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(The Inquirer)   Let's all wish a happy 40th birthday to everybody's favorite twisted pair   (theinquirer.net) divider line 17
    More: Cool, Ethernet, Institute of Electrical, optical fiber cable, LAN, Electrical and Electronics, mother boards, pairs, coaxes  
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13734 clicks; posted to Main » on 24 May 2013 at 10:08 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Funniest)
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Archived thread
2013-05-24 10:35:04 AM
4 votes:
i.imgur.com
2013-05-24 09:49:29 AM
4 votes:

show me: Yeah, uh, ethernet is a protocol, it's not wires.


It's a series of tubes.
2013-05-24 11:33:42 AM
2 votes:
I remember when we finally replaced IPoAC (IP over Avian Carriers) for our WAN back in the '90s. Saved lots of time and money.
2013-05-24 09:31:19 AM
2 votes:
I perceive some lawns being walked on and clouds sorely in need of a good yelling at.
2013-05-24 08:22:03 AM
2 votes:
0.tqn.com
2013-05-24 03:39:01 PM
1 votes:
Twisted pair? Testicular torsion is no laughing matter, folks!
2013-05-24 11:40:12 AM
1 votes:
NewWorldDan:

nekom: It wasn't always twisted pairs. I remember working with ethernet using BNC connectors and coax wire.

Yeah, twisted pair didn't come in until what? 1990?

Back in the 80's it was all coax cable and $1500 adapters. And you'd have to provide your own TCP/IP stack.

And we LIKED it.

Early 90s, bought some co-ax gear for a small office. Installed it. Discovered we didn't have any terminators for the end of the run. Spent the whole day driving around trying to find a place that had some. I learned a lot in those days. Usually after I screwed something up.


Somewhere in my junk drawer I have a bunch of 10B2 terminators I made by making short pigtails of coax with a BNC on one end, stripping the other end and soldering two 20 ohm resistors in parallel across them. (This was for my home network, and I'm cheap.)

So in the oh-so-likely event that you have to find 10B2 terminators... Radio Shack has them, some assembly required.

CS,B:

In the late 80's I ran the computer labs at a small college that was just starting to offer Novell courses. The part-time instructor was a pompus ass who evidently was network admin for some government agency and he would be the first to tell you how smart he was.

He called me at home one saturday morning in a rage to tell me how one of the machines must have failed because no matter what he did he couldn't get it on the class network. So I drive in, take one look at the cabling, and notice that the cable on that machine was coming out of one side of the T connector... looping around and... plugging into the other side of the same T connector.

I made a crack about loopback interfaces and left.
2013-05-24 11:31:27 AM
1 votes:

show me: I used to work for IBM Global Services in the late '90s and our company issued laptops were still using token ring exclusively until about 1998 or so. And yeah, I've heard every joke about the token getting lost and having to buy another one.


Did you also hear a lot about mouse balls?
2013-05-24 11:17:48 AM
1 votes:

SMB2811: show me: Yeah, uh, ethernet is a protocol, it's not wires.

The Ethernet standards are a Physical and Link-Layer protocol specification. It does indeed specify what is going on at the physical layer.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEEE_802.3

If you want to complain about the headline, you would have to point out that UTP/STP was nowhere to be found in the original Ethernet specifications.


OK, I'm not really a network guy, just trying to be snarky without having all the information. Thanks for the info.

I used to work for IBM Global Services in the late '90s and our company issued laptops were still using token ring exclusively until about 1998 or so. And yeah, I've heard every joke about the token getting lost and having to buy another one.
2013-05-24 10:54:38 AM
1 votes:

mark--fark: jehovahs witness protection: nekom: It wasn't always twisted pairs.  I remember working with ethernet using BNC connectors and coax wire.

Don't forget the good ole IBM type 1.

Those connectors were for Token Ring.......


My first network was token ring.  Worked great until one day the token fell out and got lost.  Only one local store had tokens and they wanted 5 grand for them!  That's the day I started switching over to ThinLAN.
2013-05-24 10:46:22 AM
1 votes:
Twisted pair

external.ak.fbcdn.net

Ow! My NO-NOs!
2013-05-24 10:37:37 AM
1 votes:
Really Twisted Pair

static.tvguide.com yuq.me
2013-05-24 10:35:33 AM
1 votes:
I still have all the BNC T connectors and 50 Ohm terminators from the upgrade to 10 meg 10BASET cat 5 in the mid to late 90's. I used some of the bridge connectors to tie them all together and make a monster out of them. Still have it at my desk.
2013-05-24 10:30:21 AM
1 votes:
deathandtaxesmag.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com


...a pint of raw ethernet and two dozen amyls....
2013-05-24 10:15:49 AM
1 votes:

Marcus Aurelius: show me: Yeah, uh, ethernet is a protocol, it's not wires.

It's a series of tubes.


A Co-worker sent me an ethernet on Wednesday, and I didn't get it until this morning.
2013-05-24 10:15:11 AM
1 votes:
My first network used barbed wire. I tell ya, it was pretty wild back in Wyoming in the 1890s.
2013-05-24 09:48:53 AM
1 votes:

nekom: It wasn't always twisted pairs.  I remember working with ethernet using BNC connectors and coax wire.


Yeah, twisted pair didn't come in until what?  1990?

Back in the 80's it was all coax cable and $1500 adapters.  And you'd have to provide your own TCP/IP stack.

And we LIKED it.
 
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