer. It's one of the few pieces of advice she gave me that I actually will take if I'm ever in that situation.
2013-05-26 09:27:46 AM  
1 votes:
I'm sure they are every bit as accurate as drug dogs.
2013-05-26 08:31:38 AM  
1 votes:

hardinparamedic: I didn't think Polygraphs could still be used in court?


Cops step up to the plate and tell lies instead.
2013-05-26 06:28:29 AM  
1 votes:
I didn't think Polygraphs could still be used in court?
 
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