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(Des Moines Register)   Everyone's used to gas prices climbing up on the Memorial Day weekend, but now they're faced with an even more outrageous increase in meat   (desmoinesregister.com) divider line 77
    More: Followup, gas prices, chicken breasts, wholesale prices, West Des Moines, nursing students  
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5447 clicks; posted to Main » on 25 May 2013 at 12:24 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-25 10:40:52 AM
the greed race accelerates,
 
2013-05-25 12:25:29 PM
Big gas prices.
 
2013-05-25 12:27:45 PM
When the ladies bring out their sun dresses, I have an outrageous increase in meat.
 
2013-05-25 12:27:57 PM
outrageous increase in meat

www.redstaplerchronicles.com
cdn.ghettoredhot.com
 
2013-05-25 12:36:16 PM

hogans: When the ladies bring out their sun dresses, I have an outrageous increase in meat.


Sundresses are the only reason I enjoy march-october
 
2013-05-25 12:37:09 PM
I understand a nice horse-offal blend will reduce costs.
 
2013-05-25 12:39:35 PM
I swear, every time a "insert commodity here" baron sneezes, prices go up. No one should have that much influence over prices.
 
2013-05-25 12:41:01 PM
"Hi, I'm Darren.  I massage the meat here...I'm missing my green, pink, and light blue cause bracelets."

"If you find them in one of your purchases, I'd be eternally grateful if you could return them."

cmsimg.desmoinesregister.com
 
2013-05-25 12:42:31 PM
No pudding, either.
 
2013-05-25 12:47:40 PM
Funny (not ha ha funny) there never seems to be an increase in plastic toys, or plastic mops or anything else made from Petrochemicals.  Only gasoline
Why is that?
Haven't heard a serious answer yet.

Couldn't care less about the meat issue, don't eat enough of it to care.
 
2013-05-25 12:54:55 PM

Marcintosh: Funny (not ha ha funny) there never seems to be an increase in plastic toys, or plastic mops or anything else made from Petrochemicals.  Only gasoline
Why is that?
Haven't heard a serious answer yet.

Couldn't care less about the meat issue, don't eat enough of it to care.


That is actually plausible. Plastic items like action figures or Rubbermaid containers are made from just a few cents' worth of petrochemicals. The cost for those items are the metal tools/molds.

Not saying we aren't being taken to the cleaners on fuel... But it is a pretty different situation.
 
2013-05-25 12:58:42 PM
I would like to now make a crude joke about my increase in meat.
Now I would like to point out that I'm ashamed of taking advantage of the low hanging fruit.
At this point I can't help but mention my increasing meat and how it resembles low hanging fruit.
Thank you for your time.
 
2013-05-25 12:59:38 PM
farm8.staticflickr.com
 
2013-05-25 01:01:22 PM

Marcintosh: Funny (not ha ha funny) there never seems to be an increase in plastic toys, or plastic mops or anything else made from Petrochemicals.  Only gasoline
Why is that?
Haven't heard a serious answer yet.

Couldn't care less about the meat issue, don't eat enough of it to care.


They explained it last night on TV, but something tells me you don't own one.
 
2013-05-25 01:05:54 PM
I guess it depends where you go.

places like Publix here in Florida (or the southeast in general) always have big sales on meat and produce when there's a big holiday going on.

it gets more people in the store who then buy other useless shiat. if you only buy the essentials for a holiday such as memorial day - grilling meats, veggies, buns, maybe some fruit even - you'll do alright. it's all the other shiat you load up in your cart that will drain your wallet. either way the store, vendors, and everyone else are still making money.
 
GCD
2013-05-25 01:08:58 PM
This is one of several reasons I've started to buy locally sourced meat. If the prices are going to rise, I might as well give my money directly to the supplier of the meat, rather than have a large grocery chain cough up pennies on their profits back to the suppliers.

I am fortunate enough to live about 5 minutes from Oulton's Farm in Windsor, Nova Scotia. Any fellow Bluenosers here likely know that Oulton's supplies meats to a lot of the "high end" restaurants in Halifax.

I'm definitely not a "buy local" Nazi like some people are, but I am happy to know where my meat comes from (I can see their beef cow pastures from my patio), their shop is absolutely spotless, my money stays in the community most important of all: their meat is just leaps and bounds tastier than store-bought meat.
 
2013-05-25 01:09:31 PM
Beef prices took a major jump in the 70's, before the gas crunch hit. From what I recall, it was due to an error by the USDA that had more cows slaughtered than necessary.

Within two years, the shortage was gone, but the beef prices did not go down as retailers and producers discovered folks would pay the higher prices. Naturally, as folks turned to traditionally cheaper meats, those prices took off also, especially pork, which became the 'second white meat'.

So folks turned to chicken and fish, to find that poultry prices rose, going more than double with whole birds. That began the practice of breaking up chickens and selling them in bags in sections.

It also allowed for companies to take the less popular parts, like the back and necks, usually used for soup and sell them to companies which made pet foods, processed chicken meats and canned broth.

A win-win situation for the poultry business.
The health and diet crazes hit nearly at the same time and seafood became nearly the Universal Health Food. The price quadrupled almost over night.

So folks turned to vegetables -- with the obvious outcome.

The gas crunch would send costs across the board soaring, for obvious reasons and later, huge amounts of corn would be grabbed to make alcohol fuel with -- as Congress ignored the fact that such fuel can be made from nearly any plant. Corn, however, is a major food crop. Creating a shortage of it affects scores of other foods.

I used to buy 10 ears for $1.00. Now, a sale is usually 2 ears for the same price. American tomatoes doubled in price and then doubled again, which increased the amount of cheaper imports from other nations. The same thing happened to Green Bell Peppers.

At one point the cost of lettuce went so high that restaurants stopped their free salad bars or added a charge.

It was interesting to note that as the average person struggled to feed their families, we were still exporting vast amounts of food to other nations. Another curious note was that canned vegetables, especially cheaper store brands, did not jump as much in price as the fresh versions. Later, canners would add less veggies and make up the weight difference by adding water.

Certain brands of canned Tuna really did this. Probably because Tuna suddenly soared to nearly the price of gold.

Many food companies became more efficient in stopping waste -- like pasta makers discovered they could reclaim pasta from damaged or misprinted boxes that usually would not be sold, just shipped to charities for free. Bones from butcher shops and slaughter houses abruptly had several new markets, from being processed into fertilizers, to pet food, to being sold for soup base to the consumer -- who used to get them free.

At least one company bakes the bones into carbon and provides the result to other companies under the name of Carbon Black, used in art paints, tires and other things.

Others took previously waste sections, cooked them down to get every scrap of meat off and turned out a 'meat base', which would go into meat patties, potted meat food products and show up as processed canned meat spreads.

The oils from the process would be sold to the new bio-fuel companies, along with cosmetic, medical and animal feed makers. The bones went to fertilizer plants and pet food makers.

Again, a win-win situation for everyone except the average Joe trying to feed his family.

Many grocery stores started hiding additional fat on pieces of meat sold packaged, which, since fat conscious consumers cut most of it off and threw it away, turned out to be a good way to get more money from the same bulk beef.

Those chicken parts by the bag? Manufacturers started injecting them with water or broth and even sugar to bulk them up cheaply and later, started leaving on more fat that they used to trim off.

More profit for them.

You might not have noticed, but in many stores you can buy chicken wings by the bag. Drumettes. The previously dirt cheap product soared in price due to the popularity connected with professional sports.

Most bagged bulk wings consist of two parts of the wing. Yet, you can buy wings in Styrofoam trays, at a higher cost per pound, with a third part left on to add weight: the wing tip. Most folks cut those off.

You used to buy a whole chicken at less than $1.00 a pound, included would be the neck, liver, gizzard and heart. A big chunk of fat would be left in the opening because many folks found health benefits in chicken fat.
Now, you get the bird and nothing else at a considerably higher cost. Gizzards and livers are removed, packed in bulk and sold separately. The necks, once used for a soup base, wind up being sold to processing plants which make a scrap meat base to sell to other companies.

So, dealers make considerably more profit off a chicken, yet consumers pay even higher prices than before for less.

One would think that being so efficient with previously waste parts and 'recycling' them, would drop the price of the meat since more profit is being made.

Nope. Not gonna happen.

Often a lot of that scrap meat will find it's way into inexpensive meat patties, sausages and hot dogs, with a large percentage going into pet and farm animal foods.

Buy canned broths? Makers tend to dump about 1000 pounds of previously garbage cuts and bones, bought cheaply in bulk into huge tanks, add water and some seasoning and cook it all down into soup. Then the solids are filtered out and sold to fertilizer and animal feed companies. Fats are skimmed off and sold to fat dealers.

Then the broth is canned and shipped out to stores where you buy it.

At the same time, the popularity of things like beef ribs has soared -- like chicken wings -- that the price for a pack of them can be more than a sirloin steak. Especially during traditional BBQ-ing holidays.

Like with oil, any fart in the wind is used as an excuse to raise the food prices.

Funny, isn't it. In processing we now reclaim and reuse nearly 99% of an animal. Often 100%, when before it would be like 75%. So we're more efficient and less wasteful -- yet we now pay a lot more for food than ever before.

We can even salvage rotting, dead cows from a farmers field, process them and turn out a host of base products from fats and oils to bulk meat pulp and tons of bones. Not fit for human consumption, there is still a major market for this stuff in animal foods, industrial oils, bio-fuels and fertilizer markets.

You'd think all of this additional usage and less waste would drop the food prices. After all, that's more profit to be made from a food animal than ever before.

Nope.
 
2013-05-25 01:18:27 PM

Rik01: Beef prices took a major jump in the 70's, before the gas crunch hit. From what I recall, it was due to an error by the USDA that had more cows slaughtered than necessary. etc.....


I have a modest proposal for you.
 
2013-05-25 01:21:04 PM
Yessir, it's a great time to be vegan.
 
2013-05-25 01:22:18 PM

Rik01: Beef prices took a major jump in the 70's, before the gas crunch hit. From what I recall, it was due to an error by the USDA that had more cows slaughtered than necessary.

Within two years, the shortage was gone, but the beef prices did not go down as retailers and producers discovered folks would pay the higher prices. Naturally, as folks turned to traditionally cheaper meats, those prices took off also, especially pork, which became the 'second white meat'.

So folks turned to chicken and fish, to find that poultry prices rose, going more than double with whole birds. That began the practice of breaking up chickens and selling them in bags in sections.

It also allowed for companies to take the less popular parts, like the back and necks, usually used for soup and sell them to companies which made pet foods, processed chicken meats and canned broth.

A win-win situation for the poultry business.
The health and diet crazes hit nearly at the same time and seafood became nearly the Universal Health Food. The price quadrupled almost over night.

So folks turned to vegetables -- with the obvious outcome.

The gas crunch would send costs across the board soaring, for obvious reasons and later, huge amounts of corn would be grabbed to make alcohol fuel with -- as Congress ignored the fact that such fuel can be made from nearly any plant. Corn, however, is a major food crop. Creating a shortage of it affects scores of other foods.

I used to buy 10 ears for $1.00. Now, a sale is usually 2 ears for the same price. American tomatoes doubled in price and then doubled again, which increased the amount of cheaper imports from other nations. The same thing happened to Green Bell Peppers.

At one point the cost of lettuce went so high that restaurants stopped their free salad bars or added a charge.

It was interesting to note that as the average person struggled to feed their families, we were still exporting vast amounts of food to other nations. Another curious note was that canned vegetables, especially cheaper store brands, did not jump as much in price as the fresh versions. Later, canners would add less veggies and make up the weight difference by adding water.

Certain brands of canned Tuna really did this. Probably because Tuna suddenly soared to nearly the price of gold.

Many food companies became more efficient in stopping waste -- like pasta makers discovered they could reclaim pasta from damaged or misprinted boxes that usually would not be sold, just shipped to charities for free. Bones from butcher shops and slaughter houses abruptly had several new markets, from being processed into fertilizers, to pet food, to being sold for soup base to the consumer -- who used to get them free.

At least one company bakes the bones into carbon and provides the result to other companies under the name of Carbon Black, used in art paints, tires and other things.

Others took previously waste sections, cooked them down to get every scrap of meat off and turned out a 'meat base', which would go into meat patties, potted meat food products and show up as processed canned meat spreads.

The oils from the process would be sold to the new bio-fuel companies, along with cosmetic, medical and animal feed makers. The bones went to fertilizer plants and pet food makers.

Again, a win-win situation for everyone except the average Joe trying to feed his family.

Many grocery stores started hiding additional fat on pieces of meat sold packaged, which, since fat conscious consumers cut most of it off and threw it away, turned out to be a good way to get more money from the same bulk beef.

Those chicken parts by the bag? Manufacturers started injecting them with water or broth and even sugar to bulk them up cheaply and later, started leaving on more fat that they used to trim off.

More profit for them.

You might not have noticed, but in many stores you can buy chicken wings by the bag. Drumettes. The previously dirt cheap product soared in price due to the popularity connected with professional sports.

Most bagged bulk wings consist of two parts of the wing. Yet, you can buy wings in Styrofoam trays, at a higher cost per pound, with a third part left on to add weight: the wing tip. Most folks cut those off.

You used to buy a whole chicken at less than $1.00 a pound, included would be the neck, liver, gizzard and heart. A big chunk of fat would be left in the opening because many folks found health benefits in chicken fat.
Now, you get the bird and nothing else at a considerably higher cost. Gizzards and livers are removed, packed in bulk and sold separately. The necks, once used for a soup base, wind up being sold to processing plants which make a scrap meat base to sell to other companies.

So, dealers make considerably more profit off a chicken, yet consumers pay even higher prices than before for less.

One would think that being so efficient with previously waste parts and 'recycling' them, would drop the price of the meat since more profit is being made.

Nope. Not gonna happen.

Often a lot of that scrap meat will find it's way into inexpensive meat patties, sausages and hot dogs, with a large percentage going into pet and farm animal foods.

Buy canned broths? Makers tend to dump about 1000 pounds of previously garbage cuts and bones, bought cheaply in bulk into huge tanks, add water and some seasoning and cook it all down into soup. Then the solids are filtered out and sold to fertilizer and animal feed companies. Fats are skimmed off and sold to fat dealers.

Then the broth is canned and shipped out to stores where you buy it.

At the same time, the popularity of things like beef ribs has soared -- like chicken wings -- that the price for a pack of them can be more than a sirloin steak. Especially during traditional BBQ-ing holidays.

Like with oil, any fart in the wind is used as an excuse to raise the food prices.

Funny, isn't it. In processing we now reclaim and reuse nearly 99% of an animal. Often 100%, when before it would be like 75%. So we're more efficient and less wasteful -- yet we now pay a lot more for food than ever before.

We can even salvage rotting, dead cows from a farmers field, process them and turn out a host of base products from fats and oils to bulk meat pulp and tons of bones. Not fit for human consumption, there is still a major market for this stuff in animal foods, industrial oils, bio-fuels and fertilizer markets.

You'd think all of this additional usage and less waste would drop the food prices. After all, that's more profit to be made from a food animal than ever before.

Nope.


Would the cost shoot up because now instead of having one guy put a chicken in a bag you have a second guy who takes one chicken and cuts it up. And now a machine is bought to take the bones and turn them into paints?

I'm just asking. Eventually machines will take over and we will be fighting wars on the moon. But we'll need guys who can fix those machines.
 
2013-05-25 01:22:46 PM

Louisiana_Sitar_Club: I would like to now make a crude joke about my increase in meat.
Now I would like to point out that I'm ashamed of taking advantage of the low hanging fruit.
At this point I can't help but mention my increasing meat and how it resembles low hanging fruit.
Thank you for your time.


So you're saying you're a grower, not a shower?
 
2013-05-25 01:25:32 PM

autopsybeverage: Yessir, it's a great time to be vegan.


What's  vegan?

No, really, what can you buy nowadays aside from raw fruits/vegetables/grains that you can know for certain has no animal product in it?
 
2013-05-25 01:28:04 PM
[Newsflash] Comedian John Pinette has committed suicide on news of high meat prices
 
2013-05-25 01:29:59 PM

hervatski: Would the cost shoot up because now instead of having one guy put a chicken in a bag you have a second guy who takes one chicken and cuts it up. And now a machine is bought to take the bones and turn them into paints?

I'm just asking. Eventually machines will take over and we will be fighting wars on the moon. But we'll need guys who can fix those machines.


How do you think those things would affect supply? Or demand?

I'm just asking.
 
2013-05-25 01:34:38 PM
Hope they don't run out.

ninjamonkey.us
 
2013-05-25 01:37:11 PM
My meat increases frequently.
 
2013-05-25 01:37:36 PM
My mother often complains about the price of milk, because she grew up in an era (and a part of the country) in which dairy products were cheap and plentiful to a degree that they came to be viewed as staples.

Once or twice I tried to gently remind her that it's bizarre for humans to consume the mother's milk of another species in the first place, but of course that fell on deaf ears. No human being needs to consume animal flesh or dairy products - it's a choice. Of course, food is such an integral part of culture, that's not an easy thing to change, but more so today than ever, it can be done.
 
2013-05-25 01:38:12 PM
If I've said it once I've said it 1000 times: Why are we turning food (i.e. corn) into ethanol fuel when the ethanol, or methanol, can be made from other sources?  Use the corn for feed so that we can get our poultry and cattle numbers back up to where they were prior to 2009.
 
2013-05-25 01:47:10 PM

GCD: This is one of several reasons I've started to buy locally sourced meat. If the prices are going to rise, I might as well give my money directly to the supplier of the meat, rather than have a large grocery chain cough up pennies on their profits back to the suppliers.

I am fortunate enough to live about 5 minutes from Oulton's Farm in Windsor, Nova Scotia. Any fellow Bluenosers here likely know that Oulton's supplies meats to a lot of the "high end" restaurants in Halifax.

I'm definitely not a "buy local" Nazi like some people are, but I am happy to know where my meat comes from (I can see their beef cow pastures from my patio), their shop is absolutely spotless, my money stays in the community most important of all: their meat is just leaps and bounds tastier than store-bought meat.


Pretty much this. Also, my local butcher sells parts that are way cheap, good for broths and stews.
 
2013-05-25 01:47:50 PM
4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-05-25 01:59:17 PM
My family is literally going semi vegan due to the price of meat and animal products. I can't afford to buy groceries for the month and I am not services the sludge they call hot dogs etc.

So we are going bean and lentils.

Sorry animal products, its cheaper to raise it and not feed it to something else.

Still LOVE meat... not happening here.
 
2013-05-25 02:02:14 PM
I am going to go give my wife an increase in meat.
 
2013-05-25 02:05:52 PM
Capitalism. Is there anything it can't do besides lower consumer prices?
 
2013-05-25 02:05:59 PM

Ima4nic8or: I am going to go give my wife an increase in meat.


What's the lucky guy's name?
 
2013-05-25 02:08:26 PM
imgon.net
 
2013-05-25 02:12:16 PM

mmagdalene:
Once or twice I tried to gently remind her that it's bizarre for humans to consume the mother's milk of another species in the first place, but of course that fell on deaf ears. No human being needs to consume animal flesh or dairy products - it's a choice. Of course, food is such an integral part of culture, that's not an easy thing to change, but more so today than ever, it can be done.


But Velveeta is OK, right?
 
2013-05-25 02:14:58 PM
$5.00 for a pkg of franks. Not no but hell no! That conglomeration of pork, chicken and beef gristle. waste products pureed into a pink sludge and gel'd into tube shapes. Sure, I don't think so. Who the fark do these corporations think they're dealing with.
 
2013-05-25 02:23:17 PM
I think we're overlooking the obvious solution. There's lots of meat walking around on two legs. Of course, we'd start with the vegans and vegetarians, as I hear herbivore meat tastes better
 
2013-05-25 02:32:44 PM

panfried: $5.00 for a pkg of franks. Not no but hell no! That conglomeration of pork, chicken and beef gristle. waste products pureed into a pink sludge and gel'd into tube shapes. Sure, I don't think so. Who the fark do these corporations think they're dealing with.


Speaking of, the "March against Monsanto" is happening today worldwide. It seems people have had enough with eating science experiments and paying out the ass for it...
 
2013-05-25 02:34:34 PM
Huh, and here I bought 85/15 for $1.99 a pound. Fresh ground, not that preground shiat they ship to some stores.
 
2013-05-25 02:35:19 PM

"It takes all kinds of critters to make Farmer Vincent's fritters."


images.starpulse.com

 
2013-05-25 02:36:57 PM

autopsybeverage: Yessir, it's a great time to be vegan.


I've found that vegan dishes tend to be as expensive as meat-inclusive ones and sometimes more so---well, at least in the time it takes to prepare vegan stuff is concerned.
 
2013-05-25 02:42:32 PM
Meat prices are bound to go up.

Unsustainable agriculture is unsustainable.
 
2013-05-25 02:51:55 PM

Mega Steve: I think we're overlooking the obvious solution. There's lots of meat walking around on two legs. Of course, we'd start with the vegans and vegetarians, as I hear herbivore meat tastes better


This has been my experience. Vegetarians and vegans really do seem to taste and smell significantly better than meat-eaters, both in the sense of having a keener sense of smell and in general just not having reeking breath, offensive b.o. and so forth. Again, as an individual's diet is so cultural and as we generally smell more appealing to those with whom we share a complementary immune system, this seems as if it would be difficult to demonstrate beyond anecdotal evidence.
 
2013-05-25 02:57:49 PM

mmagdalene: Mega Steve: I think we're overlooking the obvious solution. There's lots of meat walking around on two legs. Of course, we'd start with the vegans and vegetarians, as I hear herbivore meat tastes better

This has been my experience. Vegetarians and vegans really do seem to taste and smell significantly better than meat-eaters, both in the sense of having a keener sense of smell and in general just not having reeking breath, offensive b.o. and so forth. Again, as an individual's diet is so cultural and as we generally smell more appealing to those with whom we share a complementary immune system, this seems as if it would be difficult to demonstrate beyond anecdotal evidence.


9.5/10

You are good.
 
2013-05-25 03:01:40 PM
Heh, a bunch of people said meat.
 
2013-05-25 03:01:43 PM

mmagdalene: Mega Steve: I think we're overlooking the obvious solution. There's lots of meat walking around on two legs. Of course, we'd start with the vegans and vegetarians, as I hear herbivore meat tastes better

This has been my experience. Vegetarians and vegans really do seem to taste and smell significantly better than meat-eaters, both in the sense of having a keener sense of smell and in general just not having reeking breath, offensive b.o. and so forth. Again, as an individual's diet is so cultural and as we generally smell more appealing to those with whom we share a complementary immune system, this seems as if it would be difficult to demonstrate beyond anecdotal evidence.


I have the weirdest veggie-boner right now...
 
2013-05-25 03:06:29 PM
Beta Tested:
You are good.

MelGoesOnTour:
I have the weirdest veggie-boner right now...

Well, I am delicious.
 
2013-05-25 03:13:57 PM
Let me see if I understand

Last year consumers demanded pink slime be taken out of ground meat
pink slime made up about 7% of ground meat
the price of ground meat went up 7%

Idonthaveaproblemwiththis.jpg
 
ows
2013-05-25 03:33:39 PM
i'm happy to announce my meat is still free.
 
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