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(Mental Floss)   "Grief Bacon", plus 37 other words we really ought to have in English   (mentalfloss.com) divider line 50
    More: Amusing, English, bacon, Nutella, sandwich artists  
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4126 clicks; posted to Geek » on 24 May 2013 at 6:07 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-24 06:14:48 PM  
Go be Kummerspeck somewhere else.
 
2013-05-24 06:18:35 PM  
but the eskimos have 125,612,001 words for snow.
 
2013-05-24 06:24:22 PM  
How is "koi no yokan" a convenient foreign word? It's a phrase, first of all, and it translates into basically what the description is...
 
2013-05-24 06:24:38 PM  
10. Faamiti (Samoan)
To make a squeaking sound by sucking air past the lips in order to gain the attention of a dog or child.

you mean whistling.  too bad there's no english word for that.  oh, wait.
 
2013-05-24 06:27:03 PM  
Well now I know what schlemiel and shlimazel means.
 
2013-05-24 06:31:27 PM  
Both grief and bacon are in English.  "Grief Bacon" is a phrase.

/englishdouche
 
2013-05-24 06:31:44 PM  
The author has a  backpfeifengesicht
 
2013-05-24 06:32:53 PM  
We HAVE a word for 'Backpfeifengesicht' in English. It's 'Hannity'.
 
2013-05-24 06:51:45 PM  
In before someone going ballistic due to bacon's popularity.
 
2013-05-24 07:04:15 PM  

pute kisses like a man: 10. Faamiti (Samoan)
To make a squeaking sound by sucking air past the lips in order to gain the attention of a dog or child.

you mean whistling.  too bad there's no english word for that.  oh, wait.


I thought that too but I think they are referring to the more "tsk tsk tsk" you make when trying to get a dog's (or child's) attention.
 
2013-05-24 07:21:24 PM  

js34603: pute kisses like a man: 10. Faamiti (Samoan)
To make a squeaking sound by sucking air past the lips in order to gain the attention of a dog or child.

you mean whistling.  too bad there's no english word for that.  oh, wait.

I thought that too but I think they are referring to the more "tsk tsk tsk" you make when trying to get a dog's (or child's) attention.


I don't suck air in when I "tsk tsk tsk".  Am I doin' it wrong?
 
2013-05-24 07:33:42 PM  

lesliessexxy: js34603: pute kisses like a man: 10. Faamiti (Samoan)
To make a squeaking sound by sucking air past the lips in order to gain the attention of a dog or child.

you mean whistling.  too bad there's no english word for that.  oh, wait.

I thought that too but I think they are referring to the more "tsk tsk tsk" you make when trying to get a dog's (or child's) attention.

I don't suck air in when I "tsk tsk tsk".  Am I doin' it wrong?


I don't know about wrong, but you should definitely suck more.
 
2013-05-24 07:49:19 PM  
5. Backpfeifengesicht (German)
A face badly in need of a fist.
 
We do have a word for that, it's Bieber.
 
2013-05-24 07:51:07 PM  

lesliessexxy: js34603: pute kisses like a man: 10. Faamiti (Samoan)
To make a squeaking sound by sucking air past the lips in order to gain the attention of a dog or child.

you mean whistling.  too bad there's no english word for that.  oh, wait.

I thought that too but I think they are referring to the more "tsk tsk tsk" you make when trying to get a dog's (or child's) attention.

I don't suck air in when I "tsk tsk tsk".  Am I doin' it wrong?


Not "tsk tsk tsk". It's that smooch smooch kissy sound done with the lips.
 
2013-05-24 08:01:20 PM  

pute kisses like a man: 10. Faamiti (Samoan)
To make a squeaking sound by sucking air past the lips in order to gain the attention of a dog or child.

you mean whistling.  too bad there's no english word for that.  oh, wait.


Last I checked, whistling doesn't squeak.
 
2013-05-24 08:13:41 PM  
Here's a question:

Is there a word that describes the feeling you get when it's a different day of the week than the actual one? Like, when you wake up on a Tuesday but it feels more like a Thursday? I get that all the time and I wonder if the Germans or Japanese have something succinct that means just that feeling.
 
2013-05-24 08:33:50 PM  
RedVentrue:

Not "tsk tsk tsk". It's that smooch smooch kissy sound done with the lips.

I sat here for 2 minutes doing that and got strange looks from my coworkers.
 
2013-05-24 08:36:50 PM  
17 accoutrements
19 butter-face
 
2013-05-24 08:37:34 PM  
No, we already have "bacon".

/let's not go down the 'eskimos and number of words for snow' route, ffs
 
2013-05-24 08:46:36 PM  
www.cvcomics.com

Agrees.
 
2013-05-24 09:01:03 PM  

starlost: but the eskimos have 125,612,001 words for snow.


Did you know the human body is 98% water and the human body needs 4 gallons or water a day?
 
2013-05-24 09:27:29 PM  

lesliessexxy: RedVentrue:

Not "tsk tsk tsk". It's that smooch smooch kissy sound done with the lips.

I sat here for 2 minutes doing that and got strange looks from my coworkers.


Daycare workers are prudes like that.
 
2013-05-24 09:33:44 PM  

pute kisses like a man: 10. Faamiti (Samoan)
To make a squeaking sound by sucking air past the lips in order to gain the attention of a dog or child.

you mean whistling.  too bad there's no english word for that.  oh, wait.


No, it's the kissy noise
 
2013-05-24 09:46:06 PM  

Ishkur: Here's a question:

Is there a word that describes the feeling you get when it's a different day of the week than the actual one? Like, when you wake up on a Tuesday but it feels more like a Thursday? I get that all the time and I wonder if the Germans or Japanese have something succinct that means just that feeling.


That's Pilgrimstag. The weird sensation of coming unstuck in time while being firebombed in Dresden.
 
2013-05-24 09:46:37 PM  

Ishkur: Here's a question:

Is there a word that describes the feeling you get when it's a different day of the week than the actual one? Like, when you wake up on a Tuesday but it feels more like a Thursday? I get that all the time and I wonder if the Germans or Japanese have something succinct that means just that feeling.



I don't know, but you could probably just string together the German words for day-of-the-week and confusion and you'd have a perfectly serviceable word.
 
2013-05-24 10:04:30 PM  

Ishkur: Here's a question:

Is there a word that describes the feeling you get when it's a different day of the week than the actual one? Like, when you wake up on a Tuesday but it feels more like a Thursday? I get that all the time and I wonder if the Germans or Japanese have something succinct that means just that feeling.


The great thing about German is that, if there is not a word for it, there already is a word for it!

In your case, I would call it "Tagdoofenheit".
 
2013-05-24 11:11:01 PM  
ah ha.. now i know what comes before Hofenstep Incorporated, we're gonna do it.
 
2013-05-24 11:29:10 PM  

LikeALeafOnTheWind: ah ha.. now i know what comes before Hofenstep

Hasenpfeffer  Incorporated, we're gonna do it.

FTFY
 
2013-05-24 11:35:05 PM  
Silly_Sot
Ishkur:
Here's a question:

Is there a word that describes the feeling you get when it's a different day of the week than the actual one? Like, when you wake up on a Tuesday but it feels more like a Thursday? I get that all the time and I wonder if the Germans or Japanese have something succinct that means just that feeling.

The great thing about German is that, if there is not a word for it, there already is a word for it!

In your case, I would call it "Tagdoofenheit".


Phantomwochentagsempfinden

Wochentagsunwirklichkeitsgefühl
 
2013-05-24 11:37:23 PM  

Dicky B: LikeALeafOnTheWind: ah ha.. now i know what comes before Hofenstep Hasenpfeffer  Incorporated, we're gonna do it.

FTFY


WABBIT SEASON!!
 
2013-05-24 11:42:44 PM  
Btw, those could be translated as:

"phantom weekday sensation"

and

"weekday [unreality | insubstantiality ] feeling"
 
2013-05-24 11:45:57 PM  

The Voice of Doom: Silly_Sot
Ishkur: Here's a question:

Is there a word that describes the feeling you get when it's a different day of the week than the actual one? Like, when you wake up on a Tuesday but it feels more like a Thursday? I get that all the time and I wonder if the Germans or Japanese have something succinct that means just that feeling.

The great thing about German is that, if there is not a word for it, there already is a word for it!

In your case, I would call it "Tagdoofenheit".

Phantomwochentagsempfinden

Wochentagsunwirklichkeitsgefühl


I would have gone with the simpler: Tagverwirrung
 
2013-05-25 12:26:15 AM  
"2. Shemojamo (Georgian)"

Is my favorite by far.
 
2013-05-25 12:27:20 AM  
17. Pålegg (Norweigian)
Sandwich Artists unite! The Norwegians have a non-specific descriptor for anything - ham, cheese, jam, Nutella, mustard, herring, pickles, Doritos, you name it - you might consider putting into a sandwich.

Read the full text here: http://mentalfloss.com/article/50698/38-wonderful-foreign-words-we-co u ld-use-english#ixzz2UH79C9Pv
--brought to you by mental_floss!

Sammich fixings?

Ha! English has a word for it, too! Fixings.

Get the fixins out of the fridge. I'm gonna make me a Dagwood.

We also have a word for everything that accompanies a roast turkey: trimmings.

Ma made a turkey dinner with all the trimmings.

I'm sure a language as big and flexible as English must have as many weird and wonderful words as any other or perhaps several languages combined. We're just used to our odd little linguistic ways.
 
2013-05-25 12:47:24 AM  
20. Seigneur-terraces (French)
Coffee shop dwellers who sit at tables a long time but spend little money.

We have a few words for these as well.

Hipsters. Apple fanboys. And so forth. I'm sure that somebody who as worked as a Starbucks barista can think of something even more specific.

Reminds me of the old Thurber cartoon about the drunken house-guest who just won't go:

We call her Melody, because she lingers on.

You could call them willnots because they willnot leave, or Lingeries (pronunciation the same same as the comic pseudo-hick pronunciation used for the article of clothing-- linger-ees.

19. Bakku-shan (Japanese)
Or there's this Japanese slang term, which describes the experience of seeing a woman who appears pretty from behind but not from the front.
 I know this experience well. And it isn't just young women or shapely people with fugly faces--you can be following a jogger who looks young and athletic and then you see their face--they are older than Amenhotep. I suggest that we call these people DeeGees. From The Portrait of Dorian Grey, of course. Or we could call them Three Card Montes. Because when the card is flipped over it is always a tremendous disappointment and loss for us.


What a DeeGee she turned out to be!  That sounds right.

He turned around and yikes! DeeGee.

We could also use DeeGee for people who look great but you rapidly realize they are horrible, horrible people when you talk with them for a few minutes or have to describe them to somebody who doesn't know them.
 
2013-05-25 12:47:24 AM  
ecx.images-amazon.com
 
2013-05-25 01:20:25 AM  
brantgoose:
19. Bakku-shan (Japanese)
Or there's this Japanese slang term, which describes the experience of seeing a woman who appears pretty from behind but not from the front.


While not universally applicable, "Butterface" usually fits.
 
2013-05-25 02:02:21 AM  

starlost: but the eskimos have 125,612,001 words for snow.


gameshowhost: No, we already have "bacon".

/let's not go down the 'eskimos and number of words for snow' route, ffs


Well, shiat. I should read the second comment sometimes.
 
2013-05-25 02:10:12 AM  
4. Mamihlapinatapai (Yaghan language of Tierra del Fuego)
This word captures that special look shared between two people, when both are wishing that the other would do something that they both want, but neither want to do.

That's called playing chicken.

9. Mencolek (Indonesian)
You know that old trick where you tap someone lightly on the opposite shoulder from behind to fool them? The Indonesians have a word for it.

That's just the word "pinch" translated into bahasa Indonesia.

28. Boketto (Japanese)
It's nice to know that the Japanese think enough of the act of gazing vacantly into the distance without thinking to give it a name.

Known in English as the Thousand Yard Stare.

31. Packesel (German)
The packesel is the person who's stuck carrying everyone else's bags on a trip. Literally, a burro.

I won't even dignify this one.  The ass that wrote TFA had to go out of his way to translate mule into German and then into Spanish just to claim we don't have a word for mule.  And in English the word carries the extra connotation of "one who has been paid or forced to carry narcotics on or inside their person in order to bypass international customs".
 
2013-05-25 02:14:58 AM  
You farkers' translation for these words are farking terrible.
 
2013-05-25 02:19:51 AM  

Arachnophobe: We HAVE a word for 'Backpfeifengesicht' in English. It's 'Hannity

 'Chris Mathews'.

FTFY.

And this:29. L'esprit de l'escalier (French)
Literally, stairwell wit-a too-late retort thought of only after departure.

is called a 'Costanza' as in 'jerk store'.
 
2013-05-25 03:17:25 AM  
brantgoose:
I'm sure a language as big and flexible as English must have as many weird and wonderful words as any other or perhaps several languages combined. We're just used to our odd little linguistic ways.

My wife isn't a native English speaker and every now and then (sadly less often as time passes) I'll say a phrase she's never heard, and I have to stop and explain it.  Last one I can remember is "stick in the mud" which she found very amusing.
 
2013-05-25 06:21:27 AM  

HotWingAgenda: 28. Boketto (Japanese)
It's nice to know that the Japanese think enough of the act of gazing vacantly into the distance without thinking to give it a name.

Known in English as the Thousand Yard Stare.


Nope.  Thousand Yard Stare is caused by trauma.  Boke is more like "zoning out".  Calling someone "boke" is like calling them an airhead or a space cadet.

ボケッとする (boke-tto suru) is from "bokeru" (呆ける/惚ける) which means play dumb or go senile.  Although it could come from "bokeru" (暈ける) which means got out of focus or fade.  It's now only applied to things not people, but I suppose it could have been applied to stupid people in the past.

/Yes writing the same word with a different character changes the meaning
//That's why I like written Japanese better than written English
///And why Japanese humour is so full of puns and double entendre
 
2013-05-25 08:45:22 AM  
20. Seigneur-terraces (French)
Coffee shop dwellers who sit at tables a long time but spend little money.

Where the fark did they get that one? Except from the original list of supposed "words english doesn't have" that's been going around the Internet since even before Al Gore uploaded his first pic of titties.
34 years in France, been in a lot of cafés and bars, worked in some, never heard that one.
 
2013-05-25 11:23:14 AM  
Kummerspeck doesn't translate to "grief bacon." For certain translations of "speck" it might be claimed that it does but it translates to "grief fat." Or the weight you pack on by eating your sorrow away.
 
2013-05-25 12:21:43 PM  
I always liked the Latin word "verberabilissimus" which means "most worthy of being beaten with rods." This thread makes me think of that for more than one reason.
 
2013-05-25 01:42:58 PM  

brantgoose: 19. Bakku-shan (Japanese)
Or there's this Japanese slang term, which describes the experience of seeing a woman who appears pretty from behind but not from the front.
I know this experience well. And it isn't just young women or shapely people with fugly faces--you can be following a jogger who looks young and athletic and then you see their face--they are older than Amenhotep. I suggest that we call these people DeeGees. From The Portrait of Dorian Grey, of course. Or we could call them Three Card Montes. Because when the card is flipped over it is always a tremendous disappointment and loss for us.


Didn't butterface have this covered a long time ago?
 
2013-05-25 03:12:50 PM  

Whatthefark: 5. Backpfeifengesicht (German)
A face badly in need of a fist.
 
We do have a word for that, it's Bieber.


That's not English, that's Canadian.
 
2013-05-25 05:54:26 PM  

Ishkur: Here's a question:

Is there a word that describes the feeling you get when it's a different day of the week than the actual one? Like, when you wake up on a Tuesday but it feels more like a Thursday? I get that all the time and I wonder if the Germans or Japanese have something succinct that means just that feeling.


"I know we've only known each other four weeks and three days, but to me it seems like nine weeks and five days. The first day seemed like a week and the second day seemed like five days. And the third day seemed like a week again and the fourth day seemed like eight days. And the fifth day you went to see your mother and that seemed just like a day, and then you came back and later on the sixth day, in the evening, when we saw each other, that started seeming like two days, so in the evening it seemed like two days spilling over into the next day and that started seeming like four days, so at the end of the sixth day on into the seventh day, it seemed like a total of five days. And the sixth day seemed like a week and a half. I have it written down, but I can show it to you tomorrow if you want to see it."

/I know it's not very succinct, but it's all I got...
 
2013-05-25 06:56:27 PM  
shemomedjamo

25.media.tumblr.com
 
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