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(CNBC)   Germany voted most popular country in the world. Well, not in Poland or France...but still   (cnbc.com) divider line 137
    More: Amusing, German government  
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2890 clicks; posted to Main » on 24 May 2013 at 10:40 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



137 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-05-24 10:09:40 AM
Or Denmark, or Norway, or Russia, or Greece, or Hungary, or Belgium, or Luxembourg, or the former Yugoslavic states, or Malta, or the Netherlands....but still.
 
2013-05-24 10:43:43 AM
But it's still cool with the US, right? Right?
 
2013-05-24 10:43:52 AM
I admire Germany and wish I were German.
 
2013-05-24 10:45:29 AM
They say that the Germans always make good stuff, but that's because they have never seen German pornography.
 
2013-05-24 10:46:49 AM
how about israel?  did they vote for the jurmans??
 
2013-05-24 10:46:57 AM
At least until WWIII. Kidding!
 
2013-05-24 10:48:17 AM

Suede head: I admire Germany and wish I were German.


Well start eating tons of bland food (limited to only white asparagas when it is in season), go to Majorca every single vacation, and start sporting some Jack Wolfskin and you will be halfway there.
 
2013-05-24 10:49:02 AM
Upper Volta was voted "class clown"but wasn't around to claim her prize.

Transylvania was vote "most spirited" but the Irish are demanding a recount.

South Carolina was voted most likely to secede.
 
2013-05-24 10:49:04 AM

Suede head: I admire Germany and wish I were German.


Don't give up hope.  Third time's a charm.
 
2013-05-24 10:49:10 AM
I've always wonderd what attitudes towards France were like in the 19th century. After successive wars started by France througout that entire century, I kind of wonder if people said the same thing about them and continued to blame them even after all the people who started the conflicts were long dead. Smitty, WW2 ended 70 years ago. It's a different country, different people, different attitudes. Don't you get a little tired of reading how you must be directly responsible for slavery? Give it a rest already.
 
2013-05-24 10:49:32 AM
Somebody's always gonna suck up to the rich kid, just like people do with the U.S. I think it's hilarious that Germany finally conquered Europe with diplomacy. Could've saved so much time and pain, guys.
 
2013-05-24 10:51:26 AM

Suede head: I admire Germany and wish I were German.


I can actually claim German citizenship. (And Lithuanian. And possibly Polish.)
 
2013-05-24 10:52:23 AM
i concur

i was stationed at ramstein 98 - 02, then went back for 3 months (rhein-main) in 04.

germany was my #1 choice (as well as 2 other choices...ramstein #1, rhein-main and spangdhalem also on the list) on my "dream sheet" coming out of basic/tech school, but when my classmates, who got to the assignment lists before i did due to my being the class leader and having to command the marching, came up to me saying "you're going to germany!", i thought they were messing with me. NO ONE gets their #1 choice! but to my surprise, off to germany i went!

funny thing is, aside from having to learn some of the language to really enjoy the experience, i did NOT have culture shock going over there...but going back home to hope, arkansas, on leave, i had MAJOR culture shock and could not wait to get back "home" to germany!

and now i can't wait for the day i have enough money saved up to take the family on a german vacation
 
2013-05-24 10:52:24 AM

Lyonid: Suede head: I admire Germany and wish I were German.

Don't give up hope.  Third time's a charm.


I see what you did there.
 
2013-05-24 10:53:45 AM

thisiszombocom: how about israel?  did they vote for the jurmans??


Isreal beats out north korean...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-22624104
 
2013-05-24 10:55:09 AM
Popular != good.

You know who else was popular?
 
2013-05-24 10:57:21 AM

bungle_jr: funny thing is, aside from having to learn some of the language to really enjoy the experience, i did NOT have culture shock going over there...but going back home to hope, arkansas, on leave, i had MAJOR culture shock and could not wait to get back "home" to germany!


Try living up north far away from the Americans - It'll come.

/also had reverse culture shock
//had i moved somewhere other than Brooklyn where I actually had to drive, it probably would have been worse.
 
2013-05-24 10:57:54 AM

bungle_jr: i concur

i was stationed at ramstein 98 - 02, then went back for 3 months (rhein-main) in 04.

germany was my #1 choice (as well as 2 other choices...ramstein #1, rhein-main and spangdhalem also on the list) on my "dream sheet" coming out of basic/tech school, but when my classmates, who got to the assignment lists before i did due to my being the class leader and having to command the marching, came up to me saying "you're going to germany!", i thought they were messing with me. NO ONE gets their #1 choice! but to my surprise, off to germany i went!

funny thing is, aside from having to learn some of the language to really enjoy the experience, i did NOT have culture shock going over there...but going back home to hope, arkansas, on leave, i had MAJOR culture shock and could not wait to get back "home" to germany!

and now i can't wait for the day i have enough money saved up to take the family on a german vacation


When I went to Naples for a chem/bio response exercise, the woman at the on-base Subway (which is horrid - never eat on-base at Capodichino) said she had been deployed there for three years and didn't speak a word of Italian. She almost never left base. I can't imagine being deployed to a foreign country for three years and not trying to learn the language and spending time experiencing life elsewhere.
 
2013-05-24 10:58:28 AM

Rapmaster2000: They say that the Germans always make good stuff, but that's because they have never seen German pornography.


I find it efficient.
 
2013-05-24 10:59:08 AM

miss diminutive: Or Denmark, or Norway, or Russia, or Greece, or Hungary, or Belgium, or Luxembourg, or the former Yugoslavic states, or Malta, or the Netherlands....but still.


Let's sing along!

The Germans invaded the French,The Germans invaded the CzechsThe Germans invaded the Netherlands,And they invaded North Africa nextThe Germans invaded the Balkans,And they almost invaded in Spain,Along with the Soviet regions, the Poles and Norwegians, The Belgians, the Brits and the Danes!
 
2013-05-24 10:59:22 AM
I am excited that German software company SAP has started hiring autistic people. They found out that when they hired them their productivity goes through the roof. Great news for my daughter, I hope I hope.
 
2013-05-24 10:59:24 AM

lilplatinum: bungle_jr: funny thing is, aside from having to learn some of the language to really enjoy the experience, i did NOT have culture shock going over there...but going back home to hope, arkansas, on leave, i had MAJOR culture shock and could not wait to get back "home" to germany!

Try living up north far away from the Americans - It'll come.

/also had reverse culture shock
//had i moved somewhere other than Brooklyn where I actually had to drive, it probably would have been worse.


Admit it - you guys are secret socialists.
 
2013-05-24 11:01:40 AM

Lyonid: miss diminutive: Or Denmark, or Norway, or Russia, or Greece, or Hungary, or Belgium, or Luxembourg, or the former Yugoslavic states, or Malta, or the Netherlands....but still.

Let's sing along!

The Germans invaded the French,The Germans invaded the CzechsThe Germans invaded the Netherlands,And they invaded North Africa nextThe Germans invaded the Balkans,And they almost invaded in Spain,Along with the Soviet regions, the Poles and Norwegians, The Belgians, the Brits and the Danes!


Bah... no preview = no cookie for me.

The Germans invaded the French,

The Germans invaded the Czechs

The Germans invaded the Netherlands,

And they invaded North Africa next

The Germans invaded the Balkans,

And they almost invaded in Spain,

Along with the Soviet regions, the Poles and Norwegians,

The Belgians, the Brits and the Danes!
 
2013-05-24 11:02:29 AM

lilplatinum: Suede head: I admire Germany and wish I were German.

Well start eating tons of bland food (limited to only white asparagas when it is in season), go to Majorca every single vacation, and start sporting some Jack Wolfskin and you will be halfway there.


I've started growing an unironic mullet if that helps.
 
2013-05-24 11:04:45 AM
25.media.tumblr.com
 
2013-05-24 11:05:09 AM

lilplatinum: bungle_jr: funny thing is, aside from having to learn some of the language to really enjoy the experience, i did NOT have culture shock going over there...but going back home to hope, arkansas, on leave, i had MAJOR culture shock and could not wait to get back "home" to germany!

Try living up north far away from the Americans - It'll come.

/also had reverse culture shock
//had i moved somewhere other than Brooklyn where I actually had to drive, it probably would have been worse.


the worst part of living around kaiserslautern was all the americans

but, because of the huge k-town american population, i didn't have to learn the whole language to get by...however, because of the huge k-town american population, i was not motivated enough to learn the whole language.

good and bad on that part. it was easy to communicate most places. but i really should have learned the language anyway. i did try...i can read certain fairly simple things (menu/food labels, simple instructions, etc) in german. and the news that would come on the top of every hour on the radio stations, i could pick up on key points since they spoke clearly and simply, and newsreaders reading headlines often do in any language.

i was always really pissed off at the americans who EXPECTED the locals to speak english, and they had not interest in picking up on any german words/phrases...even had a dumbarse friend who got mad at the lack of english speaking in certain places.

one time i was ordering at mcdonalds (yes, i know...but since i lived there, eating some american fast food wasn't a big deal...and it tasted a little different than stateside mcd) in german...the guy spoke back to me in english. i said "i'm trying to practice my german"...he said "i'm trying to practice my english". touche!
 
2013-05-24 11:05:19 AM

Suede head: lilplatinum: Suede head: I admire Germany and wish I were German.

Well start eating tons of bland food (limited to only white asparagas when it is in season), go to Majorca every single vacation, and start sporting some Jack Wolfskin and you will be halfway there.

I've started growing an unironic mullet if that helps.


Well done, now go uncomfortably stare at some strangers.
 
2013-05-24 11:07:08 AM

lousyskater: [25.media.tumblr.com image 850x817]


Funny, like German humor.
 
2013-05-24 11:07:31 AM

bungle_jr: the worst part of living around kaiserslautern was all the americans

but, because of the huge k-town american population, i didn't have to learn the whole language to get by...however, because of the huge k-town american population, i was not motivated enough to learn the whole language.


Even without Americans, you can pretty much get around in normal cities with English.  I was in Hamburg for 5 years, but at first I thought I was only there a year.  I made minimal effort to learn the language and got around just fine with English (except, amusingly, in the immigration office where they refuse to speak it to you).  I did eventually learn, but that was mostly because I was dating a German and she would switch to German when we argued so that she could win.
 
2013-05-24 11:08:13 AM

AverageAmericanGuy: Popular != good.

You know who else was popular?


One Direction.
 
2013-05-24 11:09:47 AM
vygramul: When I went to Naples for a chem/bio response exercise, the woman at the on-base Subway (which is horrid - never eat on-base at Capodichino) said she had been deployed there for three years and didn't speak a word of Italian. She almost never left base. I can't imagine being deployed to a foreign country for three years and not trying to learn the language and spending time experiencing life elsewhere.

I spent most of my time growing up in Hawaii (USMC dependent).  We'd always lived off base and participated in the non-military community.  SO many of my peers were the opposite: wouldn't leave base except to go to the mall.

Boggled my mind.  Spend years living in a place where people will spend thousands for a few days, and you're not even going to go to the beach?  Hike some waterfalls?  WTF?
 
2013-05-24 11:10:24 AM
They shut off their nuclear plants after fukushima and make great cars (although Tesla is giving them a run for their money in the "best cars" category).  They also make great synthesizers (Waldorf). 

Germany has come a long way and every country should admire their ability to be self-reflective and make changes for the better. 

U.S.A. is acting like 1990s Wal-Mart.  "we're the best, so we're gonna milk this "best" status for as long as we can keep these suckers buying into thinking that the idea of "made in the usa" still exists when it doesn't"
 
2013-05-24 11:11:02 AM

I_C_Weener: AverageAmericanGuy: Popular != good.

You know who else was popular?

One Direction.



3.bp.blogspot.com
Oooh. Sorry. We were going for "Who is Hitler?"

"Who is Hitler?.." You still have control, please make a selection.

 
2013-05-24 11:11:12 AM

vygramul: bungle_jr: i concur

i was stationed at ramstein 98 - 02, then went back for 3 months (rhein-main) in 04.

germany was my #1 choice (as well as 2 other choices...ramstein #1, rhein-main and spangdhalem also on the list) on my "dream sheet" coming out of basic/tech school, but when my classmates, who got to the assignment lists before i did due to my being the class leader and having to command the marching, came up to me saying "you're going to germany!", i thought they were messing with me. NO ONE gets their #1 choice! but to my surprise, off to germany i went!

funny thing is, aside from having to learn some of the language to really enjoy the experience, i did NOT have culture shock going over there...but going back home to hope, arkansas, on leave, i had MAJOR culture shock and could not wait to get back "home" to germany!

and now i can't wait for the day i have enough money saved up to take the family on a german vacation

When I went to Naples for a chem/bio response exercise, the woman at the on-base Subway (which is horrid - never eat on-base at Capodichino) said she had been deployed there for three years and didn't speak a word of Italian. She almost never left base. I can't imagine being deployed to a foreign country for three years and not trying to learn the language and spending time experiencing life elsewhere.


uuugggghhhh, one of THOSE people! i assume she was the spouse of a military man? she should've just stayed with her folks for the 2 to 4 years her husband was overseas.

i had a coworker and his wife who were sort of this way. very nice outgoing folks, would always be at the gatherings we had, very social, etc, but they rarely experienced german culture.

they did have 1 german restaurant they frequented, but it was the laughing stock of german restaurants. neither the germans nor the americans we worked with went to this particular restaurant. going there and saying you like german food was like going to el chico and saying you like mexican food.
 
2013-05-24 11:12:16 AM

Fark U: They shut off their nuclear plants after fukushima and make great cars (although Tesla is giving them a run for their money in the "best cars" category).  They also make great synthesizers (Waldorf).
Germany has come a long way and every country should admire their ability to be self-reflective and make changes for the better.
U.S.A. is acting like 1990s Wal-Mart.  "we're the best, so we're gonna milk this "best" status for as long as we can keep these suckers buying into thinking that the idea of "made in the usa" still exists when it doesn't"


I can't admire their shutting down their nuclear reactors so long as they keep buying power from French nuclear reactors.
 
2013-05-24 11:13:24 AM

bungle_jr: they did have 1 german restaurant they frequented, but it was the laughing stock of german restaurants. neither the germans nor the americans we worked with went to this particular restaurant. going there and saying you like german food was like going to el chico and saying you like mexican food.


Speaking of which, did you ever try Mexican food in germany?   I once ordered a plate of fajitas which included steamed broccoli. 

I later discerned that the word Mexicanische before a food simply meant they had dumped some canned corn on an entre.
 
2013-05-24 11:16:27 AM
vygramul:

I can't admire their shutting down their nuclear reactors so long as they keep buying power from French nuclear reactors.

Yeah, you won't be so arrogant in a few more years.  Mr. "short term thinker"
 
2013-05-24 11:16:31 AM

bungle_jr: uuugggghhhh, one of THOSE people! i assume she was the spouse of a military man? she should've just stayed with her folks for the 2 to 4 years her husband was overseas.

i had a coworker and his wife who were sort of this way. very nice outgoing folks, would always be at the gatherings we had, very social, etc, but they rarely experienced german culture.

they did have 1 german restaurant they frequented, but it was the laughing stock of german restaurants. neither the germans nor the americans we worked with went to this particular restaurant. going there and saying you like german food was like going to el chico and saying you like mexican food.


I didn't converse with her long, but she was a civilian, so probably a spouse.

It's always funny when you see American tourists eating at a KFC or McDonald's. It's like, really? You're not going to try a Pizza Margherita while you're in Naples? Not going to go to the cafe for pastries and gelato? You're going to eat THERE?
 
2013-05-24 11:19:08 AM

lilplatinum: bungle_jr: the worst part of living around kaiserslautern was all the americans

but, because of the huge k-town american population, i didn't have to learn the whole language to get by...however, because of the huge k-town american population, i was not motivated enough to learn the whole language.

Even without Americans, you can pretty much get around in normal cities with English.


some of my funnest memories were the 2 or 3 times where english really didn't get us by.

once, we were camping out in a field for Bizarre Fest (near cologne). one of my buddies and i needed to go drop a deuce, so rather than using the outdoors or walking to the super crowded fest, we wandered about 1/2 mile into this nearby town. we walked into a corner pub this fine early afternoon, to find 3 guys...the bartender, and an older guy and a younger guy who were manning the barstools. the younger guy spoke a little bit of english, the old guy and the bartender spoke essentially none.

so, with our broken german and the younger guy translating the best he could, we learned the older guy was a newly retired cop, the younger guy was a cop on his force treating him to retirement drinks, and my buddy and i got thoroughly plastered thanks to their extreme generosity.

when we stumbled back to our campsite, our slightly worried friends got the full story. we were gone a couple hours, but after we explained they understood happily why it took us so long.

/csb
 
2013-05-24 11:19:20 AM

Fark U: vygramul:

I can't admire their shutting down their nuclear reactors so long as they keep buying power from French nuclear reactors.

Yeah, you won't be so arrogant in a few more years.  Mr. "short term thinker"


The fall-out from a French melt-down is just going to Germany to begin with. I admire their building solar - they even have an entire town run by solar. But handing off the nuclear safety to another country and hoping for the best is not my idea of a good move. So long as I'm in danger of fall-out, I'd rather keep MY hands on making sure the place is safe than someone else.

/Japan has had a horrid safety record, as far as I can tell
 
2013-05-24 11:19:40 AM

Fark U: vygramul:

I can't admire their shutting down their nuclear reactors so long as they keep buying power from French nuclear reactors.

Yeah, you won't be so arrogant in a few more years.  Mr. "short term thinker"


Yes, immediate reactionary political moves are the much better way.   Who cares if there is no realistic substitution for the energy generated by those plants, we will just power the country by Pixie Dust and Unicorn Farts.

/Atomkraft?  Ja, bitte.
 
2013-05-24 11:19:55 AM

Some parts of Germany are quite lovely.


i.imgur.com
i.imgur.com
 
2013-05-24 11:20:04 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_power_in_Germany 


Germany is the world's top  (PV) installer, with a solar PV capacity as of December 2012 of more than 32.3  (GW).  The German new solar PV installations increased by about 7.6 GW in 2012, and solar PV provided 18 TWh (billion ) of electricity in 2011, about 3% of total electricity. Some market analysts expect this could reach 25 percent by 2050. Germany has a goal of producing 35% of electricity from renewable sources by 2020 and 100% by 2050.

Accommodating high percentages of wind and solar
Germany had not installed adequate storage to accommodate high percentages of wind and solar power and in 2012 is exporting peak generation to neighboring countries.
Approximately 9 GW of photovoltaic plants in Germany are being retrofitted to shut down if the frequency increases to 50.2 Hz, indicating an excess of electricity on the grid. The frequency of the grid is available on the Internet, and is unlikely to reach 50.2 Hz during normal operation, but can if Germany is exporting power to countries that suddenly experience a power failure, as happened in 2003 and 2006


/current technology is current, just wait on the next big "breakthrough" smarty pants guy
//moore's law
///dinosaur thinkers go extinct, as they should.
 
2013-05-24 11:21:26 AM

lilplatinum: bungle_jr: they did have 1 german restaurant they frequented, but it was the laughing stock of german restaurants. neither the germans nor the americans we worked with went to this particular restaurant. going there and saying you like german food was like going to el chico and saying you like mexican food.

Speaking of which, did you ever try Mexican food in germany?   I once ordered a plate of fajitas which included steamed broccoli. 

I later discerned that the word Mexicanische before a food simply meant they had dumped some canned corn on an entre.


the 2 mexican restaurants i went to while there were true americanized tex-mex places that were in business solely because of the american population, so no, not really the experience you had
 
2013-05-24 11:22:21 AM
cl.jroo.me
 
2013-05-24 11:23:46 AM
The 9/11 terrorists had a great time in Hamburg.

/we need a Godwin thing for 9/11... or is that a Giuliani?
 
2013-05-24 11:24:21 AM

vygramul: bungle_jr: uuugggghhhh, one of THOSE people! i assume she was the spouse of a military man? she should've just stayed with her folks for the 2 to 4 years her husband was overseas.

i had a coworker and his wife who were sort of this way. very nice outgoing folks, would always be at the gatherings we had, very social, etc, but they rarely experienced german culture.

they did have 1 german restaurant they frequented, but it was the laughing stock of german restaurants. neither the germans nor the americans we worked with went to this particular restaurant. going there and saying you like german food was like going to el chico and saying you like mexican food.

I didn't converse with her long, but she was a civilian, so probably a spouse.

It's always funny when you see American tourists eating at a KFC or McDonald's. It's like, really? You're not going to try a Pizza Margherita while you're in Naples? Not going to go to the cafe for pastries and gelato? You're going to eat THERE?


my 2nd of 2 trips to venice, during a 4+month stay at aviano, was with a friend and a couple other guys i barely knew who happened to get deployed with us. these 2 guys insisted on eating at MC-FRIGGIN-DONALDS on their 1 and only venetian adventure, and then they went to a store and bought a bottle of DISARONO to drink from while walking around town. my friend and i ragged on them the entire time, and wished we hadn't agreed to tag along with them.
 
2013-05-24 11:25:04 AM
They will come around. The Germans have ways of making people change their minds.
 
2013-05-24 11:25:59 AM

Fark U: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_power_in_Germany
Germany is the world's top  (PV) installer, with a solar PV capacity as of December 2012 of more than 32.3  (GW).  The German new solar PV installations increased by about 7.6 GW in 2012, and solar PV provided 18 TWh (billion ) of electricity in 2011, about 3% of total electricity. Some market analysts expect this could reach 25 percent by 2050. Germany has a goal of producing 35% of electricity from renewable sources by 2020 and 100% by 2050.

Accommodating high percentages of wind and solar
Germany had not installed adequate storage to accommodate high percentages of wind and solar power and in 2012 is exporting peak generation to neighboring countries.
Approximately 9 GW of photovoltaic plants in Germany are being retrofitted to shut down if the frequency increases to 50.2 Hz, indicating an excess of electricity on the grid. The frequency of the grid is available on the Internet, and is unlikely to reach 50.2 Hz during normal operation, but can if Germany is exporting power to countries that suddenly experience a power failure, as happened in 2003 and 2006


/current technology is current, just wait on the next big "breakthrough" smarty pants guy
//moore's law
///dinosaur thinkers go extinct, as they should.


Didn't I SAY that I ADMIRED their solar? Stop trying to attack a straw man.

/Moore's law is over-stated
//Don't complain about gas prices - you're buying exploding liquid dinosaurs
 
2013-05-24 11:27:19 AM
"The Germans have always been a comforting people....."
the-big-bang-theory.com
 
2013-05-24 11:32:01 AM

Fark U: Notice how all the "naysayers" of green energy always use fallacy logic to "power" their arguments.

Germany is still going strong, just like Japan did for the year that they had ZERO nuclear plants in operation.... guess they didn't "need" nuclear afterall.


Germany will not shut down it's reactors until 2022.  The current plan in place agrees there will not be sufficient energy generated internally at this time and energy will have to come from France.

Its a fact, and no amount of name calling, and putting quotes on things and randomly capitalizing words while throwing your little temper tantrums changes that reality.

Solar is not going to help in the cloudy perpetually raining North, and the Greens there are farking whining about running power lines through areas of germany for environmental reasons - so not only can you not have nuclear power, but apparently you can't even transmit green energy.

Its a political scam that cashed in on Ze German population's kneejerk opposition to nuclear.
 
2013-05-24 11:32:45 AM
fc06.deviantart.net
 
2013-05-24 11:35:33 AM
encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com

And I say to countries like France and Poland. Let bygones be bygones. Open your hearts and lower your defenses. Let the German people charm you once again with their crushing love and desire to make things better. Und now, a vord from our sponsor Audi VW. Makers of the new Panzerschlaggerblitzenvagon. Own the road and the countryside in a 2013 Panzerschlaggerblitzenvagon.
 
2013-05-24 11:40:45 AM
No one who speaks german could be evil. that's why everyone likes them.
 
2013-05-24 11:45:14 AM
Here is the City I served in back in the 80's

Aschaffenburg, Germany

media.lonelyplanet.com

1.bp.blogspot.com
www.die-fraenkischen-staedte.de

And, the greatest beer I have ever tasted is from Aschaffenburg.

farm8.staticflickr.com
 
2013-05-24 11:45:36 AM
siebsig
 
2013-05-24 11:47:21 AM

bungle_jr: siebsig


shaking proverbial tiny fist at Beerguy!

/siebzig...ftfm
//ein und siebzig, thanks to Beerguy
 
2013-05-24 11:50:56 AM
Apparently no one mentioned the war.
 
2013-05-24 11:51:24 AM
people who have never been to germany are always fascinated when i and another person discover we've both spent time there and strike up a conversation.

the person who hasn't been there will ask "so what's so special about germany? everyone who has been there goes on and on about how great it is"

i say, "well, it's mostly small differences...like, take for instance their grocery stores. essentially the same as in the usa, but instead of a 4 ft section on an aisle containing a couple varieties of ketchup and mustard, there is an entire aisle of nothing but ketchup and mustard varieties."

this causes further confusion, rather than enlightenment.
 
2013-05-24 11:51:46 AM
I will now tell you a German joke. "A sausage maker buys a box of cereal."

southparkstudios.mtvnimages.com
 
2013-05-24 11:53:31 AM

bungle_jr: i say, "well, it's mostly small differences...like, take for instance their grocery stores. essentially the same as in the usa, but instead of a 4 ft section on an aisle containing a couple varieties of ketchup and mustard, there is an entire aisle of nothing but ketchup and mustard varieties."


If only they kept civilized hours and carried other products, they would be awesome.

Every time I came back from Germany to the states I would just go to a grocery store at some late hour on a Sunday and wander around looking at stuff in amazement just because of the novelty of being able to do so.
 
2013-05-24 11:53:42 AM
USA! USA!  USA!  WE'RE #1 AGAIN!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_nuclear_power_accidents_by_coun tr y#United_States

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_reactor_accidents_in_the_United _S tates

The United States General Accountability Office reported more than 150 incidents from 2001 to 2006 alone of nuclear plants not performing within acceptable safety guidelines. In 2006, it said: "Since 2001, the ROP has resulted in more than 4,000 inspection findings concerning nuclear power plant licensees' failure to fully comply with NRC regulations and industry standards for safe plant operation, and NRC has subjected more than 75 percent (79) of the 103 operating plants to increased oversight for varying periods". Seventy-one percent of all recorded major nuclear accidents, including meltdowns, explosions, fires, and loss of coolants, occurred in the United States, and they happened during both normal operations as well as emergency situations such as floods, droughts, and earthquakes.

/done with this discussion, I am well versed on nuclear dangers and everything else I discuss.  I don't have any more time to argue with elementary level internet posting logic.  Maybe you can explain to your children of the future why everything is contaminated and why everyone has to accept cancer as a "way of life" because you were too busy being snarky on websites.
 
2013-05-24 11:56:24 AM

Beerguy: And, the greatest beer I have ever tasted is from Aschaffenburg.



img2u.info

Ayinger Altbairisch Dunkel is currently my favorite.
 
2013-05-24 11:56:41 AM

lilplatinum: bungle_jr: i say, "well, it's mostly small differences...like, take for instance their grocery stores. essentially the same as in the usa, but instead of a 4 ft section on an aisle containing a couple varieties of ketchup and mustard, there is an entire aisle of nothing but ketchup and mustard varieties."

If only they kept civilized hours and carried other products, they would be awesome.

Every time I came back from Germany to the states I would just go to a grocery store at some late hour on a Sunday and wander around looking at stuff in amazement just because of the novelty of being able to do so.


Nothing like 24-hour grocery stores. Surprisingly few in Northern Virginia, but in Charlottesville, they're easy to find.
 
2013-05-24 11:56:56 AM

lilplatinum: bungle_jr: i say, "well, it's mostly small differences...like, take for instance their grocery stores. essentially the same as in the usa, but instead of a 4 ft section on an aisle containing a couple varieties of ketchup and mustard, there is an entire aisle of nothing but ketchup and mustard varieties."

If only they kept civilized hours and carried other products, they would be awesome.

Every time I came back from Germany to the states I would just go to a grocery store at some late hour on a Sunday and wander around looking at stuff in amazement just because of the novelty of being able to do so.


truth...but i know change has been happening. when i left germany in 2002, almost no businesses accepted mc/visa/etc, only cash or the bank card from a specific bank. when i went back in 04, all the major retailers/grocers took credit/debit, and they had longer hours. i can't recall if that included sundays, but definitely included later evenings during the week, and into the afternoons on saturdays.
 
2013-05-24 11:59:29 AM

Hetfield: Beerguy: And, the greatest beer I have ever tasted is from Aschaffenburg.


[img2u.info image 420x632]

Ayinger Altbairisch Dunkel is currently my favorite.


That stuff is just wunderbar.
 
2013-05-24 11:59:43 AM

bungle_jr: truth...but i know change has been happening. when i left germany in 2002, almost no businesses accepted mc/visa/etc, only cash or the bank card from a specific bank. when i went back in 04, all the major retailers/grocers took credit/debit, and they had longer hours. i can't recall if that included sundays, but definitely included later evenings during the week, and into the afternoons on saturdays.


It varies - it's probably better in the South where there are lots of Americans they want to cater to.   Since germans don't generally have revolving credit like we do, credit card acceptance was pretty rare in Hamburg - none of the grocery stores (maybe one of the really big ones outside of town) took CCs and everything everything was mandated closed on Sunday (barring a few special shopping Sundays) - all as of Dec 2011 when I left.

I understand it was worse before I got there, as stores used to close ass early on Saturdays too.  Baby steps.   Maybe one day you will be allowed to mow your yard on a Sunday.
 
2013-05-24 12:00:30 PM

Hetfield: Beerguy: And, the greatest beer I have ever tasted is from Aschaffenburg.


[img2u.info image 420x632]

Ayinger Altbairisch Dunkel is currently my favorite.


Ooooohh....

I didn't know they make a Dunkel.

I now know my quest.
 
2013-05-24 12:01:01 PM
Also awesome was neither Saturn nor Ikea, the equivilant of Best Buy, didn't take farking credit cards.  That made it fun to furnish an apartment before I had a german bank account...   Hold on, let me go to the ATM and see if I can pull like 3 grand out in intervals of 200.
 
2013-05-24 12:01:41 PM

lilplatinum: Also awesome was neither Saturn nor Ikea, the equivilant of Best Buy,


Mixed that up, Saturn is like Best Buy...  Ikea is like cheap disposable crap.
 
2013-05-24 12:06:01 PM

Evil Mackerel: That stuff is just wunderbar.


Hell yes.

Beerguy: I didn't know they make a Dunkel.


It's soooo good. Sooooooooo good.
 
2013-05-24 12:06:56 PM

lilplatinum: bungle_jr: truth...but i know change has been happening. when i left germany in 2002, almost no businesses accepted mc/visa/etc, only cash or the bank card from a specific bank. when i went back in 04, all the major retailers/grocers took credit/debit, and they had longer hours. i can't recall if that included sundays, but definitely included later evenings during the week, and into the afternoons on saturdays.

It varies - it's probably better in the South where there are lots of Americans they want to cater to.   Since germans don't generally have revolving credit like we do, credit card acceptance was pretty rare in Hamburg - none of the grocery stores (maybe one of the really big ones outside of town) took CCs and everything everything was mandated closed on Sunday (barring a few special shopping Sundays) - all as of Dec 2011 when I left.

I understand it was worse before I got there, as stores used to close ass early on Saturdays too.  Baby steps.   Maybe one day you will be allowed to mow your yard on a Sunday.


i was fine with it the "old" way...yes i did have to plan better, being accustomed to america's 24-hour lifestyle, but i have fond memories of going to stores before noon with my dad when i was a kid, because these stores closed at noon on saturdays.

something about the stores closing early and being closed on sundays added to my enjoyment of germany. showed something about their priorities. saturday afternoons and sundays were better spent enjoying things besides shopping.

so saturday evenings, for me, were spent either going to clubs/bars, or "eros" houses
 
2013-05-24 12:08:52 PM

lilplatinum: lilplatinum: Also awesome was neither Saturn nor Ikea, the equivilant of Best Buy,

Mixed that up, Saturn is like Best Buy...  Ikea is like cheap disposable crap.


i was not familiar with saturn...we had Media Markt as a best buy equivilant. i typically just bought cds there, so no biggie on the money thing
 
2013-05-24 12:09:06 PM
Belgian beer is better.
 
2013-05-24 12:12:29 PM

esteban9: Belgian beer is better.


img2u.info

I would like to hold sexual congress with Affligem Dubbel.
 
2013-05-24 12:14:08 PM

bungle_jr: i was not familiar with saturn...we had Media Markt as a best buy equivilant.


Media Markt and Saturn belong to the same company.
 
2013-05-24 12:15:19 PM

bungle_jr: i was fine with it the "old" way...yes i did have to plan better, being accustomed to america's 24-hour lifestyle, but i have fond memories of going to stores before noon with my dad when i was a kid, because these stores closed at noon on saturdays.

something about the stores closing early and being closed on sundays added to my enjoyment of germany. showed something about their priorities. saturday afternoons and sundays were better spent enjoying things besides shopping.


All well and good if you are a traditional family.   If you are a single guy who happens to work during the relatively short weekday hours, it is not fun having to do all of your shopping on a Saturday morning.

Added to the fact that bars didn't close, and all my farking german friends would want to meet up at the bar at midnight meant the likelihood of actuallly waking up in time to do the shopping was pretty low.

I ate a lot of delivery.

There was always a longstanding argument about the pros and cons of Sunday shopping in Germany.  They claimed it is their stand against rampant commercialism.  I tended to take the view that if the irresistible siren call of shopping made it impossible for you to do anything else unless the stores were forcibly closed, the problem is with the consumer rather than the system.
 
2013-05-24 12:16:59 PM

lilplatinum: lilplatinum: Also awesome was neither Saturn nor Ikea, the equivilant of Best Buy,

Mixed that up, Saturn is like Best Buy...  Ikea is like cheap disposable crap.


"like"?
 
2013-05-24 12:18:08 PM

Hetfield: bungle_jr: i was not familiar with saturn...we had Media Markt as a best buy equivilant.

Media Markt and Saturn belong to the same company.


ah ha! did not know that.

lilplatinum: bungle_jr: i was fine with it the "old" way...yes i did have to plan better, being accustomed to america's 24-hour lifestyle, but i have fond memories of going to stores before noon with my dad when i was a kid, because these stores closed at noon on saturdays.

something about the stores closing early and being closed on sundays added to my enjoyment of germany. showed something about their priorities. saturday afternoons and sundays were better spent enjoying things besides shopping.

All well and good if you are a traditional family.   If you are a single guy who happens to work during the relatively short weekday hours, it is not fun having to do all of your shopping on a Saturday morning.

Added to the fact that bars didn't close, and all my farking german friends would want to meet up at the bar at midnight meant the likelihood of actuallly waking up in time to do the shopping was pretty low.

I ate a lot of delivery.

There was always a longstanding argument about the pros and cons of Sunday shopping in Germany.  They claimed it is their stand against rampant commercialism.  I tended to take the view that if the irresistible siren call of shopping made it impossible for you to do anything else unless the stores were forcibly closed, the problem is with the consumer rather than the system.


all good points. like i said, i did have to make constant adjustments. it did help for convenience and basic food items that we had a 24 hour shopette on base.
 
2013-05-24 12:20:18 PM
No fair, It's just a popularity contest.

P.S. Send Euros.
 
2013-05-24 12:20:42 PM
Spent most of my 20's stationed in Germany. I approve of the ranking.
 
2013-05-24 12:22:09 PM

lilplatinum: Suede head: I admire Germany and wish I were German.

Well start eating tons of bland food (limited to only white asparagas when it is in season), go to Majorca every single vacation, and start sporting some Jack Wolfskin and you will be halfway there.


You're also going to want to start studying up on your David Hasselhoff lore
 
2013-05-24 12:48:02 PM
Here's a link to the Beeb, which did the poll:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-22624104

Germany is number one with 59% mostly positive and 15% mostly negative.

Canada and the UK are tied at 55% mostly positive, but Canada has fewer critics than even Germany, at 13%. You know who you are, Farkers!

The UK has 18% mostly negative but that is understandable. The Irish are never going to forgive or forget. Quite a few people are constantly renewed in the vigour of their anglophobia. Mostly they are slighted or disappointed anglophiles, though, so there's no known cure except kicking English and Scottish butt occasionally. Like Australia does in football. Or Canada does in curling, etc.

The UK is next, followed by former leader, Japan, and then France. All of these rank above the EU, which is to stay, have their heads above the water line.

Brazil, the US and Chine form the next block of very large, growing countries that step on a lot of toes.

They have a large number of dislikes as well as likes, and the two are inversely related, so China is pretty much loathed by as many people as like it, while the US maintains a 45 to 34 positive vote, which isn't bad but surely isn't great for a country that is still a super-power and which claims to be the Saviour of the World as frequently as it infuriates the World.

The thing about the UK is that despite leaving behind political and economic minefields for new governments and societies, it stepped out more or less gracefully and maintains many positive memories and links for her former colonies, especially the heavily Anglo-colonized dominions (Canada, Australia, New Zealand, etc.)

The USA doesn't seem to have any interest in departing, gracefully or otherwise. It continues to step on toes (and noses) without much remorse, even when the "liberals" are notionally in power. Obama is not a bit less America First than any other President. Where foreign policy is concerned, it's pretty much meet the new boss, same as the old boss all the way back to Washington. American Realism is not very sentimental. The main theme is what have you done for us lately? with an emphasis on right now and next.

Strong negotiating skills. Needs work on tact and consideration. On the whole though, America seems to follow in Momma's firm but relatively fair footsteps, albeit with higher spirits and more colateral damage.

Looking at the bottom of the list, the lessons seems to be:

* don't be terrorists
* don't secretly support terrorists
* don't give terrorists safe harbour
* Israel still sucks.

Israel, like Russia and India (both above it on the list) don't much care what anybody else thinks. They do what they want and don't ask for forgiveness, let alone permission. They make a lawyer's case for their virtues and their friends and allies ignore their vices, while their enemies ignore their virtues and everybody who is luke-warm is deemed an enemy of God and Man by both sides.

In the middle, South Korea and South Africa have almost exactly balanced numbers of critics and fans.

Marks need improvement. Do not play well with the other children. Some progress is evident but work still needed.
 
2013-05-24 12:50:35 PM
vygramul: Nothing like 24-hour grocery stores. Surprisingly few in Northern Virginia, but in Charlottesville, they're easy to find.

Fist-bump, land-o'-Jefferson Brother.

/Still bothers me that the locals pronounce Rio as "rye-oh," not "ree-oh"
//Been here going on four years
///I'm guessing that you work at an acronym, one that doesn't start with "U."
 
2013-05-24 12:54:48 PM

m053486: vygramul: Nothing like 24-hour grocery stores. Surprisingly few in Northern Virginia, but in Charlottesville, they're easy to find.

Fist-bump, land-o'-Jefferson Brother.

/Still bothers me that the locals pronounce Rio as "rye-oh," not "ree-oh"
//Been here going on four years
///I'm guessing that you work at an acronym, one that doesn't start with "U."


there is a town south of ft worth named rio vista...pronounced "rye-oh vista". considering the spanish-speaking history of this region, it bothers me more than many other southern mispronunciations!
 
2013-05-24 12:58:22 PM

Suede head: I admire Germany and wish I were German.


I admire some Germans, am a direct descendant of Charlemagne (36th great-grandfather) and wish I were Germany.

Well, Western Europe, really.

But heavy lies the head that bears the Crown.
 
2013-05-24 01:03:11 PM
bungle_jr: there is a town south of ft worth named rio vista...pronounced "rye-oh vista". considering the spanish-speaking history of this region, it bothers me more than many other southern mispronunciations!

This area is rife with odd  local pronunciations.  A nearby town is named Staunton.  You'd think you'd pronounce the first syllable to rhyme with "aunt," but noooooooooo, it's flat, like "ant."  Should've just named it "Stanton."
 
2013-05-24 01:10:26 PM

Astorix: I am excited that German software company SAP has started hiring autistic people. They found out that when they hired them their productivity goes through the roof. Great news for my daughter, I hope I hope.


So that's why SAP's software is the most user-unfriendly that I've ever seen?
 
2013-05-24 01:12:12 PM

vygramul: Fark U: They shut off their nuclear plants after fukushima and make great cars (although Tesla is giving them a run for their money in the "best cars" category).  They also make great synthesizers (Waldorf).
Germany has come a long way and every country should admire their ability to be self-reflective and make changes for the better.
U.S.A. is acting like 1990s Wal-Mart.  "we're the best, so we're gonna milk this "best" status for as long as we can keep these suckers buying into thinking that the idea of "made in the usa" still exists when it doesn't"

I can't admire their shutting down their nuclear reactors so long as they keep buying power from French nuclear reactors.


I'm just playing the Devil's Advocate, understand but one word:  Canada.

As far as I know we're the only country exporting electricity (net) to the US, although Mexico might sell some slack time. All this fuss over the pipeline to Alberta's oil sands leaves me of two minds, seeing as the money doesn't stink but the tar sands do; and most of the big opposition to the pipelines comes from people with plans for other pipelines to other bitumen deposits in their back pockets. Will a completely American route to completely American carbon filth be better for the environment, the economy or the political situation? Probably not, but I'll just have to wait and see.

Grande Baleine drowned tribal lands of the Cree on a scale you can't possibly imagine. The electricity that flows into New York State and New England isn't any cleaner, safer or more secure than local dams, tidal plants and windmills would be. The main advantage is that it is in Northern Quebec, where scarcely anybody complains. Well, where scarcely anybody who matters to the Government of Quebec, Canada or the Boston States of America complains.

 Despite what climate change denialists and anti-enviro cultists claim, liberals need electricity, too. The object, to quote gadfly, George Monbioit, is to keep the lights on. Only safely, sustainably, cleanly, and justly.

But the Germans did or are shutting down their nuclear power plants, which ironically are similar to Canada's CANDU plants (being largely the same technology from the same inventors and engineers), and thus safer than many other models. At one time five out of ten of the plants with the best safety and release records were CANDU. CANDU plants can run with less enriched uranium and use heavy water for moderation so there is less to fail. Water leaks out--plant shuts down and over-heating ends.

Did you know you can get drunk drinking heavy water? No hangovers either. But it's rather expensive compared to even premium bottled water.
 
2013-05-24 01:16:36 PM
fc06.deviantart.net

The invention of break-dancing by patriotic German youth. It's the prefect exercise to build your goose-stepping muscles
 
2013-05-24 01:17:20 PM
Hammerzeit. Hee, hee, hee.

Took a mo' for that to sink in.
 
2013-05-24 01:21:59 PM
Don't hurt them, Hammer*!

*Nickname of Charles the Hammer (AKA Charles Martel), founder of the Carolingian dynasty but no relation to the Carolingian Forests of North and South Carolina.

Marteau (Martel) is hammer in French.
 
2013-05-24 01:23:57 PM

m053486: bungle_jr: there is a town south of ft worth named rio vista...pronounced "rye-oh vista". considering the spanish-speaking history of this region, it bothers me more than many other southern mispronunciations!

This area is rife with odd  local pronunciations.  A nearby town is named Staunton.  You'd think you'd pronounce the first syllable to rhyme with "aunt," but noooooooooo, it's flat, like "ant."  Should've just named it "Stanton."


Don't forget Buena (byoona) Vista and Lebanon (lebnin).
 
2013-05-24 01:31:25 PM

m053486: vygramul: Nothing like 24-hour grocery stores. Surprisingly few in Northern Virginia, but in Charlottesville, they're easy to find.

Fist-bump, land-o'-Jefferson Brother.

/Still bothers me that the locals pronounce Rio as "rye-oh," not "ree-oh"
//Been here going on four years
///I'm guessing that you work at an acronym, one that doesn't start with "U."


Heh- no, I actually just graduated from UVA in December (BA-History) - though I walked the Lawn last weekend. I used to work for a TLA, but my housemates work for one nearby, as you surmise. (Totally serendipitous. I decided to come back to UVA at the same time my now housemate was BRACed down here.)

/I concur on ryeoh/reeoh
//Now at Mary Baldwin working on a teacher's license, but have just been given permission to take a few grad courses this Fall, so I might transition to M.ED
///Wahoowa!
 
2013-05-24 01:46:14 PM

indarwinsshadow: I've always wonderd what attitudes towards France were like in the 19th century. After successive wars started by France througout that entire century, I kind of wonder if people said the same thing about them and continued to blame them even after all the people who started the conflicts were long dead. Smitty, WW2 ended 70 years ago. It's a different country, different people, different attitudes. Don't you get a little tired of reading how you must be directly responsible for slavery? Give it a rest already.


This, the 7 years War, The American Revolutionary War(that France got involved in), and the Napoleonic Wars all happened in a similar time frame to the Franco-Prussian War, WWI, and WWII a little over a century later, and people generally dont think of War Mongering Militarism when they think of France today(they are the wine and cheese eating Surrender Monkeys today)
 
2013-05-24 01:47:19 PM

vygramul: Suede head: I admire Germany and wish I were German.

I can actually claim German citizenship. (And Lithuanian. And possibly Polish.)


The French used to have "blood" or patrimony citizenship, which meant that those with French ancestors could claim it. I believe there was a cut-off, so that us French Canadians could not claim citizenship unless the connection with the old country was recent.They have switched to a less racial and more abstract basis of citizenship, like the American model.

I had to fill out a form when I went to study for some months in France, which asked for my grandparents and great-grandparents names, so I assume that at that time (in the late 80s), they were still interested in how many of us tourists and students could claim citizenship once we got into the country.

That's probably where the cutoff lay--great-grandparents.

America has "soil" or "birth" citizenship for the most part, although if you have one American citizen parent, you are grandfathered, so to speak. You can become a citizen even if your parents are not, either by being born in the USA or by joining the armed forces and fighting for your new country--in advance. Over 900,000 Americans have been adopted via the military path to citizenship. You are deemed to have a vital skill or talent if you are willing and able to serve the Republic at your peril.

This tradition is why the Birther nonsense is so stupid (one reason). Obama had an American Mother and even if he had been born abroad or though his father was, he is considered a "natural born American citizen" by good authorities because it only takes ONE natural born citizen to pass on citizenship. John McCain and Mitt Romney also encountered some grief on the campaign trail because McCain was born in Panama (the Canal Zone, while the country was Occupied so American Panama) and Mitt Romney's parents were Mormon missionaries or at least residents in Mexico. Both of them. But they were American citizens, IIRC.

The rules are a bit complicated by residency as well as citizenship requirements, so that Obama could conceivably not be a citizen if his Mother had lived all of her life in Canada or had fallen short of the residency requirement, but she definitely did not and she didn't renounce her citizenship either.

One American President may have been born in Canada:  Chester A. Arthur. The border was ill-defined and his birthplace, a small cabin near the present border, may have been on the Canadian side of the border at the time he was born. It is definitely on the American side now. But both his parents, being good Americans, claimed they were on the right side of the border no doubt. The States of Texas (among others) and Hawaii were annexed by American planters before the Government became involved. Texas was briefly a Republic because the cotton (and tobacco?) planters and others of the ilk didn't like the revolutionary idea of abolishing slave ownership, which was what the armies of Santa Ana were promoting along with Mexican citizenship.

If Hilary Clinton becomes President, she will be the President with the most French Canadian ancestors and probably the first with any except possibly the Bushes, but she might not be the first. Massive two-way migration and re-migration has mixed the genes of North Americans for four hundred years now.

My massive collection of French Canadians, Loyalists, late loyalists, pre-loyalist Nova Scotia planters, border skippers, ex-pats and guest workers, New Americans and Old Settlers, and a lot more back and forth is proof of that. I'll eventually have to upgrade my genealogy subscription to access American and World census and other records, but at the moment the web is my oyster bed and I can pick up pearls of genealogical fact and speculation without paying more for the US Census material back to 1792 or the Registers of birth, baptism, marriage and other data that have been snapped up by corporations for a song.
 
2013-05-24 01:48:34 PM
WE French Canadians, that is. In before the Grammar Nazis get off the first shot! Ha! ha!
 
2013-05-24 01:53:08 PM

brantgoose: vygramul: Suede head: I admire Germany and wish I were German.

I can actually claim German citizenship. (And Lithuanian. And possibly Polish.)

The French used to have "blood" or patrimony citizenship, which meant that those with French ancestors could claim it. I believe there was a cut-off, so that us French Canadians could not claim citizenship unless the connection with the old country was recent.They have switched to a less racial and more abstract basis of citizenship, like the American model.


Germany's used to be any ancestry, but now they added a language and culture requirement. I'd have to brush up to claim it.

Lithuania additionally requires you worked towards their independence, which I did in a documentable manner.

I don't know Poland's requirement. I may or may not qualify. I don't speak Polish at all.
 
2013-05-24 01:57:38 PM

vygramul: Germany's used to be any ancestry, but now they added a language and culture requirement. I'd have to brush up to claim it.


You also would have had to claim it by the age of 23 were you so inclined (unless you fall under some exception).
 
2013-05-24 02:01:13 PM

This text is now purple: lilplatinum: lilplatinum: Also awesome was neither Saturn nor Ikea, the equivilant of Best Buy,

Mixed that up, Saturn is like Best Buy...  Ikea is like cheap disposable crap.

"like"?


That's why Ikea is nicknamed Ikrappa
 
2013-05-24 02:01:28 PM

lilplatinum: vygramul: Germany's used to be any ancestry, but now they added a language and culture requirement. I'd have to brush up to claim it.

You also would have had to claim it by the age of 23 were you so inclined (unless you fall under some exception).


iirc, I fell under an exception, but I'm not likely to try and claim it now that Palin will never be president.
 
2013-05-24 02:20:28 PM

vygramul: lilplatinum: vygramul: Germany's used to be any ancestry, but now they added a language and culture requirement. I'd have to brush up to claim it.

You also would have had to claim it by the age of 23 were you so inclined (unless you fall under some exception).

iirc, I fell under an exception, but I'm not likely to try and claim it now that Palin will never be president.


Yeah I was over there in the dark ages and was looking into how to get a Tscherman passport, but alas they would have made me give up my Blue one, and as embarassing as our country can be it is kind of handy to have a US passport at times... (except when you make too much abroad and our cocksucker government decides to double tax us).
 
2013-05-24 02:25:57 PM
I did nazi this coming
 
2013-05-24 02:35:23 PM

Suede head: I admire Germany and wish I were German.


I don't wish I was German, but I do admire Germany, love the German people, and wish I could go back and live in Germany. I lived there as a child, in a tiny village near Fulda, and I had an idyllic childhood there. I think there was one person I ever met in the country whom I didn't like and that was our landlord. He always complained about the noise I made (I was a little kid!) and wouldn't let me play in his backyard. His wife was lovely and sweet to me, though, as was everyone else I ever met.

Germany should re-think the austerity policy, especially given the fact that the study it was based on has been proven false, but other than that, they're awesome.
 
2013-05-24 02:38:25 PM

vygramul: It's always funny when you see American tourists eating at a KFC or McDonald's. It's like, really? You're not going to try a Pizza Margherita while you're in Naples? Not going to go to the cafe for pastries and gelato? You're going to eat THERE?


I always try to do a quick stop at a Mickey D's when I'm abroad. McDonalds is so ubiquitous but each country serves very different things - I find it a fun and cute way to spot cultural differences on the cheap. In Italy, burgers are served on ciabatta rolls. In Canada, they serve poutine. In Japan, they serve cheese katsu sandwiches and fries you can season yourself. And of course beer is served in England and Germany. Also, England has an awesome curry dipping sauce. Hell, I went to a McDonalds down south and there were some notable menu differences.

Maybe I'm weird but I just find it intriguing.
 
2013-05-24 02:41:11 PM

silvervial: Suede head: I admire Germany and wish I were German.

I don't wish I was German, but I do admire Germany, love the German people, and wish I could go back and live in Germany. I lived there as a child, in a tiny village near Fulda, and I had an idyllic childhood there. I think there was one person I ever met in the country whom I didn't like and that was our landlord. He always complained about the noise I made (I was a little kid!) and wouldn't let me play in his backyard. His wife was lovely and sweet to me, though, as was everyone else I ever met.

Germany should re-think the austerity policy, especially given the fact that the study it was based on has been proven false, but other than that, they're awesome.


only problem i had with my landlord is that when i'd knock on the door to give them my rent money, all the family was in their underwear. i know that's not uncommon, especially on hot days. but they were your typical middle-aged unattractive, overweight germans. only plus was sometimes their daughter was home...she wasn't the best looking, but definitely not ugly...most likely underage at the time, though, so i didn't try anything.
 
2013-05-24 02:41:23 PM

bungle_jr: Hetfield: bungle_jr: i was not familiar with saturn...we had Media Markt as a best buy equivilant.

Media Markt and Saturn belong to the same company.

ah ha! did not know that.

lilplatinum: bungle_jr: i was fine with it the "old" way...yes i did have to plan better, being accustomed to america's 24-hour lifestyle, but i have fond memories of going to stores before noon with my dad when i was a kid, because these stores closed at noon on saturdays.

something about the stores closing early and being closed on sundays added to my enjoyment of germany. showed something about their priorities. saturday afternoons and sundays were better spent enjoying things besides shopping.

All well and good if you are a traditional family.   If you are a single guy who happens to work during the relatively short weekday hours, it is not fun having to do all of your shopping on a Saturday morning.

Added to the fact that bars didn't close, and all my farking german friends would want to meet up at the bar at midnight meant the likelihood of actuallly waking up in time to do the shopping was pretty low.

I ate a lot of delivery.

There was always a longstanding argument about the pros and cons of Sunday shopping in Germany.  They claimed it is their stand against rampant commercialism.  I tended to take the view that if the irresistible siren call of shopping made it impossible for you to do anything else unless the stores were forcibly closed, the problem is with the consumer rather than the system.

all good points. like i said, i did have to make constant adjustments. it did help for convenience and basic food items that we had a 24 hour shopette on base.


The reason that they haven't conformed to having stores open on Saturday afternoons and Sundays is for the employees of those companies. Working as a cashier is still a career in Germany and they do deserve time off.
It used to be that during the week stores would close between 6 and 7 and Thursdays they would stay open a little longer until 8 to appease the working crowd that can't make it to the store. Saturdays they would only be open once a month. Then the laws slowly started changing and now they are open much later.

/my mother was a cashier and is now a manager for an ALDI store.
 
2013-05-24 02:44:05 PM

Lollipop165: vygramul: It's always funny when you see American tourists eating at a KFC or McDonald's. It's like, really? You're not going to try a Pizza Margherita while you're in Naples? Not going to go to the cafe for pastries and gelato? You're going to eat THERE?

I always try to do a quick stop at a Mickey D's when I'm abroad. McDonalds is so ubiquitous but each country serves very different things - I find it a fun and cute way to spot cultural differences on the cheap. In Italy, burgers are served on ciabatta rolls. In Canada, they serve poutine. In Japan, they serve cheese katsu sandwiches and fries you can season yourself. And of course beer is served in England and Germany. Also, England has an awesome curry dipping sauce. Hell, I went to a McDonalds down south and there were some notable menu differences.

Maybe I'm weird but I just find it intriguing.


in my nearly 4.5 years in germany, and having gone to mcdonalds far too many times, not once did i ever see anyone actually order beer.
 
2013-05-24 02:47:26 PM

ChemOpsFTW: bungle_jr: Hetfield: bungle_jr: i was not familiar with saturn...we had Media Markt as a best buy equivilant.

Media Markt and Saturn belong to the same company.

ah ha! did not know that.

lilplatinum: bungle_jr: i was fine with it the "old" way...yes i did have to plan better, being accustomed to america's 24-hour lifestyle, but i have fond memories of going to stores before noon with my dad when i was a kid, because these stores closed at noon on saturdays.

something about the stores closing early and being closed on sundays added to my enjoyment of germany. showed something about their priorities. saturday afternoons and sundays were better spent enjoying things besides shopping.

All well and good if you are a traditional family.   If you are a single guy who happens to work during the relatively short weekday hours, it is not fun having to do all of your shopping on a Saturday morning.

Added to the fact that bars didn't close, and all my farking german friends would want to meet up at the bar at midnight meant the likelihood of actuallly waking up in time to do the shopping was pretty low.

I ate a lot of delivery.

There was always a longstanding argument about the pros and cons of Sunday shopping in Germany.  They claimed it is their stand against rampant commercialism.  I tended to take the view that if the irresistible siren call of shopping made it impossible for you to do anything else unless the stores were forcibly closed, the problem is with the consumer rather than the system.

all good points. like i said, i did have to make constant adjustments. it did help for convenience and basic food items that we had a 24 hour shopette on base.

The reason that they haven't conformed to having stores open on Saturday afternoons and Sundays is for the employees of those companies. Working as a cashier is still a career in Germany and they do deserve time off.
It used to be that during the week stores would close between 6 and 7 and Thursdays they would stay o ...


and cashiers get to sit down! all my years at walmart and other retail stores, if i was at a cashier stand, i thought "why must i STAND here in one spot for hours, causing foot, leg, and back pain...why would it be considered lazy to sit?"

then i got to germany and was pleasantly surprised to see cashiers SEATED! and of course aldi here in the usa provides cashiers with seats
 
2013-05-24 02:51:25 PM

Onkel Buck: Spent most of my 20's stationed in Germany. I approve of the ranking.


It's interesting that anyone who ever spent any time in Germany, and actually experienced Germany and not just the base they were stationed at, love the fark out of the place. You can't even say that about France or Italy, but Germany, Ja!
 
2013-05-24 02:53:07 PM

ChemOpsFTW: The reason that they haven't conformed to having stores open on Saturday afternoons and Sundays is for the employees of those companies. Working as a cashier is still a career in Germany and they do deserve time off


This doesn't make any sense, plenty of other businesses are open on Saturdays and Sundays - those employees still get time off, just not the weekends off.

This argument about protecting cashiers is bizzare, why should they get legal protection that gives them weekends off but Cops, Firemen, Doctors, Cashiers who work at tourist joints, Deutsche Bahn employees, bartenders, hookers, gas station cashiers, pilots, airport employees, etc. etc. etc.

Outdated church law is outdated.
 
2013-05-24 02:53:45 PM

silvervial: Onkel Buck: Spent most of my 20's stationed in Germany. I approve of the ranking.

It's interesting that anyone who ever spent any time in Germany, and actually experienced Germany and not just the base they were stationed at, love the fark out of the place. You can't even say that about France or Italy, but Germany, Ja!


yep...it's a fascinating phenomenon
 
2013-05-24 03:01:41 PM

bungle_jr: silvervial: Onkel Buck: Spent most of my 20's stationed in Germany. I approve of the ranking.

It's interesting that anyone who ever spent any time in Germany, and actually experienced Germany and not just the base they were stationed at, love the fark out of the place. You can't even say that about France or Italy, but Germany, Ja!

yep...it's a fascinating phenomenon


You know some older folks in the military if you know anyone who was stationed in France, I think they closed down all foreign military bases in 1967.
 
2013-05-24 03:07:33 PM

silvervial: Onkel Buck: Spent most of my 20's stationed in Germany. I approve of the ranking.

It's interesting that anyone who ever spent any time in Germany, and actually experienced Germany and not just the base they were stationed at, love the fark out of the place. You can't even say that about France or Italy, but Germany, Ja!


I re-enlisted just so I could go back for another tour. I was in Kitizigen and Schweinfurt the first time and Hanau the second time, all the bases I was at have since been closed or are closing. I spent a lot of time with my German girlfriends family the second tour. I loved having Christmas at her house. Her opa was a baker and her onkel was a butcher, (not single candlestick maker in the whole family though) and the things they would make for the holidays were absolutley delicious! Then there is Silvester and Fasching! There was always a party going on! As a 20 something year old kid how could you not enjoy yourself! Did a lot weekend road trips to go see stuff too. Stopped at gasthaus someplace on the way back from a trip one night to get something to eat. The housefrau told us we were the first Americans that had been there since the war. We found it hard to believe but we went a long with it. Well she ended up getting us hammered on some homemade brandy and we wouldnt ya know we had to stay the night. so she waived the bill for the meal and the drinks and just charged us for a room which was her plan all along I assume. Yah I had a pretty good time. I'm glad I spent my 20s there rather than at a college campus. I thought Paris was pretty cool, but Berlin and Amsterdam are probably my two favorite European cities.
 
2013-05-24 03:20:41 PM

Onkel Buck: silvervial: Onkel Buck: Spent most of my 20's stationed in Germany. I approve of the ranking.

It's interesting that anyone who ever spent any time in Germany, and actually experienced Germany and not just the base they were stationed at, love the fark out of the place. You can't even say that about France or Italy, but Germany, Ja!

I re-enlisted just so I could go back for another tour. I was in Kitizigen and Schweinfurt the first time and Hanau the second time, all the bases I was at have since been closed or are closing. I spent a lot of time with my German girlfriends family the second tour. I loved having Christmas at her house. Her opa was a baker and her onkel was a butcher, (not single candlestick maker in the whole family though) and the things they would make for the holidays were absolutley delicious! Then there is Silvester and Fasching! There was always a party going on! As a 20 something year old kid how could you not enjoy yourself! Did a lot weekend road trips to go see stuff too. Stopped at gasthaus someplace on the way back from a trip one night to get something to eat. The housefrau told us we were the first Americans that had been there since the war. We found it hard to believe but we went a long with it. Well she ended up getting us hammered on some homemade brandy and we wouldnt ya know we had to stay the night. so she waived the bill for the meal and the drinks and just charged us for a room which was her plan all along I assume. Yah I had a pretty good time. I'm glad I spent my 20s there rather than at a college campus. I thought Paris was pretty cool, but Berlin and Amsterdam are probably my two favorite European cities.


every year around late-november and into december i get seriously "home"sick for germany. i mean, they basically invented christmas, or at least many of the traditions we know and love. they really get into the spirit of that holiday, and the christkindl markts are amazing!
 
2013-05-24 03:23:06 PM
Nothing like the hangover you get from drinking too much cheap red wine and rum for the fourth year in the row after promising "no more gluehwein ever again" yet another time..
 
2013-05-24 03:32:58 PM

Lyonid: Suede head: I admire Germany and wish I were German.

Don't give up hope.  Third time's a charm.


But 4th time is the reich one.
 
2013-05-24 03:35:18 PM
Ah, yes, Christmastime in Germany! What a spectacular time it was, the best time of the whole year. The entire country is dressed up like Christmas Wonderland, at least it seemed that way to me as a kid. I really, really missed that when we came back to America. Christmas was never the same after having experienced it in Germany. Sigh.
 
2013-05-24 03:40:50 PM

silvervial: Ah, yes, Christmastime in Germany! What a spectacular time it was, the best time of the whole year. The entire country is dressed up like Christmas Wonderland, at least it seemed that way to me as a kid. I really, really missed that when we came back to America. Christmas was never the same after having experienced it in Germany. Sigh.


You can blame it on the socialist war on Christmas here.
 
2013-05-24 03:48:24 PM
 vygramul

Congrats on graduating!  I wish it weren't such a rainy day for you and yours, but, hey, it's the event that matters, not the weather.  I've heard Colbert was great.

You've been favorited.  However, as a graduate of The University of Virginia (JMU...we pre-game like you party), I've been forced to change your text highlight to "Blue-3," the closest I could get to Duke purple.  I'm sure you understand.

Also, if you dig groceries/cooking, you probably already know about The Market (downtown, near the ABC store).  The butcher there is insane.  I challenge you to ask for a cut of meat he doesn't carry.
 
2013-05-24 04:06:01 PM
I moved from Austin to Germany 5 years ago. I was only supposed to here for two if that tells you anything. I actually have no urge to go back to the States. Sure I miss it sometimes but I love living here. I enjoy the lifestyle and love the culture. I also love that you can get to most countries in Europe in just about no time. Amsterdam and Prague are my favorite cities. Paris is overrated but the south of France is great. Budapest is a nice city....nicer than Paris in my opinion. Berlin is cool and London is fun as all get out.  Taking off to Barcelona for my first trip to Spain in a few weeks. Can't farking wait.
 
2013-05-24 04:11:14 PM

m053486: vygramul

Congrats on graduating!  I wish it weren't such a rainy day for you and yours, but, hey, it's the event that matters, not the weather.  I've heard Colbert was great.

You've been favorited.  However, as a graduate of The University of Virginia (JMU...we pre-game like you party), I've been forced to change your text highlight to "Blue-3," the closest I could get to Duke purple.  I'm sure you understand.

Also, if you dig groceries/cooking, you probably already know about The Market (downtown, near the ABC store).  The butcher there is insane.  I challenge you to ask for a cut of meat he doesn't carry.


Lol - Duke Purple. I'm actually thinking of applying to Duke to get my history Ph.D. I live behind Barracks Shopping Center, so Downtown is really on the other side of the 'ville from me. I'll have to check it out next time I make a Spudnuts run.
 
2013-05-24 04:13:02 PM

vygramul: brantgoose: vygramul: Suede head: I admire Germany and wish I were German.

I can actually claim German citizenship. (And Lithuanian. And possibly Polish.)

The French used to have "blood" or patrimony citizenship, which meant that those with French ancestors could claim it. I believe there was a cut-off, so that us French Canadians could not claim citizenship unless the connection with the old country was recent.They have switched to a less racial and more abstract basis of citizenship, like the American model.

Germany's used to be any ancestry, but now they added a language and culture requirement. I'd have to brush up to claim it.

Lithuania additionally requires you worked towards their independence, which I did in a documentable manner.

I don't know Poland's requirement. I may or may not qualify. I don't speak Polish at all.


I believe Germany has compulsory military service...May want to think that one through.

I'm actually dual US/UK citizen.  Just got UK recently.

Born and raised in US, to a British Mother.  Used to be only Fathers could pass on citizenship, but a few years back, they changed it cause sexism and all.

Probably one of the best things I could do, considering it's all benefit for me.
 
2013-05-24 04:15:24 PM

tripleseven: I believe Germany has compulsory military service...May want to think that one through.


Not since July 2011.. Even then, there were ways to weasel out of it if you were a dual citizenship holder and you could take non military alternatives.

http://www.faz.net/aktuell/politik/inland/bundeswehr-wehrpflicht-sol l- zum-1-juli-ausgesetzt-werden-1577622.html
 
2013-05-24 04:18:55 PM

lilplatinum: tripleseven: I believe Germany has compulsory military service...May want to think that one through.

Not since July 2011.. Even then, there were ways to weasel out of it if you were a dual citizenship holder and you could take non military alternatives.

http://www.faz.net/aktuell/politik/inland/bundeswehr-wehrpflicht-sol l- zum-1-juli-ausgesetzt-werden-1577622.html


Hmmm, wonder if my fiancée could get German citizenship.  Her dad was German.  I could of course just apply for her UK when we get married.
 
2013-05-24 04:24:37 PM

tripleseven: Hmmm, wonder if my fiancée could get German citizenship.  Her dad was German.  I could of course just apply for her UK when we get married.


Well it never would have effected her anyway since it wasn't for men.  I'm not sure, I think you have to apply for citizenship if your parent is German before 23 but I could be wrong.   Probably worth looking into, can never hurt for her having a Schengen passport..  Although you won't be able to parlay that into one of your own without giving up your others.
 
2013-05-24 04:31:32 PM

lmxloco: I will now tell you a German joke. "A sausage maker buys a box of cereal."

[southparkstudios.mtvnimages.com image 480x360]



Some German Comic I saw years ago:

First, I want you to know that not all Germans are methodical and precise.

Joke number one!

My father is from Hamburg and my mother is from Frankfurt, so I am the cross between a Hamburger and a Frankfurter.

:: a smattering polite but nervous laughter ::

That joke sucks in German,


/ the rest of his act was hilarious, but I only remember his painfully lame opener
 
2013-05-24 04:34:53 PM

lilplatinum: tripleseven: Hmmm, wonder if my fiancée could get German citizenship.  Her dad was German.  I could of course just apply for her UK when we get married.

Well it never would have effected her anyway since it wasn't for men.  I'm not sure, I think you have to apply for citizenship if your parent is German before 23 but I could be wrong.   Probably worth looking into, can never hurt for her having a Schengen passport..  Although you won't be able to parlay that into one of your own without giving up your others.


I already have a US and a UK, no need for more.
 
2013-05-24 04:39:33 PM

tripleseven: I believe Germany has compulsory military service...May want to think that one through.

I'm actually dual US/UK citizen.  Just got UK recently.

Born and raised in US, to a British Mother.  Used to be only Fathers could pass on citizenship, but a few years back, they changed it cause sexism and all.

Probably one of the best things I could do, considering it's all benefit for me.


I'm too old for military service.

I considered getting a passport, especially during the brief time EU passports had the pass-through line at airport security over there. But I worked for an agency where they might well have asked me to surrender dual citizenships, and so long as I hadn't claimed them, they would likely not bother me about it.
 
2013-05-24 05:12:57 PM

Rapmaster2000: They say that the Germans always make good stuff, but that's because they have never seen German pornography.


We have some German equipment where I work according to our maintenance guys the stuff is over engineered junk. Availability is very poor.
 
2013-05-24 05:39:35 PM

bungle_jr: lilplatinum: bungle_jr: funny thing is, aside from having to learn some of the language to really enjoy the experience, i did NOT have culture shock going over there...but going back home to hope, arkansas, on leave, i had MAJOR culture shock and could not wait to get back "home" to germany!

Try living up north far away from the Americans - It'll come.

/also had reverse culture shock
//had i moved somewhere other than Brooklyn where I actually had to drive, it probably would have been worse.

the worst part of living around kaiserslautern was all the americans

but, because of the huge k-town american population, i didn't have to learn the whole language to get by...however, because of the huge k-town american population, i was not motivated enough to learn the whole language.

good and bad on that part. it was easy to communicate most places. but i really should have learned the language anyway. i did try...i can read certain fairly simple things (menu/food labels, simple instructions, etc) in german. and the news that would come on the top of every hour on the radio stations, i could pick up on key points since they spoke clearly and simply, and newsreaders reading headlines often do in any language.

i was always really pissed off at the americans who EXPECTED the locals to speak english, and they had not interest in picking up on any german words/phrases...even had a dumbarse friend who got mad at the lack of english speaking in certain places.

one time i was ordering at mcdonalds (yes, i know...but since i lived there, eating some american fast food wasn't a big deal...and it tasted a little different than stateside mcd) in german...the guy spoke back to me in english. i said "i'm trying to practice my german"...he said "i'm trying to practice my english". touche!


Was stationed in Bamberg (US Army) in the '70s (yes, I'm old); came back in the big-hair '80s, did Ramstein, Spangdahlem (DoD), and for some reason ended up in Bavaria.  I didn't really learn any German until I really had to.  The funniest thing: I catch the kids at work "mocking" my accent, but they still want me to translate modern slang.  I advise them to read the "Urban Dictionary", and to get off my lawn.
 
2013-05-24 05:49:54 PM
I still haven't forgiven them for this.

i4.ytimg.com
 
2013-05-24 06:39:30 PM
Germany was top?  Really?

Deutchland über alles?
 
2013-05-24 11:31:43 PM
arbeit macht frei?
 
2013-05-25 03:53:23 AM

AverageAmericanGuy: Popular != good.

You know who else was popular?


That's right: Obama.
 
2013-05-25 04:06:16 AM

Lollipop165: vygramul: It's always funny when you see American tourists eating at a KFC or McDonald's. It's like, really? You're not going to try a Pizza Margherita while you're in Naples? Not going to go to the cafe for pastries and gelato? You're going to eat THERE?

I always try to do a quick stop at a Mickey D's when I'm abroad. McDonalds is so ubiquitous but each country serves very different things - I find it a fun and cute way to spot cultural differences on the cheap. In Italy, burgers are served on ciabatta rolls. In Canada, they serve poutine. In Japan, they serve cheese katsu sandwiches and fries you can season yourself. And of course beer is served in England and Germany. Also, England has an awesome curry dipping sauce. Hell, I went to a McDonalds down south and there were some notable menu differences.

Maybe I'm weird but I just find it intriguing.


I do think it's funny when I go to a McDonald's in the center of Moscow how packed full of tourists it is. Try  some local food,dammit!

/i've lived here long enough that I'm allowed to go to McDonald's
 
2013-05-25 06:17:52 AM
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