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(The Register)   Byzantine empire helped build the babel tower that is Bitcoins   (theregister.co.uk) divider line 22
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2007 clicks; posted to Geek » on 24 May 2013 at 7:41 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-24 08:08:10 AM
Referencing a 19th century historian on his opinions on the Byzantine Empire is just foolish, as foolish as referencing Gibbons and his research on the Fall of the Roman Empire, which has been soundly dismissed by scholars.  Unfortunately scholarship on the Byzantine empire has lagged behind other civilizations for several reasons.  One of the reasons is that early 20th century Russian Scholars were beginning to translate sources and advance scholarship in the area but the whole communism thing happened, which resulted in many Russian Scholars abandoning their research and many western scholars not participating in anything those pinko commies did.  It wasn't until the mid 20th century that Byzantine Scholarship really took hold in the western world, Dumbarton Oaks had something to do with that, a Harvard research facility based in Washington DC which has a very extensive library of Byzantine Sources and artifacts.  They also have courses on Byzantine Greek which is a farking pain in the ass because they didn't have any any any sense of grammatical structure and its mostly hagiographical which can get boring.

In a sense, Byzantine Scholarship has really progressed since this guy wrote these things in the 19th century.  For the serious student, read Ostrogorsky but he only talks of the political history of the Empire and doesnt talk much of the church which is a shame because many of the middle eastern Christianity sects came during the rule of the Empire.  I always enjoyed the books by Steve Runciman, a very good scholar and would also recommend anything by Cyril Mango or Ihor Shevshenko or Alice Mary Talbot or the like.

Byzantine Scholarship is advancing in the academic world but it still lags behind the history of other civilizations.  With the further translations of sources and epistilography I hope that this civilization will find its right place in history, good or bad it doesn't really matter.
 
2013-05-24 09:11:25 AM
Sounds excessive complicated.
 
2013-05-24 09:15:30 AM
The Bitcoin ecosystem today is not very sophisticated: there is no borrowing or lending, no ability to short, and not that much spending (most people are hoarding bitcoins).

So the value is due, in part, to scarcity caused by hoarding?
 
2013-05-24 11:13:21 AM
So having Bitcoins is like over-extending yourself on pointless wars with Persians which leave you unable to defend Egypt from Islamic invaders causing a gradual downward spiral that comes to a head when a bunch of Venetians on their way to the Crusades stop by and say "hey, let's just raid this place and call it a day" leaving you a wrecked shell of your former self to be cleaned up by a Turk who was known for making ugly drawings and bad poetry when he wasn't killing the hell out of a lot people?
 
2013-05-24 11:16:31 AM

Target Builder: The Bitcoin ecosystem today is not very sophisticated: there is no borrowing or lending, no ability to short, and not that much spending (most people are hoarding bitcoins).

So the value is due, in part, to scarcity caused by hoarding?


People most certainly short bitcoins.
 
2013-05-24 11:25:14 AM
All I know is that their Cataphract units kick ass.
 
2013-05-24 12:02:20 PM

Target Builder: The Bitcoin ecosystem today is not very sophisticated: there is no borrowing or lending, no ability to short, and not that much spending (most people are hoarding bitcoins).

So the value is due, in part, to scarcity caused by hoarding?


Yes, the value of bitcoin primarily comes from speculators hoarding them.  In other words, it's a price bubble.
 
2013-05-24 12:43:09 PM

burning_bridge: So having Bitcoins is like over-extending yourself on pointless wars with Persians which leave you unable to defend Egypt from Islamic invaders causing a gradual downward spiral that comes to a head when a bunch of Venetians on their way to the Crusades stop by and say "hey, let's just raid this place and call it a day" leaving you a wrecked shell of your former self to be cleaned up by a Turk who was known for making ugly drawings and bad poetry when he wasn't killing the hell out of a lot people?


To be fair, the Persians totally started that last war.
 
2013-05-24 01:23:32 PM
A link to listentobuttcoin.com is required every time bitcoin comes up.
 
2013-05-24 02:02:45 PM

Target Builder: So the value is due, in part, to scarcity caused by hoarding?


In part. BitCoin is engineered to create scarcity- there's a maximum rate at which they can be made, and eventually (hundreds of years from now), there will be no more BitCoins to be made. That sort of thing encourages hoarding, which drives the price up, which encourages hoarding, which...

BitCoin involves some cool mathematics, but its economic philosophy is strictly pre-industrial. It's funny, actually, how the most technologically advanced currency is so economically backwards.
 
2013-05-24 04:03:38 PM
Dammit. Beat to the Civ5 comment.

/leaves sulking.
 
2013-05-24 04:08:50 PM
Pretty decent article, if a bit negative toward Bitcoin.

I'm not really buying the "volatility" thing - for the most part, the value has remained fairly stable.
 
2013-05-24 05:10:25 PM

soia: Referencing a 19th century historian on his opinions on the Byzantine Empire is just foolish, as foolish as referencing Gibbons and his research on the Fall of the Roman Empire, which has been soundly dismissed by scholars.  Unfortunately scholarship on the Byzantine empire has lagged behind other civilizations for several reasons.  One of the reasons is that early 20th century Russian Scholars were beginning to translate sources and advance scholarship in the area but the whole communism thing happened, which resulted in many Russian Scholars abandoning their research and many western scholars not participating in anything those pinko commies did.  It wasn't until the mid 20th century that Byzantine Scholarship really took hold in the western world, Dumbarton Oaks had something to do with that, a Harvard research facility based in Washington DC which has a very extensive library of Byzantine Sources and artifacts.  They also have courses on Byzantine Greek which is a farking pain in the ass because they didn't have any any any sense of grammatical structure and its mostly hagiographical which can get boring.

In a sense, Byzantine Scholarship has really progressed since this guy wrote these things in the 19th century.  For the serious student, read Ostrogorsky but he only talks of the political history of the Empire and doesnt talk much of the church which is a shame because many of the middle eastern Christianity sects came during the rule of the Empire.  I always enjoyed the books by Steve Runciman, a very good scholar and would also recommend anything by Cyril Mango or Ihor Shevshenko or Alice Mary Talbot or the like.

Byzantine Scholarship is advancing in the academic world but it still lags behind the history of other civilizations.  With the further translations of sources and epistilography I hope that this civilization will find its right place in history, good or bad it doesn't really matter.


aand?

how would you better summarize them into a couple of sentences loosely tied to this bitcoin concept better than that 19th scholar?
 
2013-05-24 05:34:06 PM

burning_bridge: So having Bitcoins is like over-extending yourself on pointless wars with Persians which leave you unable to defend Egypt from Islamic invaders causing a gradual downward spiral that comes to a head when a bunch of Venetians on their way to the Crusades stop by and say "hey, let's just raid this place and call it a day" leaving you a wrecked shell of your former self to be cleaned up by a Turk who was known for making ugly drawings and bad poetry when he wasn't killing the hell out of a lot people?


That's certainly a byzantine way of putting it.

/article even got it wrong: It means overly complicated and labyrinthine, not treachery
 
2013-05-24 05:35:47 PM

t3knomanser: In part. BitCoin is engineered to create scarcity- there's a maximum rate at which they can be made, and eventually (hundreds of years from now), there will be no more BitCoins to be made. That sort of thing encourages hoarding, which drives the price up, which encourages hoarding, which...


Just like gold!

/suck it, Austrians
 
2013-05-24 07:28:06 PM

TaskForce26: All I know is that their Cataphract units kick ass.




At 2300 Mechwarrior Credits, they should.
www.blogcdn.com

/don't bother with flamers
//or machine guns
 
2013-05-24 07:43:47 PM

Ishkur: burning_bridge: So having Bitcoins is like over-extending yourself on pointless wars with Persians which leave you unable to defend Egypt from Islamic invaders causing a gradual downward spiral that comes to a head when a bunch of Venetians on their way to the Crusades stop by and say "hey, let's just raid this place and call it a day" leaving you a wrecked shell of your former self to be cleaned up by a Turk who was known for making ugly drawings and bad poetry when he wasn't killing the hell out of a lot people?

That's certainly a byzantine way of putting it.

/article even got it wrong: It means overly complicated and labyrinthine, not treachery


The reason that "unreliable networks" researchers refer to it as the Byzantine Generals Problem is that the generals of the time were notorious for switching sides on a regular basis.
 
2013-05-24 09:28:54 PM

over_and_done: The reason that "unreliable networks" researchers refer to it as the Byzantine Generals Problem is that the generals of the time were notorious for switching sides on a regular basis.


To be fair, it was difficult to figure out who should be fighting who in the wake of the Partitio Terrarum Imperii Romaniae.
 
2013-05-24 11:19:09 PM
Oh Bitcoins

You so crazy.

/and thats all I have to say on the subject
 
2013-05-25 12:01:30 AM

A Terrible Human: A link to listentobuttcoin.com is required every time bitcoin comes up.


The next day she pays the man who delivers the wine she'd ordered a few days before to drive her to her family BBQ, giving her brother-in-law the worst gift imaginable: 0.34 BTC. She spends the rest of the party evangelizing about bitcoins and people there allegedly want some of their own.

What the shiat.
 
2013-05-25 03:23:15 PM

Fuggin Bizzy: What the shiat.


I dunno,I just like hearing the cosby coin thing cause it's funny.
 
2013-05-25 03:28:07 PM

soia: Referencing a 19th century historian on his opinions on the Byzantine Empire is just foolish, as foolish as referencing Gibbons and his research on the Fall of the Roman Empire, which has been soundly dismissed by scholars.  Unfortunately scholarship on the Byzantine empire has lagged behind other civilizations for several reasons.  One of the reasons is that early 20th century Russian Scholars were beginning to translate sources and advance scholarship in the area but the whole communism thing happened, which resulted in many Russian Scholars abandoning their research and many western scholars not participating in anything those pinko commies did.  It wasn't until the mid 20th century that Byzantine Scholarship really took hold in the western world, Dumbarton Oaks had something to do with that, a Harvard research facility based in Washington DC which has a very extensive library of Byzantine Sources and artifacts.  They also have courses on Byzantine Greek which is a farking pain in the ass because they didn't have any any any sense of grammatical structure and its mostly hagiographical which can get boring.

In a sense, Byzantine Scholarship has really progressed since this guy wrote these things in the 19th century.  For the serious student, read Ostrogorsky but he only talks of the political history of the Empire and doesnt talk much of the church which is a shame because many of the middle eastern Christianity sects came during the rule of the Empire.  I always enjoyed the books by Steve Runciman, a very good scholar and would also recommend anything by Cyril Mango or Ihor Shevshenko or Alice Mary Talbot or the like.

Byzantine Scholarship is advancing in the academic world but it still lags behind the history of other civilizations.  With the further translations of sources and epistilography I hope that this civilization will find its right place in history, good or bad it doesn't really matter.


Every day for the past ten years this person has gotten up from bed, made some coffee, ate a bowl of cereal, gone to the bathroom, taken a shower, brushed his teeth, and as he gazed into the mirror he claimed to himself: Today is the day. Today is the day where if anyone on FARK mentions the Byzantines, I'll step up and wow them.

You were finally right, soia. You did it. So now the question is, what's next?
 
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