Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(LiveLeak)   Why you don't ship your car on a Russian freighter in rough winter seas, unless you're looking for a payout from your insurance company   (liveleak.com ) divider line
    More: Scary, Russians  
•       •       •

8666 clicks; posted to Video » on 26 May 2013 at 8:15 AM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



53 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all

 
2013-05-26 12:24:49 AM  
Perhaps their mission in life is to serve as a warning to others. All aboard the FAILBOAT!
 
2013-05-26 12:46:07 AM  
Were the vehicles not secured at all?  Jeez.
 
2013-05-26 12:49:20 AM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: Were the vehicles not secured at all? Jeez.


Not only were they not secured, no emergency brakes seemed to be in use. BRILLIANT!
 
2013-05-26 08:10:24 AM  
There are 2" tie down straps laying everywhere.  Those things only have a working load limit of around 3,000 lbs.  They probably didn't use enough and when one broke loose, it started a domino effect.
 
2013-05-26 08:12:50 AM  
It looks like they were strapped down at one point.  Those appear to be straps on the deck.  There doesn't appear there was ever safety rails.
 
2013-05-26 08:22:58 AM  
Do not watch that video if you have Vertigo.
 
2013-05-26 08:34:28 AM  

EvilEgg: It looks like they were strapped down at one point.  Those appear to be straps on the deck.  There doesn't appear there was ever safety rails.


That's what I noticed.  No rails, no gunwales, no nothing to keep people or things from rolling off the deck.

Unless, of course, they've already been knocked overboard.
 
2013-05-26 09:11:37 AM  
That looks to me like a boat (tanker?) that was never designed to carry things on its deck. No rails, no gunwales, scuppers, etc.

It was an angry sea that day lads.
 
2013-05-26 09:15:44 AM  
I shipped two cars from Australia to the states. Mine were shipped inside a  container but the insurance was almost worthless at sea. If they dropped the container in the water pier side I was screwed but if it hit the pier I was OK! Luckily there were no issues and the cars made it here just fine. Getting them titled here was real fun!
 
2013-05-26 09:29:42 AM  
Even if the straps had held,  nothing worse for a car than a prolonged period of salt spray.
 
2013-05-26 09:35:48 AM  
Reminds me of when I played with my brother's model cars when I was a kid.
 
2013-05-26 09:41:50 AM  
That horizon, ugghhhhhh....
 
2013-05-26 10:23:17 AM  
Bumper cars at sea! Brilliant idea for crew recreation and amusement.

Hope the shipping line claused those bills of lading properly "Shipped on deck at shippers risk".

Nylon straps from the Yokahama U-haul store, all righty then.

This put a dent in Putin's plan to populate Siberia with right-hand drive cars.

It happens even on purpose-built ro-ro's with disastrous results when multiplied by x 1000 :

encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com
 
2013-05-26 10:32:35 AM  

BenJammin: Even if the straps had held,  nothing worse for a car than a prolonged period of salt spray.


I'm assuming that these were cars that had been damaged during the tsunami and were going to be sold to unsuspecting Russians.

From the wide-open deck space, I'm wondering if this is a container ship.  Tankers would have too much in the way of pipes/valves/manifolds/etc. on deck.
 
2013-05-26 10:38:26 AM  
web.mit.edu
 
2013-05-26 10:44:09 AM  
At 0:44 or so you can see what looks to be a white pickup (or something white) going over the rail.  I was hoping for a lot more of that!
 
2013-05-26 10:54:55 AM  
A little touch-up paint, they'll be good as new.
 
2013-05-26 11:09:54 AM  

roadkillontheweb: I shipped two cars from Australia to the states. Mine were shipped inside a  container but the insurance was almost worthless at sea. If they dropped the container in the water pier side I was screwed but if it hit the pier I was OK! Luckily there were no issues and the cars made it here just fine. Getting them titled here was real fun!


Damn. How much sid that cost? And how long did it take?
 
2013-05-26 11:25:14 AM  
Lets strap those cars down, boys.


Sir, your automobile is at the bottom of the ocean. is there anything else i can help you with??
 
2013-05-26 11:26:34 AM  

BenJammin: Even if the straps had held,  nothing worse for a car than a prolonged period of salt spray.



at this point, the salt is the least of their worries.  but true.
 
2013-05-26 11:27:32 AM  

Warmachine999: At 0:44 or so you can see what looks to be a white pickup (or something white) going over the rail.  I was hoping for a lot more of that!



yea, destruction and loss/waste is almost orgasmic.
 
2013-05-26 11:31:15 AM  
encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com
 
2013-05-26 11:32:54 AM  
Also, will this show up on Carfax?
 
2013-05-26 11:37:26 AM  

Gough: BenJammin: Even if the straps had held,  nothing worse for a car than a prolonged period of salt spray.

I'm assuming that these were cars that had been damaged during the tsunami and were going to be sold to unsuspecting Russians.

From the wide-open deck space, I'm wondering if this is a container ship.  Tankers would have too much in the way of pipes/valves/manifolds/etc. on deck.


If it was to sell to unsuspecting folks, then this was poetic justice.
 
2013-05-26 11:39:31 AM  

Anschauer: ro-ro'


you seem to know what you are talking about.
what happened with that ship in the pic?
 
2013-05-26 11:45:12 AM  
Looks like stoner demolition derby.
 
2013-05-26 12:07:52 PM  

duenor: Anschauer: ro-ro'

you seem to know what you are talking about.
what happened with that ship in the pic?


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MV_Cougar_Ace hauling Mazdas had a ballast problem in 2006. Most of the cars survived but ended up being scrapped anyway because Mazda did not want to be seen as selling suspect cars.

http://www.wired.com/science/discoveries/magazine/16-03/ff_seacowboy s? currentPage=all
 
2013-05-26 01:30:36 PM  
Ehhh, that'll buff right out.
 
2013-05-26 01:38:31 PM  

nytmare: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MV_Cougar_Ace hauling Mazdas had a ballast problem in 2006. Most of the cars survived but ended up being scrapped anyway because Mazda did not want to be seen as selling suspect cars.


And this is the reason Mazda stays at the top of my to-buy list if they have anything in the size/class I need to fill.  (Miata, Mazda 3, CX5)
 
2013-05-26 01:47:43 PM  

thisiszombocom: roadkillontheweb: I shipped two cars from Australia to the states. Mine were shipped inside a  container but the insurance was almost worthless at sea. If they dropped the container in the water pier side I was screwed but if it hit the pier I was OK! Luckily there were no issues and the cars made it here just fine. Getting them titled here was real fun!

Damn. How much sid that cost? And how long did it take?


About 5 grand and almost 2 months. Was worth it in books since the cars are very rare and were never made here in the states.
 
2013-05-26 02:55:40 PM  

darch: That looks to me like a boat (tanker?) that was never designed to carry things on its deck. No rails, no gunwales, scuppers, etc.

It was an angry sea that day lads.


...like an old man trying to send back soup in a deli.
 
2013-05-26 03:10:51 PM  
Duenor:

Ro-Ro's are like cruise ships - too much on top and too little on the bottom.

Both have to resort to special efforts to maintain stability.

You might be surprised how many sea-going, commercially-classed vessels capsize and sink each year and many of them are attributable to cargo shifting.

That ship in the video looks like a small container-bulker. There are no sockets for containers visible and with the wide hatches it's probably something around 8-12,000 deadweight.

A very good site maintained by a professional and visited by us in the business is:
http://gcaptain.com/are-roros-safe/

If you get off on this stuff the grandaddy of them all is Countryman and McDaniel but dont blame me for losing the next 5 hours of your life:

http://www.cargolaw.com/2009nightmare_ioannis.html#the-feature
 
2013-05-26 03:39:11 PM  
unchellmatt:

web.mit.edu
How does one unload that thing?
 
2013-05-26 04:24:50 PM  

RoyBatty: unchellmatt:

[web.mit.edu image 320x219]
How does one unload that thing?


From the left.
 
2013-05-26 04:47:07 PM  

unchellmatt: [web.mit.edu image 640x437]


That had to have been one damned expensive "damaged during shipment" write-off for all the poor customers whose cargo was in those containers. And all the insurance carriers involved probably did one massive joint double-facepalm... right before informing the shipping line that owned the ship that they were about to get one great big honking bill for lost and damaged cargo.
 
2013-05-26 05:00:03 PM  

Gough: BenJammin: Even if the straps had held,  nothing worse for a car than a prolonged period of salt spray.

I'm assuming that these were cars that had been damaged during the tsunami and were going to be sold to unsuspecting Russians.



Possibly, but not necessarily.  From what I understand, you virtually never see a car on the road there that is more than five or six years old.  Apparently, the road taxes there are structured so that after five years after manufacture it becomes almost prohibitively expensive to keep the car on the road.  Occasionally the Japanese government makes some half-assed attempt at justifying the laws for environmental or safety reasons, but it's generally accepted that it's a handout to the auto industry.

While no doubt there are vintage car enthusiasts and collectors over there that can afford to keep their old cars, this whole arrangement leaves them with a huge surplus of not-very-old used cars that, for all intents and purposes, are basicaly undriveable in Japan.  So you see Russian auto brokers buying these used cars up at auction and shipping them over to the Russian far east to sell to the folks out there in Vladivostok and Khabarovsk and the like.  I would presume it's probably cheaper to do that than it is to have them shipped all the way across the continent from Volgograd or Nizhniy Novgorod or wherever it is that GAZ and AvtoVAZ have their factories.
 
2013-05-26 06:05:16 PM  
Next up on Fox, when Demolition Derby meets Russian Roulette, only one survives.
 
2013-05-26 06:12:28 PM  

Robo Beat: Gough: BenJammin: Even if the straps had held,  nothing worse for a car than a prolonged period of salt spray.

I'm assuming that these were cars that had been damaged during the tsunami and were going to be sold to unsuspecting Russians.


Possibly, but not necessarily.  From what I understand, you virtually never see a car on the road there that is more than five or six years old.  Apparently, the road taxes there are structured so that after five years after manufacture it becomes almost prohibitively expensive to keep the car on the road.  Occasionally the Japanese government makes some half-assed attempt at justifying the laws for environmental or safety reasons, but it's generally accepted that it's a handout to the auto industry.

While no doubt there are vintage car enthusiasts and collectors over there that can afford to keep their old cars, this whole arrangement leaves them with a huge surplus of not-very-old used cars that, for all intents and purposes, are basicaly undriveable in Japan.  So you see Russian auto brokers buying these used cars up at auction and shipping them over to the Russian far east to sell to the folks out there in Vladivostok and Khabarovsk and the like.  I would presume it's probably cheaper to do that than it is to have them shipped all the way across the continent from Volgograd or Nizhniy Novgorod or wherever it is that GAZ and AvtoVAZ have their factories.


Yes.   When I lived in Auckland I did some part time work unloading ships carrying cars from Japan.  A new ship full of cars arrived nearly everyday and used Japanese cars can be bought pretty cheap.  Everything you said was how it was explained to me at the time.  I'd love to have one shipped over to Korea.  They are usually really cheap but still in great condition.
 
2013-05-26 06:22:39 PM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: Were the vehicles not secured at all?  Jeez.


Doesn't look like it.  Obviously union work as incompetence and laziness are requirements for all their workers.
 
2013-05-26 07:53:04 PM  

roadkillontheweb: I shipped two cars from Australia to the states. Mine were shipped inside a  container but the insurance was almost worthless at sea. If they dropped the container in the water pier side I was screwed but if it hit the pier I was OK! Luckily there were no issues and the cars made it here just fine. Getting them titled here was real fun!


Unless they were Veyrons wouldn't it have been cheaper to just buy a car over there?
 
2013-05-26 08:04:57 PM  
Some settling of contents may have occurred.
 
2013-05-26 08:05:30 PM  

Linux_Yes: yea, destruction and loss/waste is almost orgasmic.


Can't we just call it an artificial reef, write it off on our taxes, and go about our business?
 
2013-05-26 09:09:40 PM  

Scruffinator: Linux_Yes: yea, destruction and loss/waste is almost orgasmic.

Can't we just call it an artificial reef, write it off on our taxes, and go about our business?


We were gonna but then some jerk with a video camera....
 
2013-05-26 09:32:12 PM  
Now you know where the term "loose cannon" comes from.
 
2013-05-26 09:57:52 PM  

douchebag/hater: roadkillontheweb: I shipped two cars from Australia to the states. Mine were shipped inside a  container but the insurance was almost worthless at sea. If they dropped the container in the water pier side I was screwed but if it hit the pier I was OK! Luckily there were no issues and the cars made it here just fine. Getting them titled here was real fun!

Unless they were Veyrons wouldn't it have been cheaper to just buy a car over there?


They were antique cars that were only made in Australia. If you want want here in the states, you have to buy one in OZ and have it sipped over here.
 
2013-05-26 10:43:09 PM  
NASCAR in slow motion.
 
2013-05-27 02:02:39 AM  
I found myself wondering at what depth the tires would implode.
 
2013-05-27 02:36:49 AM  

RatMaster999: I found myself wondering at what depth the tires would implode.


About 70ft for a standard 32psi passenger car tire. Every 33ft of depth in sea water is 14.7psi.
 
2013-05-27 02:57:57 AM  
2xhelix

There are 2" tie down straps laying everywhere. Those things only have a working load limit of around 3,000 lbs. They probably didn't use enough and when one broke loose, it started a domino effect.

Yep.

/ Needed chain load binders, not cheap bullsh*t.
 
2013-05-27 03:49:10 AM  
That, and what looks like a coating of ice and snow on the deck.
 
Displayed 50 of 53 comments


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all


View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter








In Other Media
  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report